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Full text of "State record North Carolina"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

NCSU Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/staterecordnorth1988nort 



99th Annual 
Commencement 

North Carolina State University 



CORRECTED COPY 




Saturday, May 7 

Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Eight 

Degrees Awarded 1987-88 



DEGREES CONFERRED 




Saturday, May 7 

Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Eight 

Degrees Awarded 1987-88 



This program is prepared for informational purposes only. The appearance of an 
individual's name does not constitute the University's acknowledgement, certifica- 
tion, or representation that the individual has fulfilled the requirements for a degree. 

Honors listed for May 1988 candidates for degree are tentative in that they are 
calculated without the final semester grades. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Musical Program iii 

Mr. Edwin Newman iv 

Exercises of Graduation v 

Commencement Ushers vi 

Commencement Marshals vi 

Faculty Retirements 1987-88 vi 

Time and Location of Distribution of Diplomas vii 

ROTC Commissioning Ceremony ix 

Academic Costume x 

Academic Honors x 

Undergraduate Degrees 1 

Professional Degrees 74 

Graduate Degrees 75 

Master's Degrees 75 

Master of Arts Degrees 85 

Master of Science Degrees 86 

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine 98 

Doctor of Education Degrees 100 

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 104 

Alumni Distinguished Professors 127 

Outstanding Teacher Awards for 1987-88 127 

Awards for Achievement— 1987-88 128 

Army ROTC Commissionees— 1987-88 136 

Navy ROTC Commissionees— 1987-88 136 

Air Force ROTC Commissionees— 1987-88 137 



Musical Program 

EXERCISES OF GRADUATION 

May 7, 1988 



Commencement Band Concert: 8:30 a.m. 
Carter-Finley Stadium 

Die Wachparade Blankenburg 

(arr.) J. R. Watson 



March Juno Stuart 

"Seventeen Come Sunday" Vaughan Williams 

"Folk Songs from Somerset" Vaughan Williams 

America the Beautiful Ward-Dragon 

PROCESSIONAL: 9:00 A.M. 

March Processional Grundman 

RECESSIONAL: (Platform Party Only) 

University Grand March Goldman 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY COMMENCEMENT BAND 
Dr. Frank M. Hammond. Conductor 



EDWIN NEWMAN 




Edwin Newman has been described as the only 
host of "Saturday Night Live" ever to moderate a 
presidential debate. He has also been described as 
the only moderator of a presidential debate ever to 
be host of "Saturday Night Live." In fact, he has 
made three appearances on "Saturday Night Live" 
and has moderated two presidential debates, the 
first Ford-Carter in 1976 and the second Reagan- 
Mondale in 1984. 

Newman retired from NBC News early in 1984, 
after having been associated with the network for 
almost 35 years. During that time, he headed the 
NBC bureaus in London, Rome, and Paris, reported 
from three dozen countries, and anchored every 
kind of news program the network produced. It is 
said that he has taken part in more documentaries 
than anyone else in television history. He has also 
worked with the NBC Religious Programs Unit and for NBC Sports, and was the 
host of broadcasts from Tanglewood by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He has 
taken part in the Metropolitan Opera Quiz, both as questioner and as panel member. 
Newman has received awards for reporting from abroad, commentary, documen- 
tary reporting, interviewing, and drama criticism, and is a Chevalier of the French 
Legion of Honor. 

Newman's journalistic career began in Washington in 1941, after his graduation 
from the University of Wisconsin and a semester of graduate work at Louisiana State 
University. He worked first for International News Service and then for the United 
Press. He spent three and a half years in the Navy during World War II, and then 
returned to wire service and newspaper reporting until 1947, when he began two 
years as a news writer at CBS in Washington. He began working for NBC in London 
in 1949. 

Newman is well-known for his views on the state of the English language. His 
books on the subject, Strictly Speaking, and A Civil Tongue, were best sellers. He has 
served as Chairman of the Usage Panel of the American Heritage Dictionary and as 
a consultant on a series of textbooks on grammar and composition published by 
Houghton Mifflin. In addition, he has written on a variety of subjects for many 
American, British, and Canadian publications, among them Reader's Digest, TV 
Guide, Harpers, Esquire, The Atlantic, the New York Times Magazine, Geo, News- 
week, Saturday Review, Psychology Today, and Punch. His comic novel, Sunday 
Punch, was published in 1979. 

After his retirement from NBC, Newman became a twice-weekly columnist for 
King Features Syndicate. He is active on the lecture circuit, and has continued to 
work in television, anchoring numerous programs on PBS, including the series 
"Congress: We the People," and the annual conferences of former Secretaries of 
State. He has appeared frequently on cable television, including acting as host of two 
dramatic series, "Freud" and "The Borgias." 

Newman and his wife, Rigel, live in New York City. Their daughter Nancy, and 
her husband, Henry Drucker, are members of the faculty of Edinburgh University 
in Scotland. 



Exercises of Graduation 

Carter-Finley Stadium 

Chancellor Bruce R. Poulton 
Presiding 

May 7, 1988 

PROCESSIONAL, 9:00 a.m Dr. Frank M. Hammond 

Conductor, North Carolina State University Commencement Band 

The Audience is requested to remain seated during 
the Processional. 

WELCOME Chancellor Bruce R. Poulton 

INVOCATION The Reverend Starke S. Dillard, Jr. 

Assistant to the Rector 
Christ Episcopal Church 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

NATIONAL ANTHEM The Grains of Time 

INTRODUCTIONS Chancellor Poulton 

GREETINGS President C. D. Spangler, Jr. 

The University of North Carolina 

ADDRESS Mr. Edwin Newman 

Broadcast Journalist 

CONFERRING OF HONORARY DEGREE Chancellor Poulton 

CONFERRING OF DEGREES Chancellor Poulton 

Candidates for Doctor of Veterinary Medicine pre- 
sented by Dean of College of Veterinary Medicine, 
Candidates for other advanced degrees presented 
by Interim Dean of Graduate School, Candidates for 
baccalaureate degrees presented by Deans of Col- 
leges. 

ADDRESS TO FELLOW GRADUATES Ms. Laura G. Lunsford 

Class of 1988 

RECOGNITIONS Chancellor Poulton 

VALEDICTORIANS-CLASS OF 1988 

ALMA MATER The Grains of Time 

RECESSIONAL (Platform Party only) 



Commencement Ushers 



Army ROTC Ushers 

Bridges, James F. 
Emmett, David L. 
Evrenidis, Paul, Jr. 
Garcia, Eduardo L. 
Jones, Mark 
Raynor, David B. 
Robb, Elizabeth 
Sasser, Jeffrey L. 
Stokes, John R. 
Troutman, Timothy C. 
Wilson, Woodrow 0. Ill 
Young, James A. 



Navy ROTC Ushers Air Force ROTC Ushers 



Chrislip, Chris 
Kirchner, Jim 
Lesslie, Scott 
Schadt, Mark 
Syme, Scott 
Womble, Thomas 



Blair, Stephen M. 
Chase, Ian V. 
Deal, Michael V. 
Edwards, Linda R. 
Farrior, Stanley M. 
Haley, Jodi D. 
Huber, Robert P. 
Jenkins, Jeffrey J. 
Kaleel, Melinda G. 
Kowalske, Bryan J. 
Mauro, Caroline P. 
Moreno, Anthony S. 
Sands, Tim 
Smith, Robert G. 
Thomas, James C. 
Tyynismaa, Michael D. 
Whitley. Charles R. 
Williams, James B. 
Yang, Helen 



Commencement Marshals 



Sheila Maureen Bennett 
Paul Crenshaw Briggs 
Jeffrey Franklin Cherry 
Kerr Collins 
Stephen Price Cook 
Margaret Evelyn Cunning 
David Lewis Fu 
Trevor Gadson 
Karen Michelle Grady 
Thomas Mark Hadley, Jr. 
Scott Hunter 



Christopher W. Johnson 
Laura Anne Lehman 
Lora Ann Long 
Paige Martz 
Tori Marie Morhard 
Brian L. Nixon 
Stephanie Darrice Porter 
Miriam Graham Preston 
Blair Vernon Robinson 
Kimberly Lynn Rowell 



Cristie Anne Sealey 
Victor Blaine Sitton 
Steven Glen Skaggs 
Anne Elizabeth Stubbins 
David Keith Ward 
David Lee Whiteman, Jr. 
Kimberley G. Whittington 
Michael Gregory Willits 
John Richard Witcher, III 
Leigh Ann Young 



Faculty Retirements 1987-88 

Alvarez, Raul Eduardo, College of Engineering, retired December 31, 1987 

Amein, Michael, College of Engineering, retired December 31, 1987 

Aurand, Leonard William, College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, retired December 31, 

1987 
Kohl, Jerome, College of Engineering, will retire June 30, 1988 

Guthrie, Frank Edwin, College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, retired January 31. 1988 
Konsler, Thomas Rhinehart, College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, retired December 31, 

1987. 
Marsland, David Boyd, College of Engineering, will retire May 15, 1988 
Metzger, Robert Stephen, College of Humanities & Social Sciences, will retire May 15, 

1988 
Perry, Thomas Oliver, College of Forest Resources, retired December 31, 1987 
Petersen, Keith Stuart, College of Humanities & Social Sciences, will retire May 15, 1988 
Powell, Nathaniel Thomas, College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, will retire July 15, 

1988 
Register, Carolyn Crouse, College of Education and Psychology, will retire May 31, 1988 
Saxe, Raymond Frederick, College of Engineering, retired December 31, 1987 
Stack, Edward MacGregor, College of Humanities & Social Sciences, will retire May 15, 

1988 
Stannett, Vivian Thomas, College of Engineering, will retire May 15, 1988 
Struble Raimond Aldrich, College of Physical & Mathematical Sciences, retired 

December 31, 1987 



Time and Location of Distribution 
of Diplomas 



College and Department Locations 



College of Agriculture and Life Sciences — 1:30 p.m. 

Adult and Community College Education . . . Room 1C-D, McKimmon Center, 

Western Boulevard 
Agricultural Business Management and Agricultural 

Economics Main Floor, Reynolds Coliseum 

Agronomy, Crop Science, Soil Science 

and Conservation 2215 and 2223 Williams Hall 

Animal Science Room 2, McKimmon Center 

Biochemistry Room 7, McKimmon Center 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering Weaver Laboratories Pavilion 

Biological Sciences 3712 Bostian Hall 

Biological Sciences Major 

Botany 

Ecology 

Entomology 

Genetics 

Microbiology 

Nutrition 

Pest Management 

Plant Pathology 

Toxicology 

Food Science 105 Schaub, Food Science Building 

Horticultural Science NCSU Arboretum, Beryl Road 

Individualized Study Program Location of Major Faculty Adviser 

Poultry Science Baptist Student Center, 2702 Hillsborough Street 

Applied Sociology 218 Withers Hall 

Zoology 222 Dabney and upper level breezeway 

Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences 

Medical Technology 

Zoology Majors 

School of Design— 1:30 p.m Stewart Theatre 

Reception— 2:30 p.m Brooks Hall Courtyard 

College of Education and Psychology— 1:30 p.m. except for those marked with an 
asterisk 

Administration and Supervision 220 Poe Hall 

Adult and Community College 

Education Room 1C-D McKimmon Center, Western Boulevard 

Counselor Education 532 Poe Hall 

Curriculum and Instruction, Special Education, 

and Middle Grades Education 412 Poe Hall 

Education General Studies 220 Poe Hall 

*Mathematics and Science Education— 2:00 p.m 216 Poe Hall 

*Occupational Education: Agricultural Education, Health 
Occupations Education, Industrial and Technical 

Education, and Occupational Education —1:00 p.m 216 Poe Hall 

Psychology Dining Hall 



College of Engineering— 1:30 p.m. 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering Weaver Laboratories Pavilion 

Chemical Engineering Thompson Theater 

Civil Engineering Lobby of Mann Hall 

Electrical and Computer 

Engineering Governor Holshouser Building 

N.C. State Fairgrounds 

Engineering Operations 109 Riddick 

Furniture Manufacturing and Management 242 Riddick 

Industrial Engineering 242 Riddick 

Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering University Student Center Ballroom 

Materials Science and Engineering McKimmon Center 

Nuclear Engineering North Portico, Burlington 

Engineering Laboratories 

College of Forest Resources— 1:30 p.m Area 1A and B, 

McKimmon Center, Western Boulevard 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences— 1:30 p.m. 
Accounting, Business Management, 

and Economics Main Floor, Reynolds Coliseum 

History 100 Harrelson Hall 

Multi-Disciplinary Studies Program 

English, Foreign Languages and Literatures, 

Philosophy and Religion West Raleigh Presbyterian Church, 

27 Home Street 

Political Science Caldwell Hall Patio 

(Rain: Caldwell Hall Lobby) 

Sociology 218 Withers Hall 

Speech-Communication Gymnastic Area, 

Carmichael Gym (Rock Wall) 

College of Physical and Mathematical 

Sciences— 1:30 p.m Pullen Memorial Baptist Church 

Hillsborough St. at Cox Ave. 

College of Textiles— 1:30 p.m Sandy Campbell Auditorium 

240 Nelson Hall 



ROTC COMMISSIONING 
CEREMONY 



Lieutenant Colonel Howard K. Fisher, Jr., USA 
Presiding 

Stewart Theatre 
May 7, 1988 

PROCESSIONAL MARCH, 4:00 p.m Dr. Frank M. Hammond 

Conductor, North Carolina State University Commencement Band 

The audience is requested to remain seated until Processional music is completed 

NATIONAL ANTHEM 

INVOCATION Major Van M. Jones 

Chaplain, NC Army National Guard, 
Raleigh, NC 

INTRODUCTIONS Dr. Bruce R. Poulton 

Chancellor, North Carolina State University 

ADDRESS General Maxwell R. Thurman 

Commander, United States Army Training and Doctrine Command 

ADMINISTRATION OF OATH 
OF OFFICE Lieutenant Colonel Howard K. Fisher, Jr. 

Professor of Military Science 

Captain Harold A. Bunch 

Professor of Naval Science 

Colonel Cleveland Simpson 

Professor of Aerospace Studies 

PRESENTATION OF CERTIFICATES Dr. Bruce R. Poulton 

BENEDICTION Major Van M. Jones 

RECESSIONAL 

The audience is requested to remain seated until the Recessional music is completed. 



Academic Costume 

Academic gowns represent a tradition handed down from the universities of the 
Middle Ages. These institutions were founded by the Church; the students, being 
clerics, were obliged to wear the prescribed gowns at all times. Round caps later 
became square mortarboards; the hoods, originally cowls attached to the gowns, 
could be slipped over the head for warmth. 

Many European universities have distinctive caps and gowns which are different 
from those commonly used in this country. Some of the gowns are of bright colors and 
some are embellished with fur. A number of these may be noted in the procession. 

The usual color for academic gowns in the United States is black. The bachelor's 
gown is worn closed, the master's and doctor's may be worn open or closed. The shape 
of the sleeve is the distinguishing mark of the gown: bachelor— long pointed sleeves; 
master— oblong, square cut in the back with an arc cut away in front; doctor — bell 
shaped. 

Caps are black. The tassels for the Ph.D. degree are gold and those for other 
graduate and professional degrees may be of the color corresponding to the trim- 
mings on the hoods. 

Of all the components of the academic costume, the hood bears the heaviest 
symbolic burden. The hood must make clear the level of the degree, the faculty in 
which it was given, and the institution which awarded it. The level of the degree is 
shown by the size of the hood, the width of the velvet trimming, and in the case of 
doctors, by the shape. The bachelor's, master's, and doctor's hoods are three feet, 
three and one-half feet, and four feet long, respectively. The velvet trimming in the 
same order is two, three, and five inches and extends all around the hood on the 
exposed edge. This same trimming identifies the faculty in which the degree was 
awarded. For each faculty there is a corresponding color; so a glance at the trimming 
is all that is needed to identify the faculty. A partial list of the colors follows: 
Agriculture, maize; Architecture and Art, brown: Science, golden yellow; Econom- 
ics, copper: Education, light blue; Engineering, orange; Forestry, russet: Physical 
Education, sage green; Religion, scarlet; Speech, silver gray; Veterinary Medicine, 
gray; Textiles, wine red. The following faculties have the same color — dark blue: 
Anthropology. History, Languages, Literature, Philosophy, Political science. So- 
ciology. 



Academic Honors 

Honors participants benefit from a more individualized and rigorous approach to 
their desired degree through special classes, seminars and individual research. 

Undergraduate degree honor designations are: 

Cum Laude— for GPA 3.250 through 3.499 
Magna Cum Laude— for GPA 3.500 through 3.749 
Summa Cum Laude— for GPA 3.750 and above. 



UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 



College of Agriculture and 
Life Sciences 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL AND 
GRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the 
College of Engineering. See page 19 under the College of Engineering for a listing of 
the graduate seniors in the jointly administered program. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CONSERVATION 

Jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the 
College of Forest Resources. 

Degree Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Mark Bruce Ethridge Swansboro 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Anne Elizabeth Cain Hamptonville 

Andrew John Johnstone Garner 

Stuart Scott Thompson Vienna, VA 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

*Karol Lynn Knapp Pleasant Valley, NY 

***Rebecca Kay Robertson Old Fort 

Robert Palmer Willcox, Jr Raeford 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS 
MANAGEMENT 

Degree Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Steve Howard Herrell Monroe 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Robin Elise Brantley Apex 

Robert Delos Peterson Charlotte 



t Co-major 



'Cum Laude 



! Magna Cum Laude 



'Summa Cum Laude H Honors Program 



Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Lisa Helen Davis Crouse 

Diana Lynne Lanier Clarkton 

Gail Varo Neels Hydes, MD 

fAndy Cade Norton Whiteville 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Ricardo Nedic Ashford Goldsboro 

Diane Mia Bateman Raleigh 

James Ralph Britt, Jr Mount Olive 

t**Vernon Neal Cox Tabor City 

Alfred Forrest Denise III Siler City 

David Lyell Evans Saint Pauls 

Dallas Preston Garner Newport 

Beverly Joy Green Gastonia 

tWesley Hiott Huffines Burlington 

{Margaret Mary Kozik Charlotte 

**Julie E. Marlatt Broadus, MT 

Ernest Gordon Marlette Graham 

Jeffrey Scott Overcash Mooresville 

Frederick Fleming Pollard Robersonville 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Johnny Carson Barnes Spring Hope 

John Douglas Bunting Pinetops 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Charlie Leslie Manning III Bethel 

John Horton Wright, Jr Jamestown 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRONOMY 
Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Kenneth Randall Ray Hillsborough 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Michael Robert Decker Lenoxdale, MA 

Kenneth David Fishback Lexington 

William Alfred Gardner Wilson 

Michael Don Harman Raleigh 

***James Latham Hodges, Jr Washington 

Robert Edward Hyman Oak City 

Michael Mewborn Smith Goldsboro 

William Alan Ward Ash 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Moseph Carroll Black Seaview, VA 

Darren Neal Cecil Thomasville 

Franklin Wyette Howey, Jr Monroe 

tDouglas Clyde Lowe High Point 

Thomas Glen Pegram Shelby 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



Jon Lee Stewart Buies Creek 

Grace Carol Summers Browns Summit 

*Ralph Lloyd Warren, Jr Mount Olive 

Phillip Doddridge Winslow Hertford 

Michael Wade Worthington Greenville 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Degrees Conferred June 2k, 1987 

H*Mark Wakefield Hamrick Mocksville 

fEvander Lee McGregor, Jr Raleigh 

H**Bentley Miles Stephenson Pinehurst 

***Wendy Jane Underwood Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Douglas Gray Best Dunn 

Christopher Gerard McGreevy Raleigh 

Mary Ann Schreiber Ridgefield, CT 

*Patrick Alan Sustar Charlotte 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Edward Javier Berkhoff Raleigh 

H***Yvonne Diane Carter Shelby 

Joanne Amelia Decker Durham 

Diane Elizabeth Essick Raleigh 

Jennifer Ann Hansen Charlotte 

Terese Novick Raleigh 

Dorothy Ellen Primrose Washington, DC 

Kelly Neal Reep Lincolnton 

Christopher Carl Reeves Sparta 

Sylvia Lane Sullivan Garner 

Mark Thomas Walton Mocksville 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Roy Lee Abernathy Morganton 

*David Edgar Anderson Oak Ridge 

Elizabeth Scott Atwell Raleigh 

Danny James Bledsoe Dobson 

H**Cynthia Denise Burnett Charlotte 

Michael Darien Cain Hamlet 

HtTina Marie Cecil High Point 

tStephen Lane Collier Zebulon 

H*Johnny Dale Dellinger Lincolnton 

tJohn Joseph Euchner, Jr Gastonia 

Brian Carr Griffin Windsor, VA 

**Robert Samuel Hanes, Jr Raleigh 

Martin Roy Ingram Raleigh 

DeLane Marie Isley Burlington 

fMargaret Mary Kozik Charlotte 

Craig Ross Lennon Bladenboro 

Margaret Keesler Marshall Raleigh 

***Kevin Neil McKisson Henderson 

**Tracy Anne Meadows Charlotte 

H Joan Leigh Metcalf Hendersonville 

Sharon Murphy Nelson Greensboro 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



Christopher Lamar Parrish Raleigh 

Alison Williams Peeler Durham 

April Elizabeth Peters Greensboro 

Cindy Lee Robinson Raleigh 

Jeffrey Dawson Shelley Laurel Hill 

H***Mary Rena Smith Rocky Mount 

Angela Kathleen Staley Rockingham 

H Susan Rose Tilley Oak Ridge 

H*James Edward Tuck, Jr Graham 

Brenda Ivy Watson-Czuwala Brooklyn, NY 

H Wendy Kay Welch Hope Mills 

Hf***Sherry Lynn Wilson Warrenton 

Teena Wooten Hookerton 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY 
Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Richard White Skinner Hertford 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

***Cynthia Bell Buzzard Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOCHEMISTRY 
Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Stewart Keyth Roten Durham 

Melissa Ann Skertich Fayetteville 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

H***Said AH Suleiman Al-yahyaee Bahla, Oman 

Hf*Annamarie Klas Anderson Raleigh 

**David Scott Donaldson Charlotte 

fLisa Elinor Eklund Raleigh 

tSarah Elisabeth Glover Asheboro 

H|**Lisa Lynne Haney Indialantic, FL 

William Fuller Hunt Durham 

Evelyn Santos Moreno Fayetteville 

*Stuart Wilson Pullen Raleigh 

fDavid Ward Rusnak Raleigh 

fKatherin Spotswood Teer Raleigh 

tNancy Graham Waff Statesville 

f*Lisa Eugenia Williams Wilmington 

Ht*Rhonda Michelle Winstead Nashville 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

H**Jill Christine Akkerman Raleigh 

Hf**Lorrie Valentina Apple Reidsville 

Marietta Austin Raleigh 

Lance Richard Brooks Fayetteville 

H***Sheryl Denise Brown Kinston 

H*Gordon Edward Cashin Richmond, VA 

**Diana Lynne Crawford Fayetteville 

tJohn Paul Dekker III Fayetteville 

t***Shelia Crocker Hopkins Selma 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



H*Leanne Kay Madre Poquoson, VA 

H*Erik Alexander Manring Reston, VA 

Michael Charles McFadden Raleigh 

Karen Annette Motsinger Lexington 

H***Donna Gail Patterson Elon College 

H***Lillian Hamilton Rinker Burlington 

Christine Lawrence Sumerel Hillsborough 

H***Shawn Michael Toffolo Horseheads, NY 

***Johnny Clayton Weeks III Burlington 

Nathan Dean Whitehurst Burlington 

Alisa Ann Windley Raleigh 

H|***Jennifer Rose Wood Raleigh 

H**Lynnette Michelle Wyatt Wilmington 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL AND 
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

Degree Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Elizabeth Umstead Studenberg Garner 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Gregory Lee Hodges Chocowinity 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

James Milton Bass II Fayetteville 

Joseph Phillip Garbo Hope Hills 

David Lawrence Godwin Benson 

Daniel Locke McKenzie Gastonia 

Randall Fred Pasley Grassy Creek 

**Lloyd Harrill Roberts High Point 

Gary Robert Scalf Bath 

Timothy Slade Seagroves Cary 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Brian Robert Bradshaw Newton 

t**Vernon Neal Cox Tabor City 

*John Martin Gann Asheboro 

Gregory Fielding Kirtley Wilmington, DE 

Eric Drew Menscer Fayetteville 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 
Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

H*Carla Armstrong Dennis Raleigh 

Rana Jawdat Mohammad Amman, Jordan 

Jeanne Marie Salisbury Saint Pauls 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Sandra Louise Barber Fayetteville 

**Margaret Treuting Edwards Clayton 

tLisa Elinor Eklund Raleigh 

H*Margaret Elizabeth Grau Raleigh 

Peter Jordan Harris Raleigh 

Dannie Corinne Harrison New Bern 

Erica Anne Headley Raleigh 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



Carolyn Margaret Holt Summit, NJ 

*Scott Allen Kirchner Shelby 

tMelinda Kay Lamb Thomasville 

William Nash McCachren, Jr Mount Airy 

Sharon Fry Newman Frankfort, KY 

H***John David Norris Havelock 

Keith Alfred Peoples Raleigh 

fDavid Ward Rusnak Raleigh 

tKatherin Spotswood Teer Raleigh 

t*Lisa Eugenia Williams Wilmington 

Pamela Lynn Woollard Gastonia 

Elizabeth Ellen Young Raleigh 

*Frank Sherrill Young Charlotte 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

H**Ahmed Khalfan Al-Mughtasi Izki, Sultanate of Oman 

Ht**Elizabeth Hill Austin Raleigh 

H Michele Elizabeth Becker Goldsboro 

H***Lisa Ann Brone Absecon, NJ 

H***David Allen Browder Weldon 

**Laura Nicole Callis Marshfield, MA 

H*Marlana Kathryn Chapin Potomac, MD 

tWilliam Lester Crowell, Jr Charlotte 

fJohn Paul Dekker III Fayetteville 

**Thomas Joseph Ellis Wilson 

H**Angela Louise Galey Fayetteville 

H***Daniel Henry Johnson Rocky Mount 

Lynetta Michelle Johnson Siler City 

Jonathan Eric Lamb Oak Ridge 

Peter Joseph Leget Vienna 

**Jeanne Elaine Miller Pineville 

Joanna Belle Miller Wilson 

Christina Ruth Murchison Goldston 

Beverly Jean Ramsey Watha 

Martha Allyn Richardson Greenville 

H Cynthia Gineane Seal Kill Devil Hills 

Karen Linda Sokolove Raleigh 

Victor Alfred Varela Winston-Salem 

Leslie Ann Walrath Corning, NY 

John Weaver Young Durham 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (Microbiology) 
Degree Conferred June 2U, 1987 

H**Julie Waters Lynch Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Dana Marie Agnell Raleigh 

Alan Clarke Buck Basking Ridge, NJ 

Sandra Fay McManus Hamlet 

Laura Anne Niver Raleigh 

Ht*Rhonda Michelle Winstead Nashville 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

H**Tammy Lynn Bannerman Statesville 

Roxanne Fletcher House Franklinton 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



Lourdes Maria Saap San Juan, Puerto Rico 

H***Laura Therese Whritenour Lumberton 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BOTANY 
Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Ronald Wayne Gagliardo Elizabeth, NJ 

t***Andrea Michelle Herr Lancaster, PA 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Michael Ashton Berdine Parkersburg, WV 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE SCIENCES 
Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Tony Van Brabble Plymouth 

Elizabeth Jane Waldrop Greensboro 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Sharon Lynn Briles Asheboro 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

LaVerna Beth Davis Randleman 

Walter Daniel Giese Jacksonville 

Christopher Michael Heath Commack, NY 

Bradley Dean Hoyle Cherryville 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

**Roger Darrel Bryan Hudson 

Kurtis Lowell Gregg Morehead City 

H Susan Kathleen Hansen Winston-Salem 

***Jennifer Ryder Howard Durham 

***Michael Ray Lusk Wilmington 

Wallace Lathan McAnulty Asheboro 

Medhat Mansour Hussein Mansour Mohamed Raleigh 

John Victor Stauber Memphis, TN 

***Jonathan Edward Thompson Winston-Salem 

Jack Lionel Todd Whiteville 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FOOD SCIENCE 
Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Laura Alison Anderson Hockessin, DE 

Sandra Kay Metko North Syracuse, NY 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Mary Margaret Brake Rocky Mount 

Diuana Genita Davis Trinity 

Jennifer Ann Faris Chapel Hill 

Margaret Byrd Knight High Point 

Elizabeth Anne Martin Cary 

Jennifer Lynn Maruri Laurel, MD 

Rana Jawdat Mohammad Amman, Jordan 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



Whitney Anne Obrig Delmar, NY 

♦Elizabeth Edgington Rushin Raleigh 

***Rabab Ahmad Saadi Amman, Jordan 

Joan Christine Redecker Sims Raleigh 

Sarah Jane Smith Charlotte 

Andrea Lynn Twiford Rocky Mount 

Francesca Vesce Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 
Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Mark St. John Clapp Fayetteville 

Tod Jerome Williams Whiteville 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Ronald Eugene Dean Raleigh 

Charles Samuel Echerd Raleigh 

Mark Edward Gantt Conover 

John Paul Guidon '. Powhatan, VA 

Jay Dean Lang Cary 

James Thornton Mitchell Raleigh 

Randolph Walter Morgan Buffalo, NY 

***Thomas Benton Moss II Enfield 

Jodi Maria Robinson Falls Church, VA 

Angela Leigh Soles Shallotte 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Kenneth Wayne Bailey Fayetteville 

Robert Eugene Boyd Hope Mills 

David Andrew Crow, Jr Huntsville, AL 

tWesley Hiott Huffines Burlington 

William Ransom Johnston Wilson 

H John David Leford Lincolnton 

fDouglas Clyde Lowe High Point 

Robert Willard Luther III Elizabeth City 

Kathryn McWhorter Morgan Fayetteville 

Carolyn Frances Powell Raleigh 

Winifred Wynn Strickland Charlotte 

Bruce Andrew Wagoner Gibsonville 

Micah Kevin Weston Richlands 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDIVIDUALIZED STUDY PROGRAM 
Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Susan McDermott Edmondson Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 
Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Nathan Devaughan Bell, Jr Clinton 

H*Elizabeth Anne Brown Norristown, PA 

Karen Renee Smith Fayetteville 

Ann Therese Winders Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

H**Penny Helane Wall Reidsville 

t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PEST MANAGEMENT FOR 
CROP PROTECTION 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Ellen Susan Blenk Goldsboro 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN POULTRY SCIENCE 
Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

*Steven Richard Clark Morganton 

fEvander Lee McGregor, Jr Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Donna Kaye Carver Roxboro 

tStephen Lane Collier Zebulon 

Wayland Thomas Davis, Jr Beulaville 

David Christie Duncan III Raleigh 

fJohn Joseph Euchner, Jr Gastonia 

Teddy Ray Godbey High Point 

William Andrew McRee Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN WILDLIFE BIOLOGY 
Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Russell Dwayne Branch Rowland 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ZOOLOGY 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Clarice Bratton Asheville 

**Susan Marie Dermer High Point 

Susan Gibson Johnson Greensboro 

H**Lemuel Broome Kirby Durham 

Brent Alan Solomon Raleigh 

Shonna Bartlett Tompkins Eureka 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Charles Kendrick Cheek Raleigh 

Donna Marie Lindeman Belair, MD 

Henry Stuart Marr Gastonia 

Margaret Anne Parker Raleigh 

Raymond Jacob Sabella Raleigh 

William Carl Stewart Pineola 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Hf*Annmarie Klas Anderson Raleigh 

Diane Elizabeth Ashby Goldsboro 

Cynthia Kay Baker Asheville 

*Patricia Diane Ballenger High Point 

Lesli Bernadette Barrett Richmond, VA 

Rosina Angela Collins Fayetteville 

Connie Lynn Davis Elizabethtown 

Robin Renee DuBois Goldsboro 

H*Karen Anne Grossmann Raleigh 

Judith Anne Heath Greenville 

Douglas Edward Hefner Hickory 

t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



Andrey Ann Mignacci Raleigh 

David Lewis Moncol Garner 

Tammy Lynn Moser Pittsburgh, PA 

Lisa Bernadine Palmer Fayetteville 

Steven Lee Pleasants Raleigh 

H**John Walton Sanders III Chattanooga, TN 

*Sarah Ruth Snyder Monroe 

William Daniel Stancil, Jr Raleigh 

Jill Ann Traywick Monroe 

Martha Ann Tucker Rockville, MD 

♦Kenneth McNeil Welborne Charlotte 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Mark Anthony Allen Lumberton 

Ht**Lorrie Valentina Apple Reidsville 

Carolyn Joan Ashfield Raleigh 

William Quentin Best Monroe 

John Emerson Bisi Selden, NY 

H***Pamela Kay Blackburn Lexington 

♦Brian Wayne Bozzo Centerville, OH 

Andrew Thomas Bruce Cullowhee 

Jennifer Anne Bruce Fair Haven, NJ 

tH Tina Marie Cecil High Point 

Susan Elizabeth Childers Havelock 

H**Kathleen Noel Christensen Fairfax, VA 

Susan Denise Combs Burlington 

fWilliam Lester Crowell, Jr Charlotte 

Catherine Michelle Daugherty Winston-Salem 

Kenneth Ronald Edgar Hudson 

Jerry Newcomb Ellington, Jr Henderson 

Elizabeth Ann Fenstermacher Collegeville, PA 

H*Marcy Lynne Fetter Raleigh 

Tonya Leigh Fitts Granite Falls 

James Randerson Downing Flowers Wilson 

Allyson Ford Foster Adelphi, MD 

Tamera Leigh Hamilton Raleigh 

Lisa Robin Harmon Charlotte 

***Brian Keith Harris Wilson 

H Mark William Harris Hillsborough 

***Halvor Warren Hem IV Raleigh 

♦Samuel Crawford Hill IV Fayetteville 

H^Mames Bennett Holleman, Jr Willow Springs 

Delores Clara Hovey New Bern 

H^George VanBuren Huffmon III Fayetteville 

Lori Kay Illing Raleigh 

H John Alan Kushner Fayetteville 

David Earl Lennard Plant City 

H^Bonnie Hough Lipke Charlotte 

Sharon Annette Lipper Raleigh 

Kelley Leigh Long Raleigh 

♦♦William Edward Mangano Raleigh 

Yvette Louise McAlister Fayetteville 

♦Kimberly Ann McDuffie Charlotte 

Leslie Marie Moran Raleigh 

H^Jerry William Mullis, Jr Mint Hill 

H^Christopher Joel Neville Memphis, TN 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude "'SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

10 



***l 



^Robert Jay Nix Vidalia, GA 

**Kathryn Love Ormsby Rockingham 

fDerek James Parks Goldsboro 

***Armando Pizzoni-Ardemani Padova, Italy 

Holli Vann Poe Laurinburg 

John Anderson Powell, Jr Baltimore, MD 

H John Flint Rhodes, Jr Raleigh 

Steven Thomas Riesenberg Monmouth Junction, NJ 

**Bryan Eric Rodgers Fayetteville 

Craig Thomas Rumple Statesville 

Frank Lee Shealy South Boston, VA 

Ronald Wilson Shearon, Jr Rolesville 

Denise Heather Smith Raleigh 

Harold Brian Stegall Warrenton 

Clarence Milton Stewart Colerain 

Vonda Lakecia Stewart Colerain 

Evelyn Sue Stutts Charlotte 

**Douglas Vance Sumerford Aberdeen 

Kara Michelle Utter Raleigh 

H**Diann Lynn Weddle Eden 

Rodney Preston Willis Raleigh 

Ht***Sherry Lynn Wilson Warrenton 

Deborah Alise Woltersdorf Birmingham, AL 

Ht***Jennifer Rose Wood Raleigh 

H Stacey Barbara Young Fort Washington, MD 



School of Design 






BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Cynthia Louise Bandy Matthews 

Christopher Pemberton Bell Goldsboro 

*Benjamin Barry Cahoon Engelhard 

*Douglas Lee Hall, Jr Sanford 

*Edwin Weaver Hargrave Raleigh 

♦Nathan Charles Isley Durham 

Carolyn Louise Jones Miami, FL 

Kenneth Charles Newell Lake Wylie, SC 

***Katherine Ann Nielsen Sanford 

Danny Kerron Wayne Owens Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands 

*Quinn Noel Pillsworth Winston-Salem 

Dallas Ray Proctor Rocky Mount 

Donald James Rethman Fort Loramie, OH 

Mark Lloyd Ruetschle Kettering, OH 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



11 



Leigh-Ann Freeman Stewart Durham 

Jeffrey Brent Yelton Charlotte 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 
Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Jorge Enrique Barragan Mexico City, Mexico 

**Natalie Suszanne Chanin Florence, AL 

Robin Lynn Pelt Griffin, GA 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Timothy Wendell Buie Welcome 

Robin Cordell Mangum Sparta 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN ARCHITECTURE 
Degree Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Katherine Belle Ponder Cullowhee 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

William David Hardister Asheville 

*Rana Abdulrahim Irshaid Kuwait, Kuwait 

***Katherine Ann Nielsen Sanford 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Darryl Eugene Belton Winston-Salem 

John Kendall Farnum Columbia, SC 

Bruce Eugene Fisher Goldsboro 

Eugene Henry Hester Liberty 

Richard Covington Lambeth II Thomasville 

Mark Peter Melaragno Charlotte 

Gregory Jerome Mondin Rockville, MD 

Jon David Peeples Lincolnton 

Joseph Anthony Schneider Wilton, CT 

Craig Andrew Spiegel Sayville, NY 

**Paul Brian Tennyson Greensboro 

Anne Elizabeth Williams Smithfield 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Peter John Almasy Raleigh 

Brian Whitley Baker Goldsboro 

Quan Tinh Banh Chapel Hill 

Jason Edward Bell Reidsville 

Karl Frederick Burkheimer Bahama 

Kimberly Elaine Clements Leesburg, FL 

James Archie Courter II Raleigh 

Jennifer Gay DeMent Richmond, VA 

George Donald Dudley, Jr Greensboro 

Rebecca Jo Duser Largo, FL 

Robert David Foster, Jr Raleigh 

William Thomas Goodwin, Jr Elizabeth City 

Michael Verner Greene Winston-Salem 

George Capers Hemingway III Tarboro 

*Robert Andrew Hoffman Lumberton 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

12 



Michael William Huntanar Fayetteville 

Bessie Angelo Kortesis Winston-Salem 

Linda Margery Malone Alexandria, VA 

Nathan Glen Maune Little Rock, AR 

Donna Ruth Beaty McPherson Raleigh 

***Brian Scott O'Kelley Greensboro 

Nicole Anne Pillorge Baltimore, MD 

**Sally Dabney Staub Charlotte 

***Daniel James St. Clair Winston-Salem 

James Boiling Sullivan IY Beaufort 

Krista Joan Williams Sparta, NJ 

David Scott Wilson Fayetteville 

Vernette Artherine Wattington McLeansville 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN 
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

*Joel Haden Evans Charlottesville, VA 

Matthew John Ingalls Fayetteville 

Kimberly Lynn May McLeansville 

**William Lee Wilson Statesville 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN PRODUCT DESIGN 
Degree Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Emma Eastman Godfrey Pound Ridge, NY 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Paul Marcus Flanagan Raleigh 

Vincent Edward Gardner Ayden 

Kathryn Marie King Lebannon, OH 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

*Jane Maria Burchard Svendborg, Denmark 

John Phillip Goodson Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Jon Eric Anderson Raleigh 

Melissa Carolyn Blackmon Hope Mills 

*Jamie Nell Cavin Landis 

Amber Jo Clemons Cary 

Margaret Brooks Greene Boone 

*Amy Louise Krapp Charlotte 

Michael John Muscarella Westhampton, NY 

Scott Thomas Shankle Raleigh 

Vernon Frank Tolliver Sanford 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN VISUAL DESIGN 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

*Allyson Beth Abbott New Bern 

"Mane O'Neal Fisher Raleigh 

*Vera Inez Gregory Angier 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

13 



Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

**Linda McGrath Fordham Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Julie Anne Harris Goldsboro 

Lois Ann Jensen Raleigh 

Nancy Crockett Miller Raleigh 

*Julie Lynn Purdum Mobile, AL 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Amy Johannah Bullard Durham 

Robert Adam Burns Raleigh 

**Douglas John Clouse Pittsboro 

**Tracy Lynn Dunfee Raleigh 

Jan Elizabeth Goodwin Louisburg 

Rebecca Marie Hansen Charlotte 

Denise Hazel Hatcher Raleigh 

**Beverly Robinson Murray Raleigh 

Sheila Lynn Nichols Jamestown 

**Elaine Guberman Selden Raleigh 

John Michael Teska Raleigh 

Gregory Earl West Fayetteville 

Janet Ross Willis Durham 



College of Education 




BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Martin Eric Lance Devon, PA 

William Kent Spears Conover 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Pauline Loring Dwight Lincolnton 

Alexander Otis Matthews Washington, DC 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Tammy Lorene Barrow Summerfield 

Dayna Lynn Bayles Erwin 

*John Lamar Edwards Ayden 

***Sheila Renee Greene Lenoir 

Kara Suzanne Harkins Cary 

Lori Jean Ketring Cary 

Anne Hughes Mauney Gastonia 

Carla June Myers Raeford 

t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



14 



Susan Rooney Myers Louisburg 

***Karen Paquette Parkes Greensboro 

Timothy Garner Stewart Lexington 

Eugenia Marie Tucker Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

***Stella Eileen Anderson New Bern 

Maria Andracchio Rocky Mount 

Angela Woolard Benson Willow Springs 

Kimberly Bistis Millington, NJ 

Belinda Faye Blackwood Elon College 

***Felicia Maria Bowen Cary 

Peggie E'Lisa Brafford Raleigh 

**Roger Alan Davenport Raleigh 

Charles Derek Dickens Greenville 

Dawn Marie Dillon Southern Pines 

Margaret Elizabeth Dixon Binghamton, NY 

***Mary Froese Enns Raleigh 

**Paula Diane Foley Raleigh 

Cindy Kay Fread Kearney, NE 

Sallie Michelle Gardner Belmont 

Dawn Alicia Grainger Shalimar, FL 

***Sharon Wolfe Hepp Charlotte 

Al Brenner Herr, Jr Cary 

Anthony Hubert Raleigh 

Lillian Jeanne Jacumin Shelby 

*Lisa Jill Johnson Knoxville, TN 

**Linda Darlene Jones Winston-Salem 

Nancy Jean Joyner Zebulon 

*Charles Edward Knott, Jr Durham 

*Laura Gail Lunsford Durham 

Ivanna Kay Mann Columbus, OH 

Laura Lynn Murdock Columbus, OH 

Bruce Duane Radcliffe Cary 

Lisa Ann Spruill Virginia Beach, VA 

Donnell Winders Taylor Faison 

Terri Leslie Vess Old Fort 

*Mary Melinda Wagoner Gibsonville 

Elizabeth Ann Wahl Raleigh 

**Gay Haley Walker Cary 

♦Jennifer Fleming Wells Greensboro 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
Agricultural Education 
Degree Conferred June 2U, 1987 

*Mark Thomas Dalton Hendersonville 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Michael Wayne Bennett Oak City 

Herman Edward Croom Pikeville 

John Ray Davis, Jr Louisburg 

H***Charlie Michael Wilder Bunn 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude '"SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

15 



Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

*John Burke Carpenter, Jr Bessemer City 

Wayne Phillip Farrar Lillington 

Gregory Howard Grayson Shelby 

Arlen Franklin Johnson Asheboro 

John Patrick Jones Faison 

Susan Barrier McKee Concord 

Richard Dewitt Peed, Jr Chocowinity 

Eric Thomas Powers Sanford 

General Studies 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

James Douglas Howard Wayne, PA 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

William Cardinal Cowen Raleigh 

George Henry Koop Raleigh 

David John Meyers Zebulon 

Ricky Rashae Morris Charleston 

Wilfred Lee Robbins Willard 

Roxanna Haunani Staton Fayetteville 

Health Occupations Teacher Education 
Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

***Debby Roscoe Nettles Hamlet 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

*Helen Nordan Campbell Cary 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

*Wendy Lou Aiken Benson 

**Vera Faulconer Barnes Smithfield 

***Roselyn Kouhi Egan Raleigh 

**Elizabeth Parrish Seitz Garner 

Industrial Arts Education 
Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Doyle Felton Blalock Colfax 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Randy Norman Lowder Hamptonville 

James Clarence Morgan III Bath 

William Hoke Page, Jr Raleigh 

Kathy Sue Ussery Star 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Joey Silas Clemmons Wilmington 

Rodney Leon Whaley Garner 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

16 



Marketing Education for Teachers 
Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

***Christie Leigh Bradsher Rolesville 

Mathematics Education 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Tammy Renee Atkinson Raleigh 

Robert Kenneth Delmar Boone Emporia, VA 

Gregory Eugene Chamblee Selma 

Ann Marie Chapoton Morehead City 

Jennifer Elaine Ellington Chester, VA 

Valerie Ann Gade Fort Pierce, FL 

Donna Lynn Goodfred Jacksonville 

***Andrew Ralph Herr Berea, OH 

Julie Crafton McAlister Reids'ville 

*Kathleen Meghan Murray Raleigh 

John Edward Pritchett Wilmington 

*Traci Lynn Roberson Robersonville 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Kristine Ann Balbo Rutherfordton 

Macqueline June Barnwell Hendersonville 

John Randall Bridges Franklinton 

**Billy Ray Brown, Jr Thurmond 

*Rebecca Ann Brown Hays 

Michael Warren Byrd Greensboro 

tPamela Dawn Edmondson Tarboro 

John Randall Goodfred Jacksonville 

*Tamara Rae Hatcher Raleigh 

Lindley Baxter Hayworth High Point 

Brian Stewart Hemric Ronda 

Lydia True Le Goldsboro 

Michael John Legeros Morehead City 

Julia Rebecca McGee China Grove 

***Ninette Yvonne Ribet Rutherford College 

Kimberly Paige Rogers Thomasville 

tTeresa Faye Rogers Mebane 

Christi Lynn Stikeleather Waxhaw 

Mathematics Education, Middle Grades Concentration 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Mary Allison Bradley Greensboro 

Marcelle Josephine Daughtry Clinton 

Sidney Linn Heilig Greensboro 

**Brenda Gay Lee Dunn 

*Donna Mclver Ratliff Wilmington 

**Jane Elizabeth Wiggs Cary 

Mary Alice Williams Cary 

Middle Grades, Language Arts and Social Studies Concentration 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Samuel Todd Bailey Raleigh 

Kelli Amanda Bradshaw Charlotte 

t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude "'SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



17 



*Mary Lou Critz Martinsville, VA 

Sharon Dawn Short Oxford 

***Catherine Marie Wood Saratoga, CA 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Faith Mary Bourbeau Glastonbury, CT 

Donna Louise Breniman Milwaukee, WI 

***Candace Hanes Knowles Huntersville 

Middle Grades, Mathematics and Science Concentration 
Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Desiree Padgett Blakley Raleigh 

Marian Margaret Lepper Fayetteville 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Cosette Thompson Grant Raleigh 

Deborah Ann Wilusz Charlotte 

Science Education 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Robert Eugene Hester Rocky Mount 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

William Joseph Fussell Tampa, FL 

LeAnder Dwaine Gray Ramseur 

fMelinda Kay Lamb Thomasville 

***Connie Jo Robinson Cincinnati, OH 

Jeffrey Trent Skinner Wilson 

Timothy Robert Skinner Wilson 

Jeanne Marie Salisbury Williams Saint Pauls 

*Melody Caroline Williams Williamston 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

t**Elizabeth Hill Austin Raleigh 

Phillip Howard Cox Lexington 

Kimberly Diane Frazier Asheboro 

Deborah Lynn Hodgin Graham 

Rice Gwynn Strange, Jr Pelham 

Matthew James Thomson Cary 

Richard Cromwell Walton Wilmington 

Science Education, Middle Grades Concentration 
Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

*Cheryl Eagle Irwin Burlington 

Theresa Louise Lamaze Gaithersburg, MD 

Brian Richard Piatt \ Kernersville 

* Ashley Goodman Whittington Erwin 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Sue Ann Colvin Miami, FL 

Amy Lynn Maynard Raleigh 

Donna Shuping McCallum Cary 

*Kathleen Margaret Murphy Albany, GA 

t Co-major "CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

18 



Technical Education 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

*Kenneth Eugene Mullis Concord 

Vocational Industrial Education 
Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Tammy Renee Garner Asheboro 

Kenneth Joseph Hill Glendale, NY 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

*Stephanie Elaine Truesdale New Bern 



College of Engineering 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL AND 
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the 
College of Engineering. 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Kim Howard Colson Chapel Hill 

William John Lelekacs Raleigh 

Linda Jones Rainey Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Todd Stephen Anderson Raleigh 

**Edward MacDonald Barnes Pisgah Forest 

Dana Jeffery Bolden Clyde 

Michael Wade Corbett Fountain 

Peter Edward Davis Raleigh 

Sidney Hunter Deck Greensboro 

Mark Edwin Haire Creswell 

Kent Pendleton Harrell Plymouth 

Mark Ep Hawes Morganton 

Brian Douglas Hinkle Asheboro 

John Mark Rice Cary 

Christopher Lee Suggs La Grange 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILE ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Textiles and the College of Engineering. 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

***Larry Charles Dickinson Hickory 

Elizabeth Ann Elam Charlotte 

Matthew Myers Thomas Swannanoa 

t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

19 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

Degree Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Naomi Frances Glasscock Skipwith, VA 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Elizabeth Ann Saunders Archdale 

John David Wilson Columbia, SC 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Shaun Michael DeAngelis Durham 

Timothy John Fennell Havelock 

Elizabeth Hiatt Jackson Jefferson 

**Vicki Lynn Owen Smithfield 

Christopher Brewer Sanders Raleigh 

Michael Scott Tippett Newport News, VA 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Teresa Sue Bass Lucama 

William Schoen Brinley Columbia, MD 

David William Cason Fort White, FL 

Aaron Bunnard Cozart Prospect Hill 

**William Bruce Davis Marietta, GA 

Darrell Scott Dearman Kernersville 

**Genevieve Anne Dellinger Crouse 

John Edwards Eans Monrovia, MD 

***Jack Ray Edwards, Jr Eden 

Jonathan Casey Frye Winston-Salem 

***Basil Hassan Raleigh 

Gregory Wyman Hill Indian Trail 

***Douglas James Hudson Raleigh 

Robert Bruce Irvine Delmar, NY 

William Thomas Jones Burlington 

***Marc William Kniskern Upper Marlboro, MD 

Charles Louis Lehning IV Jacksonville, FL 

Sabrina Kim Maclntyre Burlington 

**Alvin Archer Mason III Winston-Salem 

Michael Dean McDonald Clarkton 

***Michael Dean Neaves Lansing 

James Marinus Phillips Chapel Hill 

Gregory Dean Pryor Winston-Salem 

**Graham Scott Rhodes Smithfield 

Herbert Paul Sakas Wilson 

Phillip Lee Shaw Concord 

tDenette Lee Sleeth Novelty, OH 

George Taylor Story Durham 

Nidak Albert Sumrean Ramallah, Israel 

Lora Ann Taylor Abingdon, VA 

Benjamin Edward Withers Lillington 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 
Degree Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Jack Arnold Hammond II Covington, VA 



t Co-major "CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

20 



Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

**Kellie Marie Ticehurst Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

fJanet Ann Black Atlanta, GA 

**Sheila Ann Clark Lansing 

tSusan Lee Davis Palatka, FL 

Victoria Lynn Fox Akron, OH 

Brian Charles Francois Hickory 

Steven Paul Geil Raleigh 

t*Jasdev Singh Gill Augusta, GA 

William Andrew Hospodar Wilmington 

**Patrick Allen Jones Fayetteville 

Jeffrey Jason Jayner Farmville 

*Christine Rose LaMarre Monroe 

Vicky Milner Landrum Royal Oak, MI 

Thad Parrott Leister Winston-Salem 

Clyde Wilburn Lollis, Jr West Point, VA 

fStephanie Riddick Miller Hobbsville 

James Edwin Moore, Jr Greensboro 

*John Paul Morabito Rockville, MD 

Kim David Murphy Raleigh 

***Anne Naismith Nyack, NY 

Douglas George Parkes, Jr Greensboro 

Laurie Lynn Schilling Panama City, FL 

George Alan Sumrell Grifton 

David John Svendsgaard, Jr Chapel Hill 

Jerri Bea Thigpen Beulaville 

Richard Scott Warlick Shelby 

**Alan James Watters Chesterfield, VA 

***Robert James Weikel Greensboro 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Forest Wayne Adkins III Raleigh 

**Marty Allen Baker Charlotte 

*Philip Alan Block Greensboro 

t*Deborah Jean Bracht Wilmington 

Stephen Duncan Bradley III Davidson 

Michael David Brown Wilmington 

Susan Carol Byrd Durham 

**Philip Robert Caffrey Albuquerque, NM 

*Walter Stephen Cavin Stanley 

Donna Michelle Dannegger Raleigh 

Jeffrey Mark David Raleigh 

Elizabeth Claire Dillman Clemson, SC 

Laura Michelle Dwyer Raleigh 

Nilay Dhirajlal Garni Baroda, India 

***Gavin Lee Gaynor Hawesville, KY 

*Lisa Ann Gorsuch Fayetteville 

Shawn Christopher Graham Knightdale 

**William Andrew Gramley Winston-Salem 

Amy Stewart Gray Raleigh 

Michael Kevin Harvey Pembroke 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

21 



Cynthia Michelle Helms Monroe 

fAlex Ray Kirby Durham 

♦Bradford Alexander Lee Raleigh 

***Ernest John Lefevre, Jr Winston-Salem 

***Wilford Allen Leonard Greensboro 

Allan Ford Lowe Rockville, MD 

Krista Colette Marshall Winston-Salem 

Wayman Bernard McLaughlin, Jr Winston-Salem 

*Vincent Stephen Misiti Beckley, WV 

*Sandra Deanne Morgan Winston-Salem 

♦Barbara Ann Nath Raleigh 

t*Paige Meredith Newland Wilmington 

tRobert Brian Raybon Wendell 

*Matthew Thomas Reboli Goldsboro 

t***Philip Dean Rucker Lincolnton 

*Elinor Susan Sartwell Albion, NY 

Mukul Sharma Raleigh 

tJohn Lawrence Sorrels Raleigh 

***Hygie Irene Starr Greensboro 

James Edward Swinson Pink Hill 

Karl Evan Taylor Canandaigua, NY 

***Pearl Jennifer Tejano Kinston 

**Vernard Ray Thomas, Jr Greensboro 

Alan Brooks Urwick Charlotte 

Thomas Gerard von Lehmden Cincinnati, OH 

tJill Carroll Watson Raleigh 

Lisa Suzann Whitlow Greenville 

Phillip Edwin Wilson Asheville 

*Henry Michael Woerner Mount Pleasant 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

John Thomas Diffee III Winston-Salem 

Joseph Michael Schiavone, Jr Oakhurst, NJ 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

*Thomas Malvia Harris Raleigh 

**Taha Khedro Aleppo, Syria 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Louis Timothy Bailey Raleigh 

Mark Marion Behe College Park, MD 

John David Bishop Interlachen, FL 

Walter Scott Blauch Raleigh 

Wayne Andrew Brunnick Shelby 

Joel Anders Bulluck Rocky Mount 

Jeffrey Charles Cole Wrightsville Beach 

Paul Desmond Cray Cherry Hill, NJ 

Paul Howard Danforth Gloucester, VA 

Sharon Lee Dawson Tarboro 

Mary Frederick-Freeman Denman Fayetteville 

Douglas Michael Dieter Chapel Hill 

James Laurence Eason Raleigh 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude "'SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

22 



Edwin Scott Edwards Goldsboro 

Lynn Watson Evans Greenville 

Philip Bryan Faucette Mebane 

George Christian Guvernator IV Richmond, VA 

Angela Ruth Haigh Charlotte 

Richard William Hancock Robbins 

Steven Glenn Haynie Cary 

Kenneth Louis Jesneck Ayden 

Robert Allen Jones Raleigh 

Ted Ashley Kallam Mayodan 

Jeffrey Koury Mack Mooresville 

Kenneth Larry Marlow, Jr Greensboro 

Theodore Malcolm McDuffie, Jr West End 

Doris Caroline Meyer Beaufort 

Sharon Annette Milstead Charlotte 

***Randall Bryan Moore Durham 

Glenda Rose Mooring Snow Hill 

Leon Herbert Morris III Hickory 

Jeffrey Scott Mosley Rocky Mount 

Mark Alan Mulder Russellville, AR 

Brian Christopher Mulholland Hayesville 

Erik Scott Musselman Mocksville 

Randy Wayne Nance Salisbury 

Joseph Henry Newberry III Goldsboro 

John Joseph Olson Linwood, NJ 

*Achilleas Nicolaos Parathiras Ilioupolis, Greece 

Jess Taylor Patterson, Jr Burlington 

Brian Keith Pugh Thomasville 

Laura Elizabeth Rice High Point 

Mark Franklin Robbins Union Grove 

William John Shefcik Charlotte 

William Darwin Shehane II Charlotte 

Alan Louis Stone Bassett, VA 

Richard Thomas Thayer East Bend 

Robert Dale Thomas Wilmington 

*Phillip Gregory Tripp Ash 

Mark Alan Wilkes Clemmons 

Gregory Leigh Williams Granite Falls 

John Alvin Wolf, Jr Dunn 

*Alex Robert Wood Jacksonville 

*Robert George Woodruff Jensen Beach, FL 

Lisa Michelle Wooten Raleigh 

Scott Alan Yarley Durham 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Richard Childs Adams Columbia, SC 

*Terry Lee Albrecht Raleigh 

Brent David Barker Spencer 

Mark Douglas Bartlett High Point 

***Douglas O'Neal Bell Raleigh 

Richard Leon Bollinger, Jr Lumberton 

Andrew Peter Cadden Saint David's, PA 

Jeff Eugene Campion Clemmons 

Steve Derek Carpenter Arden 

Tracy Jeanine Clay Charlotte 

Christopher Todd Corriher China Grove 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

23 



**Donna Lee Costner Greenville 

Laura Ellen Dosser Wadesboro 

Edward Glenn Edens, Jr Gastonia 

*Charles Norfleet Edwards, Jr Durham 

***James William Edwards Rocky Mount 

Stuart Bevans Foard Phoenix, MD 

Stephen John Geiger Bel Air, MD 

Terry Robert Gibson Huntersville 

**Lisa Gonzalez Charlotte 

Bruce Faulkner Harrington Peachland 

Jane Marie Hayhoe Naples, FL 

Darren Zell Hennings East Bend 

***Stacey Lynn High Bailey 

Kevin Scott Holmes Aydlett 

James Darrin Holt Sanford 

Mark Joseph Hutnan Raleigh 

**Timothy Howard Keener Highlands 

William Bradley Kerr Fayetteville 

*Jeffrey Alan Koontz Saint Albans, WV 

**Michael Manuel Koutsourais Clearwater, FL 

Earl Randall Lewellyn Walnut Cove 

***Melanie Ann Mann Raleigh 

Yvette Michelle Massey Yadkinville 

Timothy Brian Matthews Wilson 

David Thomas McGee Fuquay-Varina 

John Bradley McLester Statesville 

Richard Dean McMillan Raleigh 

Stephen Eric Midkiff Pilot Mountain 

*Daniel DeLos Miles Wake Forest 

*Donald Lee Moss Pilot Mountain 

Richard Edwards Mullinax Goldsboro 

Danny Ray Mullis Monroe 

Glenn Wilson Mumford Pleasant Hill 

***Donald Thomas O'Toole Raleigh 

Gregory Shawn Peele Greensboro 

Karl Brian Peterson Charlotte 

Howard Justin Pickett Burlington 

Timothy John Plummer Coral Gables, FL 

Benjamin Franklin Pope III Fayetteville 

Carl Wilkins Ramsey Roxboro 

Michael Santowasso Flemington, NJ 

Adrian Dean Sarvis Kings Mountain 

Michael Warren Schrum Charlotte 

Thomas James Scott Bethesda, MD 

Anne Elizabeth Shanklin Charlotte 

Mark Ray Sizemore King 

Brian Vance Smith Greensboro 

*James Mark Smith Roanoke Rapids 

Karen Leigh Strock Raleigh 

Jeffrey Miles Tanner Greensboro 

Roger Darryl Thomas North Wilkesboro 

Paul Winebrener Utt Frederick, MD 

Flavio Vietti Vienna, VA 

Ellen Michelle Wagoner Greensboro 

Kirk David Wallace Wadesboro 

John Thomas Webert Brownville, NY 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

24 



**Steven Stuart Welton Chesapeake, VA 

Darin Noel Wilder Franklinton 

*Dianne Christine Wilson Scotia, NY 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING- 
CONSTRUCTION OPTION 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

David Gavin Moretz Hickory 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Kenneth Dale Angell, Jr Fayetteville 

Stephen Wayne Coleman Leasburg 

Christopher Reid Glover Dallas 

Michael Leonard Kiser Durham 

**Rondal Lee Leach Lake Toxaway 

Brenda Loraine Moore Burlington 

James Whitaker Nelms Newport News, VA 

Sean Clancey Robey Camden 

*Julian Curtis Yarborough, Jr Fayetteville 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Teddy Dale Baity Who 

Trudy Denise Brown Charlotte 

Donald Vance Chamblee, Jr Charlotte 

Chris Lyman Champion Kings Mountain 

James Harry Christman, Jr Fayetteville 

Javier Clawson Charlotte 

Mark Edward Collins Raleigh 

**Charles Randolph Cox Dunn 

Jennifer Brown Cross Raleigh 

*David Andrew Demick Maine, NY 

*Phillip Sherwood Dunston Louisburg 

George Franklin Ellis Shelby 

Richard William Ellis Franklin Lakes, NJ 

Roy Patrick Feser Jacksonville 

Paul Adam Freeman State College, PA 

Jeffrey Eric Getz Fayetteville 

***Curtis Jon Horvat Irwin, PA 

Allison Denise Kemp Creston 

Eric Simpson Lewis Shannon 

Ali Asghar Mahmoodi Ahwaz, Iran 

Scott Daniel Moore Wilmington 

Philip Thomas Moxley Boonville 

Joseph Bernard Obusek, Jr Marietta, GA 

Jerry Penlton Page Wilson 

Jacqueline Annette Roddy Wilson 

Lisa Michelle Routh Greensboro 

**Steven Andrew Swinehart North Canton, OH 

Marty Craig Tillman Siler City 

Jeryl Anderson Williams Kansas City, MO 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Sherwood Ray Belangia Summerfield 

Lars Peter Mage Chapel Hill 

t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



25 



Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Charles Laverne Copello II Raleigh 

Randall Wade Culler Mount Airy 

Adisorn Ermongkonchai Bangkok, Thailand 

Devin Lindsey Lushbaugh High Point 

Timothy Joseph Thomas Reno, NV 

***Charles Robert Yount Granite Falls 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

**Morris Howard Arthur Charlotte 

Donald Dean Brickerd, Jr Glenn Daje, MD 

Dennis Michael Briddell Charlotte 

Kevin Franklin Clayton Cary 

***Lori Lynn Coggins Appomattox, VA 

Floyd Scott Finley Winchester, VA 

Clinton Lane Gilbert Statesville 

Timothy Scott Gurganus Jacksonville 

Elian Hasrouni North Hollywood, CA 

William Edward Petty Jamestown 

***Tan Thanh Duy Phan Fayetteville 

Marwan Shaban Damascus, Syria 

♦David Keith Smith Raleigh 

***Mohammed Sriti Kenitra, Morocco 

Peter Thomas Tola, Jr Raleigh 

George Warren Wilder III Winston-Salem 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

John Frederick Schultze Charlotte 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Manal Elsayed Afify Raleigh 

Charlene Michelle Carter Greensboro 

Martin John Carter Winston-Salem 

**Gregory Paul Farmer Goldsboro 

Patrick Michael Farrell Raleigh 

Peter Feil Raleigh 

Joseph Scott Hunsucker Gibsonville 

***Jeffrey Hilburn Moreadith Reading, PA 

Keith Allen Reid Linden 

Daniel Henry Rouse Wilmington 

*Donald Bruce Spillane Havelock 

***Carol Louise Zanella Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Michael Johann Allion Charlotte 

Bruce William Bennett Ligonier, PA 

Robert Alan Goetz Middlesex, NJ 

*Lisa Marie Lange Raleigh 

James Alan Lewis Raleigh 

Lowry DuRant Lewis High Point 

Charles James Lord Asheville 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

26 



Darrell Lee Martin Raleigh 

**Ivan Francisco Matulic Sucre, Bolivia 

***Gerald James Trombley Mount Clemens, MI 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Robert Jeffrey Alexander Raleigh 

**Wael Ahmad Al-Qaq Jordan, Amman 

Camino Maria Andrade Raleigh 

Allan David Ashley Shelby 

t*Clinton Kesler Atkinson Siler City 

Robert Thomas Barfield Durham 

Stephen Gregory Barr Wake Forest 

Allen Scott Baxley Saint Albans, WV 

Joel Evan Benzing Raleigh 

*Jeffrey Odell Boger Mocksville 

*Daniel Sinclair Bunzey Davidson 

***Kara Leigh Caldwell Newton 

Dang Minh Cao Raleigh 

Michael Dean Carpenter Vale 

James Andrew Carros Winston-Salem 

Daniel Mark Carter Burlington 

Kendall Earl Cavender Raleigh 

Robert Michael Chittenden Charlotte 

*Joseph William Cowan Dunn 

Charles Mark Crampton Cary 

*Hien Thanh Dang Greensboro 

**Gregory Keith Daugherty Elon College 

Beverly Diane Deese Monroe 

Beverly Adams Dorland Norfolk, VA 

Pamela Kay Doughty Rockledge, FL 

*John Joseph Doyle Bayville, NY 

Taun Anh Doung Raleigh 

Ali Sammy Elaasar Winston-Salem 

Roy Thomas Ellis Fayetteville 

Glenn Richard Estes Franklin 

Matthew Lee Everett Robersonville 

Jesse Craig Frye Cliffside 

***Tracy Lawrence Fulghum Wilson 

**Alvin Dean Genzlinger Raleigh 

*Gregory Clayton Gilmore Greensboro 

Mark Albert Gordon Wilmington 

**Michael Steven Gudaitis Meridan, CT 

Thomas Joseph Gwynn Charlotte 

**Montague Ernest Hardy III La Grange 

Patrice Jones Hochstetler North Liberty, IN 

Mark Richard Hollifield Summerville, SC 

**John Boyce Honeycutt Charlotte 

Tri Huu Huynh Saigon, South Vietnam 

Mark Linzey Jennette Monroe 

Mark David Jones Lillington 

Thomas Orazio Joynt Fort Washington, MD 

Yaw Asare Karikari Accra, Ghana 

**Patricia Kay Key Cedar Grove 

David Allen Koepnick Washington 

**Jeffrey Todd Lawrence Camden 

*Karl Thomas Leinfelder Chapel Hill 

Cedric David Lewis Annapolis, MD 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

27 



Charles Chiang Mah Raleigh 

Paul Leon Massengill, Jr Asheboro 

*Dayn Clinton McBee Greensboro 

***Paul Glenn McKee Raleigh 

Douglas Keith Melzer High Point 

Michael Dean Moore Havelock 

*Michael Wayne Murdock Denver 

Terryne Felyce Murphy Fayetteville 

Tushar Amrut Nakhre Wilson 

Kathleen Frances Newberg Efland 

Dung Si Nguyen Raleigh 

***Mark Neal Nolting Raleigh 

Jayesh Patel Franklinton 

♦Thanh Tien Pham Raleigh 

**Richard Ashley Purvis Bennett 

Randy Earl Quick Sanford 

Michael Stephen Ranieri Greensboro 

Janet Baldwin Raynor Raleigh 

Jefferson Reese, Jr Charlotte 

Kenneth Wade Rich Brevard 

***Patrick Joseph Richardson Boone 

Thomas Andrew Risser Charlotte 

♦John Douglas Roberts Spring Lake 

William Douglas Robertson Fayetteville 

William Martin Schwartz Charlotte 

James Christopher Sides Jacksonville 

Craig Lee Simmons Morehead City 

**Cynthia Carol Smith Mount Pleasant 

May Archie Stancil Castalia 

Brett Jay Stephenson Sanford 

Derrick Howard Taylor Charlotte 

David Bryan Turner Ridgecrest 

Ronald Steven Turner Charlotte 

Mohan Gopal Unnithan Kerala, India 

Quang The Van Rockville, MD 

*Katherine Elizabeth Violette Raleigh 

*David Cloud Wilkins Greensboro 

Jeffrey Allen Wilson Greenville 

Barry Wayne Wood, Jr High Point 

Scott Dwaine Woodard Raleigh 

***William Francis Yadusky Fayetteville 

**Lee Ann Zierenberg Atlanta, GA 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

***Michael Eugene Adams Maryville, TN 

**Robin Carol Ballard Durham 

**Julie Ann Bauer Asheville 

**Bhavna Harishchandra Bhakta Asheville 

***Steven Langley Blake Denville, NJ 

Dennis Ray Blanton Ellenboro 

Beryl Gaye Blount Greensboro 

Robert Allen Bolton Raleigh 

Kenneth Roy Bowen Raleigh 

Andre Pierre Bright Winston-Salem 

James William Bright Greenville 

Robert Mark Britt Goldsboro 



t Co-major "CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

28 



John Earl Cabaniss Shelby 

Seavy Wesley Carroll Fayetteville 

Mona Nichole Carter Dudley 

**Suk Chu Chan Greenville 

Ronnie Thomas Cheek Goldston 

***Joydeep Chowdhury Charlotte 

Tai Diep Chung Raleigh 

tSteven Mark Clements Raleigh 

*Dewey Edwin Cochran Waynesville 

**Jill Rena Comer Concord 

Brian Anthony Cox Asheboro 

**Alexander Berry Credle III Cary 

***Jeffrey William Crenshaw Charlotte 

Grason Pierce Curtis Lenoir 

Hazim Hashim Dahir Ramallah, Jordan 

William Bradley Davison Fallston, MD 

William Herbert Dean Fairfax, VA 

Moseph Wayne Dodd Durham 

Michael Christian Dougherty Matthews 

**James Christopher Eason Newport News, VA 

Roger Lee Edwards, Jr Goldsboro 

Timothy Stephen Fahey Apex 

*Eric Douglas Faison Richmond, VA 

Kenneth Allen Feldmann Raleigh 

Randall Lee Forester Concord 

John Wayne Freeze, Jr China Grove 

Katherine Camille Frye Garner 

Randall Whitaker Fulp Winston-Salem 

*Garry Ray Garver Garner 

Thomas Joseph Gibbons Cary 

***John Everett Gmuender Beech Mountain 

*Alexander James Golian Woodstock, NY 

**Robey David Greene Morganton 

**David Charles Hall Raleigh 

Keith Aaron Hardt Jacksonville 

Benjamin Isaac Harrison, Jr Salisbury 

Darren Jordan Hayes Raleigh 

Kevin Eugene Henderson Salisbury 

*Perrin Quarles Henderson, Jr Charlotte 

Kay Smith Hicks Charlotte 

**Perrin Jay Hirshman East Brunswick, NJ 

Jeffrey Lamar Holley Stapleton, GA 

Mark Shannon Howell Eden 

***Andrij Walter Huryn New Bern 

***Wade Eric Jackson Florence, SC 

Ammar Numan Jadallah Jerusalem, Palestine 

*Kosar A. Jaff Rome, Italy 

Gurpreet Singh Jawa Fayetteville 

Ivan Edward Johnson, Jr Richmond, VA 

*Kristian Marvin Johnson Wake Forest 

Winton Earl Kelly, Jr Durham 

Steven Dale Kershaw Raleigh 

Kenneth Sears Kirk Goldsboro 

Joseph Alan Konen Hope Mills 

Carol Ann Lancaster Maysville 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

29 



***Richard James Lewis Raleigh 

*Joseph McDuffie Lytton Durham 

Elizabeth Anne Madry Mooresville 

*Timothy John Mains Fayetteville 

**Rahdall James Martin Elberfeld, IN 

Ronald Robert Marx Raleigh 

Karen Marie McCarron Winston-Salem 

Patrick John McCarthy Fayetteville 

***Mark Bradley McCoy Albemarle 

Kenneth Lockworth McKinney, Jr Greensboro 

**Edwin Arthur Mead Owego, NY 

David Wesley Miller Wilmington 

Thomas David Mills Fayetteville 

t***William Kenneth Neighbors III Benson 

Joseph Michael Nolan Centereach, NY 

Peter Joseph Norton Graham 

Mark Palsha Burlington 

John Rouss Parks, Jr Burlington 

Susan Angela Parks Winston-Salem 

Vohn Nelson Peeler, Jr Faith 

Grover Calvin Perdue Fayetteville 

***Amir Pirzadeh Tehran, Iran 

Darin Andrew Pope Monroe 

Basil Shukri Qubain Cary 

Kimberly Dawn Ramseur High Point 

*Baeton Charles Rigsbee Durham 

***Charles Kenneth Robinson Charlotte 

Rickard Floyd Rodgers Kannapolis 

*Georges Farah Samaha Raleigh 

Tony Richard Sarno Matthews 

*James Frederick Schenck Salisbury 

***Steven Ernest Schulz Charlotte 

Jodie Elizabeth See High Point 

**Daniel Frank Selden Raleigh 

Kenneth Scott Shaffer Greensboro 

Bridget Parks Simpson Hillsborough 

fColin Robert Smith McLean, VA 

**Donald Gregg Smith Pfafftown 

***Steven Mark Snider Albemarle 

t**Brian Kent Spiro Raleigh 

Ella Louise Stainback Oxford 

*Kenneth Ray Steele, Jr Walkertown 

Glen Paul Stewart Asheville 

German Suarez Santa Cruz, Bolivia 

**Hugh Blake Svendsen Jacksonville 

Richard Dao Tan Hickory 

*John Markham Thompson Durham 

John Espenshade Titus Raleigh 

Ha Ngoc Tran Raleigh 

Tarn Van Tran Cary 

Richard Meaker Trask, Jr Raleigh 

John Herman Tripp Greenville 

Gregory Donald Turney Raleigh 

***Mark Stephen Viglianco Winston-Salem 

tDarrel Wade Vuncannon Greensboro 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude "'SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

30 



Michael Walsh Raleigh 

*Dawei Wang Macau 

John James Warwick Madison 

*Robert Louis Whatley Cary 

Kenneth Dwayne White Mocksville 

***Richard Lee Williams Charlotte 

Brian Drew Willoughby Jacksonville 

Barbara Katherine Wilson Kingston, NY 

**James Steven Worley Greenville 

*James Dudley Wright Charlotte 

Mark William Yalch Goldsboro 

***Derek Todd Young Winston-Salem 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING OPERATIONS 
Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Kevin Andrew McFalls High Point 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Philip Leroy Culpepper Charlotte 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Lola Floyd Shields Bennettsville, SC 

Cassandra Marietta Turnbull Cambria Heights, NY 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FURNITURE MANUFACTURING 
AND MANAGEMENT 

Degree Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Leon Scott Sartin Greensboro 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Herbert Lee Andrews III Archdale 

Carl Wayne Bundy Raeford 

Barry Howard Romberg Macungie, PA 

Kevin Eugene Ward Hickory 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

William Carl Blackmon High Point 

***Stephen Todd Browning Greensboro 

Michael James Cavanaugh Greensboro 

Linda Kay Church Raleigh 

John Darren Duffey Hudson 

Larry Scott Furr Sanford 

Thomas Christian Hart Collierville, TN 

Nathan Kevin Howie Fayetteville 

Robin Johnston Raleigh 

Dawn Marie Swanson Greensboro 

Albert Van Dorp, Jr Jamestown 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Cynthia Gillespie Elizabethtown 

*Mark Everett Keesling Bluefield, WV 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

31 



June Rose Lundgren Charlotte 

James Robert Sills Hickory 

Kenneth Edwin Waegerle Durham 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Robert Alan Beal Charlotte 

James Michael Coon King 

Candance Sequenta Debnam Raleigh 

Michael Cecil Futch Rocky Point 

*Ted Taylor King Mount Airy 

Deborah Suzanne Little Lenoir 

Pamela Elwillie Martin Union 

*Pamela Ann Mazak Newton 

**Krista Jean Peterson Hickory 

Bobby Keith Puckett Raleigh 

Tiffany Anne Traber Asheville 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

*Gregory Angelo Accardo Selden, NY 

Daniel Raymond Andolsen Cleveland, OH 

Kelli Jean Branson Wilmington 

Richard Bernard Clark Fayetteville 

Michael Boyd Dickenson Matthews 

Mark David Fuqua Eden 

Beverly Diane Gaskins New Bern 

Gary Douglas Gilbody Wilmington 

Breda Mary Grainger Raleigh 

Quanya LaJoyce Harshaw Lenoir 

James William Ingram, Jr Concord 

Kimberly Annette Katt Corning, NY 

Michael Owen Kelly Hendersonville 

Angela Dawn Lancaster Hendersonville 

William Fred Lewis, Jr Belmont 

Teri Michelle Loyd Cary 

Sylvia Denise McClain Durham 

*William Joseph Plunket III Wahiawa, HI 

Robert Shannon Riddle Jacksonville 

f**Andreas Iacovos Sawa Phterykoudhi, Cyprus 

Timothy Edwin Scronce Goldsboro 

*Michael Lewis Singletary Hamlet 

***George Robert Smith Raleigh 

Kalyn Mia Teno Charlotte 

Mamie Wrenn Wells Wilson 

Dawn Sullivan Whitley Springfield, VA 

Gena Anne Woodard Graham 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

James Fontaine Allen, Jr Raleigh 

Rodrigo Avila San Salvador, El Salvador 

*Vivian Diane Best Pikeville 

Steven Vonderlehr Boehling Wilmington 

Brian Martin Bridges Gastonia 

Jeffrey Allen Buckley Endwell, NY 

Gwendolyn Michele Chisholm Asheville 

Connie Denise Collins Charlotte 

*Morinee Michalle Cooper Southern Pines 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude '"SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

32 



Jeffrey William Ferrell Greensboro 

Matthew Shaw Furin Fayetteville 

Kelly Jean Gainer Potomac, MD 

Thomas Mark Geshay Arden 

*David William Gilbert Catawba 

t***Timothy Leon Grady Winston-Salem 

Wayne Thomas Heverly Fayetteville 

Janette Marie Hopkins Newport Beach, CA 

Christopher Eric Hultgren Oak Ridge, TN 

***Frederick Richard Indermaur Greensboro 

Debra Victoria King Winston-Salem 

Timothy Eugene Lash Walnut Cove 

Kimberly Anne Lawton Summit, NJ 

*Mark Anthony Lawton Tobaccoville 

Jacqueline Patrick Lester Durham 

Tasha Colette Marshall Charlotte 

Laura Ann Meyer Charlotte 

**Margaret Rose Mihalik Boca Raton, FL 

David James Miller Bethesda, MD 

Patrick James Murray Richmond, VA 

Mary Elizabeth Nardone Lutherville, MD 

Heidi Lyn Neuschwanger Pinebluff 

Jeffrey Todd Newmark Cherry Hill, NJ 

*Todd Mitchell, Reid Grand Cayman, British West Indies 

Peggy Johanne Reme Jenkintown, PA 

Sheldon Leroy Riggs Clayton 

Michael Brian Robinson Charlotte 

Kimberly Gayle Rowland Durham 

Vicky Ruffin Kenly 

*Christine Mary Sitko Raleigh 

t**Brian Kent Spiro Raleigh 

*Mary Roberta Swearingen Charlotte 

Samuel Lee Thomason Winston-Salem 

William Howard Treadaway Charlotte 

Donna Garris White Rockingham 

***Gail Lynn Whitehouse Geneva, FL 

Barry Dean Wilson Fletcher 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATERIALS SCIENCE 
AND ENGINEERING 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Robert Edward Dalton, Jr Lewisville 

Floyd Phillip Fisher, Jr Charlotte 

Dean Dwight Hackett New Castle, PA 

Michael Thomas McClure Cary 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Tammy Faye Barnes Kenly 

***Paul Raymond Besser Dallastown, PA 

William Allen Bingham Raleigh 

*Winston Scott Blackley Wilmington 

*Rebecca Joann Derro Cheverly, MD 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

33 



Jay Filmore Ford Lenoir 

Barbara Jean Gilbert Lincolnton 

Joachim Gruss Arden 

Weaver Ballou Haney Canton 

Mary Luann Harmon Lincolnton 

Evone Faye Hartgrove Greensboro 

Mark William Lee Kannapolis 

Thomas Theodore Mabry Albemarle 

Michael Allen Masser Cary 

Gregory Edwin Mills Raleigh 

♦♦♦Jane Felton Nally Charlotte 

Thomas Albert Shepard Canton 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

♦"Jonathan Frederick DeSerres Chapel Hill 

Matthew Lee Hamilton Raleigh 

Randy Alan Hight Franklinton 

*LaMoyne Phillips Mix, Jr Wilmington 

Jeffrey Todd Narron Wilson 

David Glenn Robertson Roanoke Rapids 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Jonathan Guy Elder Claremont 

Jody Michael Hartsell Stanley 

Jae Yung Kim Greensboro 

Tan Le Raleigh 

Robert LeVan McCollum Concord 

Karen Joy Miller Scotia, NY 

*Jeffery Stephen Plemmons Waynesville 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

*Paul Franklin Augustitus Arlington, VA 

James Allen Austin III High Point 

♦Michael Robert Austin Kernersville 

Lee Allen Barger Hickory 

♦♦Freddie Lee Bazen, Jr Murfreesboro 

Christopher Allen Beall Matthews 

fSurojini Meera Bhikhai Cary 

Kelly Lee Bishop Belmont 

Bonita Elizabeth Boseman Goldsboro 

♦Robert Allen Boyette Wilson 

♦Robert Brown, Jr Asheville 

Alan Lawrence Burcham Thomasville 

Daniel Gilbert Burns Charlotte 

Michael John Chapoton Morehead City 

♦♦Dimitra P Collias Matthews 

♦Christopher Gene Cross, Jr Forest City 

Aubrey Thomas Davis, Jr Winston-Salem 

Robert Hamilton Dawkins, Jr Fayetteville 

Joseph Lee Degraff Greensboro 

♦Todd Franklin Denman Bryson City 

♦♦Joseph Francis Xavier Doman Asheboro 

Steven Spence Dowdy Greensboro 

♦♦♦Daniel Gilbert Durham Dobson 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

34 



Charles Patrick Eakes Greensboro 

*George William Fleming III Charlotte 

*James Kevin Frady [" Clyde 

***Barbara Joann Gerth [[]] ! Whispering Pines 

Gary Lance Goodson Monroe 

Rajendra Nana Gowin Raleigh 

Kathy Dianne Grant Taylorsville 

Glenn Ray Gunter II Sanford 

William Theodore Harris III Canandaigua, NY 

*Robert Eugene Hawkins Wilson 

Wilson Richard Hayworth Salisbury 

Craig Allen Henry .*.'.' MJddletown, OH 

Jason Leon Hodges Dobson 

Robert Larkin Hutchins Siloam 

*Russell Brian Jones Pembroke 

Kenneth Stuart Klawonn Raleigh 

David Alan Koukol [[[[[[ Richmond, VA 

James William Lackey Lenoir 

**Douglas Frank LeRoy !!!.!.... Cary 

Stephen Alan Lowe .'.'.' Cincinnati, OH 

**Susan Alane Lyerly Denver 

Jeffrey Rehr Mateer \' m Saint Davids, PA 

*Richard Eugene McFarling, Jr Danville VA 

*David Brian McNeill Laurinburg 

Tony Earl McNeill Siler City 

Martin Jerome O'Connell Huntington, WV 

Michael Paul Oliver p or t Myers, FL 

William Harvey Payne III Madison 

Jose Ramon Perurena, Jr Panama, Panama 

*Jeffrey Todd Poteat Marion 

William Mark Poteat Raleigh 

Murray Guy Rudisill []]]]] Winston-Salem 

Jeffrey Robert Russell Winston-Salem 

t Andreas Lacovos Sawa Phterkoudhi, Cyprus 

James Glen Schwefel Winnabow 

Ryan Matthew Sell Sanford 

Fred Robert Setzer !."!!!.'.'!.'!.'"!!! Gastonia 

Dwayne Eric Sloan Lexington 

Leonard White Thaggard Clinton 

"ChauMinhTran ! ! ! Raeford 

**Scott Yonkers Utesch Charlotte 

Carlos Manuel Vasquez-Segura 'La Ceiba, Honduras 

John Brian Whisenant Lexington 

Kenneth Mark Wilhelm ' " Salisbury 

*£r an ? ela w ynn Wilkins '/.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.. Durham 

*Michael Leon Woods Durham 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Harold Charles Albo, Jr Orangeburg, SC 

Robert Carl Alridge III Richmond, VA 

**Jeffrey Stuart Armfield Cary 

William Todd Barnes ".".".'."."!.'!! Rockingham 

*John Andrew Bartle, Jr Raleigh 

Michael John Bloser Forest City 

John Richard Bresko Hollywood Fl 

Mitchell Andrew Brown Winston-Salem 

William Harry Charles Spencer 

t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude "*SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



35 



Mark Kendall Cheek Clemmons 

David Anthony Chester Raleigh 

Charles Lee Chilton Winston-Salem 

**David Wayne Cole Lumberton 

Patricia Ann Coley Raleigh 

Kathryn Covert Roanoke, VA 

Robert Todd Creekmore Old Fort 

Tyson Forrest Crowell Spencer 

John Eward Davis Mount Ulla 

Thomas Alexius Davis Raleigh 

*Erik Leonard Dixon Oak Ridge 

James Todd Earl Lawndale 

Edward Earl Evans Wilmington 

**Troy Allen Everhart Winston-Salem 

Yusef Fahmy Raleigh 

*Patrick Andrew Ferguson High Point 

John Quintin Gant Burlington 

**James Andrew Grant Charlotte 

**Kenneth Lee Greenwood Mount Olive, NJ 

*Mark Joseph Gross Asheboro 

Darwin Allen Hadley Hope Mills 

Bruce Ryan Hardman Kinston 

Dale Myrick Harward Oakboro 

Gary Glenn Hellard Charlotte 

Joseph Neil Henkel Hickory 

**Randy Lynn Hodge Marshall 

|t **Lysa Marie Holbrook Louisville, OH 

Clayton Moore House Plymouth 

James Wilson Hull Flat Rock 

*William Michael Humbles Watha 

Joseph Earl Hunter, Jr Kinston 

**Michael Alton Hurley Asheboro 

Peter Daniel Hutcherson Winston-Salem 

**Laura Clare Jackson Charlotte 

Francis Augustus Jefferson III Wilson 

**Kazuya Kawamura Albemarle 

Kurtis Pierce Keller Mebane 

Patty Sue Knio Raleigh 

Craig John Kuppler Youngsville 

**Luis Patricio Lara Raleigh 

Delia Rose Laviner Durham 

Michael Antoine Lee Raleigh 

Gregory I. Leifer Silver Spring, MD 

Mitchell Todd Lineberry East Bend 

Forrest Kimball London Greensboro 

James Jordan Long Taylorsville 

*Kyle Warren Loeske Raleigh 

Brentley Mark Lovick Raleigh 

Thomas Eugene Lowery Tampa, FL 

Michael Wayne Loy Gibsonville 

Robert Howell Lunney Waynesboro, VA 

**Mark Edward Marler Charleston, SC 

Kelvin Shearl Martin Walkertown 

Fred Mclntyre Troy 

Jerry Richard McKeithan, Jr Forest City 

Michael Philip McMahon Mars Hill 

James Brian Miller Newark, DE 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude "'SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

36 



Tyler Bruce Moore Parkersbrug, WV 

Glenn Junius Morgan Henderson 

Steven Allen Murr Thomasville 

*Amy Regen Myhre Garner 

*George Beechum O'Briant, Jr Roxboro 

Alan Durand Outlaw Fayetteville. 

Clifford Burgess Perry Rocky Mount 

***William Neal Pickett Durham 

Gerald Steven Ratchford Charlotte 

**George Woodliff Sanford Union, SC 

***Mark Daniel Schmidt Greenville 

Michael Glenn Schnupper Columbia, SC 

**Michael Craig Scott Roxboro 

***Robert Norman Sharpe III Greensboro 

fColin Robert Smith McLean, VA 

Thomas Clark Smith Erie, PA 

*Todd Nelson Snider Asheboro 

Norman Punzalon Soberano Cherry Hill, NJ 

Walter Larry Sowers, Jr Lewisville 

*Stephen Haines Speck Raleigh 

Ronda Diane Stamey Valdese 

Insil Pollock Sullivan Kinston 

Dennis Ray Taylor Lincolnton 

Gregory Scott Taylor West Jefferson 

Brian Howard Teague Winston-Salem 

*Walter Franklin Teeter Mooresville 

Paul Craig Thomas Charlotte 

June Marie Tracy Albemarle 

Pablo Ivan Vaca Raleigh 

*David Paul Van Emburg Kinnelon, NJ 

Paul Marcel Vinay Connelly Springs 

***William Ben Warren Greensboro 

Ronnie Clarence Watson Hudson 

Robert Worthington Weathers Charlotte 

Robin Lea Weeks Morehead City 

*Robin Anthony Yates Winston-Salem 

Alan Keith Young Raleigh 

***Thomas Wade Young Richmond, VA 

Christian Donald Zearfoss Wilmington 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 
Degree Conferred June 2J*, 1987 

Mark Ellis Metcalf Cherryville 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

**Christa Elizabeth Boman Pittsburgh, PA 

Mark Randall Lewis Spring Lake 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

*Sandra Lynn Abbey Forest City 

*Ala Fayez Al-Zaben Haifa, Palestine 

Sven Oliver Bader Naarden, the Netherlands 

Gregory Ross Boehling Richmond, VA 



t Co-major "CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

37 



Wayne Frederick Couch Wilmington 

*Shawn Kent Gibby Gastonia 

Maria Sonia Gutierrez Portugalete, Spain 

*James William Kraus Winston-Salem 

Ronald Charles Kurtz North Bellmore, NY 

Billy Linwood Lee, Jr Fayetteville 

Michael James Pierce Troy 

Edwin Duard Price Lenoir 

Alisa Lorraine Ramey Gastonia 

*Eric William Rumfelt Shelby 

Julie Anne Todd Whitehouse Station, NJ 



College of Forest Resources 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CONSERVATION 

Jointly administered by the College of Forest Resources and the College of Agri- 
culture and Life Sciences. 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

John H'earl Martindale Charlotte 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY 
Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Stephen Todd Booher Farmville 

***Kimala Leigh Dills Durham 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

John William McMinn Brevard 

Michael Louis Spicer Durham 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Clare Marie Dellwo Lynchburg, VA 

Bradford Lee McConnell Greensboro 

Charles Glynn McRae Kenly 

Mark Vernon Pearson Morganton 

•Jill Theresa Power Little Silver, NJ 

David Michael Urgo Crownsville, MD 

William Austin Wright Morganton 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

*Gwen Winifred Amick Ann Arbor, MI 

Thomas Sherwood Berg Wilton, CT 

Andrew Todd Carswell Morganton 

Robert Banty Chenoweth Henrico 



t Co-major "Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude "'SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

38 



John Michael Cox Rockville, MD 

William Deems Currie, Jr Durham 

Stanley Warren Hales Sanford 

John Phillip Howard Wilmington 

Frederick William Hoyt III Elizabeth City 

William Edward Josey Charlotte 

James Michael Powell Hazelwood 

Kevin Dale Ray Nakina 

*Larry Eugene Ridenhour Concord 

Marietta Leora Singleton Wilmington 

James Alan Tootle Hesperia, CA 

Floyd Wiley Whitley Nashville 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE 
AND TECHNOLOGY 

Degrees Conferred June 2k, 1987 

Barbara Jo Gilmore Raleigh 

Jerry Stephen Hall, Jr Clyde 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

John Andrew Frazier Asheboro 

James Allen Stuber Southern Pines 

Timothy Gardner Tompkins Roanoke Rapids 

Benjamin Powell White Conway 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Mohamad Jamil Abuhasan Perak, Malaysia 

fJanet Ann Black Atlanta, GA 

fSusan Lee Davis Palatko, Fl 

t*Jasdev Singh Gill Augusta, GA 

fStephanie Riddick Miller Hobbsville 

Wendi Ann Wood Richmond, VA 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Tony Lane Baker Hope Mills 

James Edward Bradbury Lufkin, TX 

Charles Eugene Brinkley Covington, VA 

fAnne Winter Callender Pensacola, FL 

*Barry Olin Covington Canton 

Scott Page Le Grand Richmond, VA 

Gerald Wayne Marks Cameron 

Timothy Alan Nuckols Glen Allen, VA 

fKai Erik Simonsen Raleigh 

fMaureen Kaye Spears Onemo, VA 

Milan Kent Thomas Nahunta, GA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RECREATION RESOURCES 
ADMINISTRATION 

Degrees Conferred June 2k, 1987 

Kellie Lynn Beeson Akron, OH 

Deborah Ann George Pompano Beach, FL 

Martha Jacqueline Mitchell Raleigh 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude *** Summa Cum Laude H Honors Program 

39 



Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Charles Richard Crockford Charlotte 

Dianne Louise Edris Raleigh 

Mark Bell Franklin Christiansburg, VA 

Robert Joseph Harris III Raleigh 

Christina Lee Woodings Burlington 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Leslie Carol Armstrong North Augusta, SC 

Trina Lynne Davis Welcome 

Angela Demetris Daye Conway 

John Michael Fagala Gastonia 

Tina Michelle Forbes Kings Mountain 

Edward Burr Henriksen Elkins, WV 

Cynthia Ann Lee Norwood 

Eugene Daryl Myers Willow Springs 

Joseph Timothy Nesbitt Asheville 

Dwayne Cameron Patterson Powells Point 

Laura Fitzgerald Potts Mount Olive 

Mark Alan Ralston Cary 

Benjamin Douglas Simpson Charlotte 

*Michael Wendell Wetzel Havelock 

Junius Rufus Wrenn III Roanoke Rapids 

Michael Thomas Yonk Cary 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Thomas Andrew Baldridge Saltville, VA 

William Odie Hicks, Jr Raleigh 

Chase Wescott Lassiter, Jr Greensboro 

Charlynne Drucilla Todd Charlotte 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN WOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 
Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Bryan Perry Bass Edenton 

Mark Patrick Winter Sandston, VA 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Ying-Ming Wu Changwa, Taiwan 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Craig Lloyd Forbes Elizabeth City 

Peter Reinhard Kolf Ridgefield, CT 

fAndy Cade Norton Whiteville 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Alex John Dean Goldsboro 

Bradley Charles Earnhardt Gold Hill 

Mary Angela Freuler Candler 

Kevin Douglas Griffin Williamston 

Warren Earl Lupton Morehead City 

♦Kenneth Wayne Odom, Jr Severn 

Norman Royce Vann, Jr Conway 

Briant Albert Wilder Asheboro 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

40 



College of Humanities and 
Social Sciences 




BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ACCOUNTING 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Lisa Marie Carter Omaha, NE 

Dorothy Carolyn Clement Charlotte 

Christopher Walden Gongaware Richmond, VA 

**Lisa Carol Jenkins Henderson 

Jeffrey Hardy Pilcher Beaufort 

Karen Ann Spiegelberg Morehead City 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Bradford Morgan Brady Raleigh 

Sandra Faye Colson South Mills 

Thomas Eliot Goerke II Seaford, NY 

*Rebecca Garrett Hoover Raleigh 

**Todd Allen Rodeniser Utica, OH 

*June Mariash Scott Raleigh 

Cindy Jo Talley Fuquay-Varina 

James Floyd Turner III Raleigh 

Jennifer Leigh Walston Wilson 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Sherry Rita Aronson Cary 

Charles Latham Barker Clinton 

Angela Lux Blough Raleigh 

Nancy Lynn Brown Raleigh 

Dorothy Sue Burns Harrells 

John Adam DApolito Far Hills, NJ 

tJanet Dease Baltimore, MD 

Mary Robin Edge Fayetteville 

**Katherine Anne Fernald Autryville 

fVicki Flynn Gavin Raleigh 

Amy Kathryn Gibbs Winterville 

*Lisa Gay Goolsby Selma 

Beverly Anne Griffin Winston-Salem 

***Nada Khoury Hanna Raleigh 

Arnette Cassandra Hawley Oxford 

Curtis Franklin Holshouser Mount Airy 

Kwame Acheampong Karikari Raleigh 

Lisa Burnett Keith Greensboro 

fKatrina Denise King Hendersonville 

Teresa Dawn Leonard Lexington 

Michael James Lord Raleigh 

tJohn Patrick McNally Fayetteville 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

41 



Tracy Lynn Miller Sanford 

Lori Susan Mitchum Matthews 

James Christopher Morgan Goldsboro 

tRichard Wayne Musselwhite China Grove 

Vandinh Nguyen Raleigh 

**Laura Michele Nixon Statesville 

tDavid William Norby Raleigh 

Gregory Winston Owen Fayetteville 

Ellen Camille Payne Wilkesboro 

*Mark Andrew Pearson Melrose Park, IL 

John Robert Sharpe Randolph, NJ 

Talmage Tolly Spence III Charlotte 

Virginia Lisa Steele Winston-Salem 

Robin Elise Thomas Raleigh 

James Carson Welch, Jr Raleigh 

Russell Eugene Zalascek Fayetteville 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Janet Elaine Andrews Concord 

Randall Charles Angel Sanford 

Gena Lynnette Barnes Creedmoor 

James Arthur Bass Red Oak 

fLisa Marie Beeman Chocowinity 

Joel Thomas Beeson Lexington 

♦♦Jeffrey Franklin Boyd Gastonia 

John Edward Boyle Reisterstown, MD 

Jennifer Layne Bracken Sanford 

Angela Levette Brown Whiteville 

*Cathy Marie Bunyard Cary 

fCynthia Marie Burns Fayetteville 

♦♦♦Kelly Moore Carter Raleigh 

♦Daniel Ray Chappell ,i Dale, IN 

Thomas Lee Churchwell, Jr Cary 

Timothy Wayne Cody Fuquay-Varina 

David Leon Currie Kannapolis 

Wendy Renee Cushman Jacksonville 

tRoswitha Garcia Damm Raleigh 

William Roy Davis, Jr Elm City 

*Melanie Lynn Digeso Jackson, NJ 

Scott Orander Douglas Winston-Salem 

Linwood Corry Faulconer Smithfield 

Susan Turnage Ferguson Siler City 

**Rebecca Ann Gallagher Willow Springs 

Bruce Howard Garner Raleigh 

Thomas Gebbia, Jr Sanford 

***Susan Gail Gooch Creedmore 

Augustus Steele Hall, Jr Asheboro 

*Suanne Renee Halleen Louisville, KY 

♦♦Anne Allen Handlon Cary 

James Harry Hayne Raleigh 

*Nancy Joyce Hedgepeth Henderson 

**Marcia Gale Hedrick Harmony 

Douglas Jacob Heinz Hickory 

♦Robert Wayne Hester Durham 

Walter Edward Hilliard Wilson 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude *"SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

42 



Stacia Lynn Holt Asheville 

tJoseph Cameron Hughes Henderson 

t***Sheri Lorraine Jackson Henderson 

Karen Jessen Mount Holly 

***Sanja Sue Kennedy Phoenix, AZ 

fDon Blakley Leonhardt Vale 

tDavid Bryant Lucas Lucama 

Laketha Michelle Marley Whiteville 

*Michael Thomas Marshall Wilson 

Teresa Ann Martin Fort Lauderdale, FL 

Donna Carol Massengill Four Oaks 

fJohn Joseph McHugh Raleigh 

Craig Anderson Moss Roanoke Rapids 

Christine Michele Mueller Raleigh 

tGregory Ray Myers Thomasville 

Pamela Etu O'Herrick Raleigh 

t*Joseph Yates Parker III Raleigh 

Lori Louise Peterson Great Lakes, IL 

tRichard Hunt Reifschneider Raleigh 

Sonya Carole Settlemyre Newton 

***Christopher Robert Simmons Charlotte 

James Scott Simpson Burlington 

*Gary Franklin Slabach Lexington 

*Teresa Greeson Smith Gibsonnville 

Charlene Annette Sorrell Durham 

Michele Renee Sparrow Cary 

Jonathan Glen Strickland Raleigh 

Ann Lohr Swing Lexington 

Karen Lynn Thomas Snow Camp 

tStephon Terrell Thompson Spring Lake 

tDale Edwin Tiffany Raleigh 

*Michelle Marie Vaccaro Princeton, NJ 

Anne Taylor Walker Summerfield 

*Linda Carol Walters Raleigh 

Richard Lyle Weeks Cary 

tThomas Henry Weir III Winston-Salem 

Harold Dwayne Whinery Fayetteville 

Angela Lacy White Wilson 

tSherry Kay Wright Gastonia 

*Christine Elizabeth Wunderly Virginia Beach, VA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Elizabeth Leigh Almand Winston-Salem 

Pamela Jean Askey Charlotte 

Betty Clark Bargoil Gastonia 

*Ann Marie Buettner West Allis, WI 

fKeary Cavin IV Cary 

Steven Reid Citty Reidsville 

Bobby Thomas Dunn, Jr Nashville 

Paige Allison Ellis Lexington 

Elaine Carol Fanjoy Raleigh 

Elizabeth Carol Golder Wrightsville Beach 

tWendell Ray Hodge Yadkinville 



t Co-major "CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

43 



tRobert Jon Hopfenberg Raleigh 

Katherine Chauncey Huffine Greensboro 

Gary James Jaluvka Pittsburg, PA 

William Bartley Kennedy Raleigh 

Jon Miller LaMachio Greensboro 

Kelly Susan Long Raleigh 

tTodd Kendrick Minchew Wallace 

Eric Clayvon Nixon Four Oaks 

Michael John Petellin Enumclaw, WA 

fHilda Marie Robinson Raleigh 

Teresa Powell Sessoms Southern Pines 

Jeffery Wayne Smith Roanoke Rapids 

Ray Gordon Smith, Jr Benson 

*Margaret Jill Thomas Moncure 

tJeri Lynn Walter Greenville 

fScott Eric Weiser Mooresville 

Gordon Rawlings White III New Bern 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

tAnthony Mark Allen Wake Forest 

Jonathan Porter Babb Greenville 

Hector Currie Batchelor Red Springs 

tSheryl Yvette Briscoe Charlotte 

fNicole Marlisa Chatman Orange, NJ 

tAshley Annette Collins Warsaw 

Angie Cotten Angier 

tKatheryn Lynn Felton Rocky Mount 

Tammy Lynn Frazier Raleigh 

Betsy Deanna Gentry King 

tRobert Benton Brightwell Glasgow IV Raleigh 

Sheila Anita Godfrey Elizabeth City 

Robert Walker Hazell Richmond, VA 

Judith Ginsberg Hiatt Raleigh 

tMary Lloyd Hodges Henderson 

tAldwyn Christopher Isley Louisberg 

Charles Shelby Jones Cary 

fJackson Marie Jordan Rocky Mount 

tMark Jon Marrocco McClean, VA 

Ernest Edward Mason III Charlotte 

John Edgar Maynard Greensboro 

Tammy Lavonne Mayo Raleigh 

*Leigh Ann McClure Raleigh 

Kimberly White McGlohon Greenville 

Scott Thomas McGuinn Greensboro 

William Jack Medford Lake Junaluska 

Vera Elaine Miller Fayetteville 

Michael Edward Mooney Somerville, NJ 

•fTerri Lynn Pruitt Wilson 

fSandra Kay Reid Winston-Salem 

Charles Lindsey Richardson Tabor City 

fSusan Elizabeth Roeber Boca Raton, Fl 

t*William Kevin Swartz Sanford 

Bradley Scott Underdal Winston-Salem 

fKevin Michael Wade Raleigh 

Kimberly Kersey Watson Durham 

fJohn Charles Welch Pfafftown 

Melissa Ann Williamson Charlotte 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

44 



Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

tCarleton Scott Andrew Asheville 

tJohn Casey Andrews Rockville, MD 

Anthony Gene Barefoot Raeford 

Harvey Craig Barefoot Raleigh 

Robert Marshall Blackmon Greensboro 

tEric Scott Blumenthal Chatham, NJ 

Todd Warner Bone Raleigh 

Andrea Antoinette Breazeale Winston-Salem 

Lisa Faye Briggs Roanoke Rapids 

t***Ralph Timothy Bryan Roanoke, VA 

t*Dawn Marie Burnett Rockville, MD 

tKimberly Lynn Cagle Claremont 

Linda Sue Canaday Four Oaks 

Selvan Thirumalaiswamy Chettiar Durham 

Michael Anthony Cillo Raleigh 

*Jody Lynn Cloninger \ Gastonia 

John Nicholas Cokinos Chevy Chase, MD 

tJacqwendlyn Marlene Coleman Fayetteville 

Gary Douglas Cook Hickory 

Eric Steven Corbett Raleigh 

fNorman Edward Corkhill Manassas, VA 

Jeffrey Lee Curtis Charlotte 

James Edwin Dale Raleigh 

fWilliam Thomas Daughtrey III Medford, NJ 

Kristi Michelle Davis Asheboro 

tJanet Dease Baltimore, MD 

tEric Todd Denham Salisbury 

tTamara Leigh Dooley Carolina Beach 

Blake Carlisle Doty Winston-Salem 

t Anthony Lee Downs Thomasville 

tChibuzor Emmanuel Ehilegbu Aba, Nigeria 

Lisa Ann Elium Salisbury 

tKimberly Ann Evans Charlotte 

Matthew David Evans Charlotte 

"Tena James Fabrizio Cary 

Torin Lane Fury Raleigh 

Bruce Howard Garner Wake Forest 

tVicki Flynn Gavin Raleigh 

Richard Gray Gentry Durham 

tBrandon Keith Gerringer Raleigh 

Kurt Graham Gibson Knightdale 

tAnthony Joseph Giuli Raleigh 

tCheryl Denise Goodman Wilson 

Elizabeth Ann Granger Southern Pines 

Bonita Denise Greene Greensboro 

Sandra Black Grey Winston-Salem 

Susan Carolyn Harriss Henderson 

Paul Robert Heide Norfolk, VA 

tKimberly Ann Heisey .' . . .Charlotte 

tMichael John Hickey Richardson, TX 

tJohnnie Dewey Hodges III Topsail Beach 

tFloyd Lofton Howell, Jr Raleigh 

Gartha Ingram III Fayetteville 

David Henry Johnson Fayetteville 

tTimothy Lee Joines Clemmons 

tRobert Joseph Kearney Raleigh 

t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***Summa Cum Laude H Honors Program 

45 



** r 



t*Walter Richard Kelly III Charlotte 

tKatrina Denise King Hendersonville 

Cooper Dave Kunkel IV New Bern 

Perry Joseph Leblond Jacksonville 

Tracy Lynn Legrand Fayetteville 

David Jonathan Levy Newtown, PA 

Matthew Frank Lewis Wilmington 

tPamela Letitia Lindsey Lumberton 

Barry Scott Lingafelt Winston-Salem 

t***Catherine Helen Lloyd Cary 

Sharon Mayers Charlotte 

Maureen Elizabeth McCain Milton 

Abbot Henderson McClintic Raleigh 

fThomas Dean McGhee Yadkinville 

tJohn Patrick McNally Fayetteville 

tMacon Warfield Michaux. Jr Goldsboro 

tClaudia Renate Mitchell Arlington, VA 

Michael Brown Mizelle Raleigh 

*Edward Dale Moolenaar Arden 

Kevin Hill Moore Monroe 

fRichard Wayne Musselwhite China Grove 

tDavid William Norby Raleigh 

Karen Marie Oglesby Williamston 

Debra Lynn Ondrus Wheaton, IL 

Melissa Jane Owens Jacksonville 

Jerry Wayne Parrish, Jr Gastonia 

Stephen Douglas Pindell Raleigh 

tMary Hope Poole Raleigh 

Charles Franklin Potts, Jr Manassas, VA 

Kim Spach Powell Raleigh 

tNahida Lea Price Raleigh 

tRitchie Wynne Ray Albuquerque, NM 

*Marcia Beverly Resnick Raleigh 

Gary Michael Ruess Raleigh 

tDavid Graig Salmon Raleigh 

***William Carl Shaver Grand Island, NE 

James Kendall Shaw Roxboro 

"("Jonathan Andrew Shelton Winston-Salem 

t***Stacey Lynn Smith Cary 

John Louis Spirek Springfield, VA 

Scott Roland Strong Charlotte 

Robert Baxter Thompson, Jr Jacksonville 

Tammy Ollie Tillman Bonlee 

Cynthia Rae Todd Charlotte 

Daniel Edward Todd Annandale, NJ 

Kathleen Ann Unterberger Tucson, AZ 

tVonda Kaye Villines Hurdle Mills 

Mark Steven Vollinger Pittsfield, MA 

Gregory Guy Walker Raleigh 

Selena Ann Wall Greensboro 

t*Brooks Lee Warren Spruce Pine 

tSteven Kent Whitfield Cary 

Caryl Ruth Williams Cary 

tMichael Kirk Wilson Raleigh 

Troy Donnell Wright Edenton 

Louise Brinson Yelle Raleigh 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude '"SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

46 



**1 



**1 



Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

James Everette Abernethy Marion 

Kimberly Rene Anderson Cary 

t**Sharon Sullivan Aspden Raleigh 

Whitney Louisa Barnes Durham 

fJames Alexander Barnwell III Burlington 

Stephanie Baron '.'.'.'.'.'.'.... Raleigh 

fr ranees Denise Bass Roseboro 

tCarolyn Carmontry Bates [[ Fort Bragg 

*Lisa Rose Baumgartner Rockville MD 

JLisa Marie Beeman Chocowinity 

tAshlea Ennis Benner Fayetteville 

Chris Anthony Benson Toms River, NJ 

tRichard David Benson t J~ n A 

Larry Bernstein Raleigh 

Michael Anthony Bierman [ Washington 

Laure Malosky Bowen Raleigh 

+ **5 aniel i e n- is g ramlett '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. !!.'.' Charlotte 

t**Bnan Phillip Brauns Pleasant Garden 

f ?« an K ^ Br T^ er Chapel Hill 

Jeffrey Edward Bross Hartford 

fGary Neville Buchanan Franklin 

Ken Thomas Buchanan Brevard 

Martha Joe Buffaloe '[ ' * _ Garner 

Andrew Ike Bullard Raleigh 

Julie Alice Bumgarner Newton 

tCynthia Marie Burns .!.'.'!".".'" Fayetteville 

Lisa Christine Cabler Highlands 

Kelly Anne Carlyle Fayetteville 

William Robert Cauley III Holly Ridge 

Melody Yvonne Cherry Bethel 

Carole Ann Cochran ...... Pineville 

*Barbara Sue Coffin Durham 

Stephen Peter Conger '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. '.'.'. '.'.'. '.['. '. Kensington 

TAndrew Malcolm Cooper High Point 

Mennifer Lynn Cotten ] Oxford 

o 1111 ! ^y Grumpier Y^Y^'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. Fayetteville 

Russell Clay Curtis Charlotte 

Elizabeth Donleycott Dale Raleigh 

Frank Payne Davis IV Rumson 

fThomas Hilton Deadmore Richmond VA 

tLouis Scott Dettman ''/'_ Rocky M ' ount 

Tern Lynn Diemer Burlington 

tRobert Franklin Dixon Matthews 

X am ! ,a r Tuck J? Unn Timberlake 

t5 av,d A Victor Dupont Raleigh 

JKyle Andrew Edwards Iron Station 

TI homas Fain Eller, Jr Asheville 

Angela Sue Featherston Charlotte 

tMargaret Dare Fogleman []][] Burlington 

tKarenLuanne Fowler Winston-Salem 

1 odd Branton Gaines Raleigh 



*** 



t Co-major *CumLaude " Magna Cum Laude '"SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

47 



Richard Anthony Gallo Cary 

Jeffrey David Gans Charlotte 

fPatricia Tran Garrett Fayetteville 

fRobert Earl Garris, Jr Roanoke Rapids 

Jacqueline Prior Gibbons Charlotte 

fMyron Shawn Godette New Bern 

Jane Kathryn Goellner Vienna, VA 

t*Karen Rene Gray Knightdale 

Blair Meta Gunter Raleigh 

Richard Brian Hall Denton 

Arnette Cassandra Hawley Oxford 

tMary Elizabeth Hayes Charleston, SC 

tCharles Heath Helms Peachland 

Frederick Raymond Hemphill Charlotte 

tChristopher Aaron Hill Cary 

tLisa Ann Hodnett Raleigh 

Allen Wade Holmes Franklinton 

tJoseph Cameron Hughes Henderson 

Gregory Alan Hunter Brevard 

t*Cathy Annette Hurlocker Raleigh 

tDaniel Joseph Jacobs Raleigh 

JDonna Caroline Jobe Matthews 

tGeorge Jones Kenly 

James Hilbert Jones, Jr Lumberton 

fMack Davis Jones Greensboro 

fMarwan Salah Juma Rome, Italy 

Maria Kanos Raleigh 

fChristal Ladeanne Kelly Asheville 

Scott Douglas Kimble Marietta, OH 

***Kimberley Laine King Raleigh 

t***Shari Elizabeth Kirk Cary 

Julie Lynn Knell Gastonia 

Thomas Noss Kyle, Jr Rockville, MD 

Tamara Lynette Lail Granite Falls 

Kay Lynn Lane Tavares, FL 

fRoxanne Marie Langdon Garner 

Paul Lyndon Lanier Jacksonville 

tWilliam Vandeventer Learning, Jr Durham 

tDon Blakley Leonhardt II Vale 

Laura Jill Lewis Eagle Springs 

*Pamela Roxanne Lewis Fallston 

tDavid Edwin Lineback Winston-Salem 

Ingrid Elizabeth Lium Atlanta, GA 

Ella Mae Logan Lake Lure 

tDavid Bryant Lucas Lucama 

{Alexander Cox Mackenzie Matthews 

Robert Keith Manning Greensboro 

t**Victoria Lee Marden Spartansburg 

tChristopher Grey Martin Burlington 

Myrna Martia McCaskill Gastonia 

jJanice Louise McDonald Erwin 

fJohn Joseph McHugh Raleigh 

tSophia Kathry Mcllwain Red Springs 

Gregory Scott McLean Apex 

David Timothy McQueen Raleigh 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

48 



Michael Lawton McQueen Raleigh 

tMark Charles Meissner Charlotte 

James Davis Metzler Greensboro 

Tracy Lynn Miller Sanford 

t Anthony Scott Monfrado Raleigh 

Paul Merritt Moore, Jr Raleigh 

Leigh Ann Morris Asheville 

tKenneth Rick Morrow Forest City 

Cassandra Dale Mudd Fayetteville 

fGregory Ray Myers Thomasville 

fStacey Jean Najarano Cranston, RI 

fDavid Allen Nettesheim Raleigh 

Kelly Elizabeth Newton Morresville 

Patricia Erin Nolan Annapolis 

Timothy John O'Connor Raleigh 

t*Joseph Yates Parker III Raleigh 

**Patricia Karen Parker Morehead City 

Melissa Ann Patrick Ashland, VA 

tMichael Carlos Peace Henderson 

fKimberly Dawn Pearce Raleigh 

**Moira Skea Pearson Raleigh 

Erik Clay Peterson Cherry Hill, NJ 

Metalone Phongsavath Raleigh 

*fTherence Osatti Pickett Philadelphia, PA 

Stephen McDavid Powell Roanoke, VA 

t Jeffrey Wayne Pratt Eden 

Eileen Ann Reap Charlotte 

tRichard Hunt Reifschneider Raleigh 

Brian Forrest Riggins Charlotte 

Christophe Frank Roach Goldsboro 

Jeri Lynne Roberts Greensboro 

fJoseph Christy Rodri, Jr Wilson 

Carl Linwood Rogers III Cary 

Todd Anthony Rollins King George, VA 

fLeslie Jane Rothenberg Lake Wylie, SC 

fStephen Eric Russell Raleigh 

Elizabeth Stone Rutland Hopkinsville 

Jodi Lynn Schneider Raleigh 

David Anthony Scott Raleigh 

fJohn Russell Shattuck Raleigh 

Melissa Ann Sills Bunnlevel 

t*Bradley Allen Smith Greensboro 

Claudia Lee Smith Raleigh 

Craig J. Smith III Winston-Salem 

Gary Dwayne Smith Reidsville 

John Alan Sneeden Wilmington 

Mark David Sobotkin Hickory 

Jonathan Thomas Speaks Kannapolis 

fJohnnie Craig Speight Rocky Mount 

fAngela Jo Stainback Wilson 

Shannon Rae Stamey Forest City 

Edward James Stanley Greenville 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

49 



tNatalie LaTrecia Stewart Raleigh 

Kelly Anne Stryker Lincoln, NE 

tEric Kin-Son Tang Petaling, Jaya 

tSusan Dabney Templeton Lynchburg, VA 

Michael Latif Thomas State College, PA 

fStephon Terrell Thompson Spring Lake 

Janet Blaire Tidwell Cary 

fDale Edwin Tiffany Raleigh 

tRobert Justin Timbers, Jr Spring Lake 

*Donna Lynn Torrence Lenoir 

Annemarie Treadway Greensboro 

Bondilyn Van Etten Hickory 

tAnn Marie Wagner High Point 

tMark Daniel Walker Roxboro 

fThomas Henry Weir III Winston-Salem 

Carrie Elizabeth Wenner Greensboro 

tJeffrey Thomas Williams Raleigh 

t**Stuart Allan Williams Raleigh 

tRobert Wesley Willingham Chapel Hill 

Regina Rhae Wilson Winston-Salem 

tTanya Ann Womble Clinton 

Timothy Earle Woodberry Virginia Beach, VA 

David Ray Worsley, Jr Wallace 

tSherry Kay Wright Gaston 

Margaret Marie Zangerle Jacksonville, FL 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 
Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

John Christopher Allen Jamestown 

tKeary Cavin IV Cary 

tWendell Ray Hodge Yadkinville 

tRobert Jon Hopfenberg Raleigh 

ITodd Kendrick Minchew Wallace 

Kristi Michelle Murray Winston-Salem 

tHilda Marie Robinson Raleigh 

Susan Elizabeth Walker Cary 

tJeri Lynn Walter Greenville 

tScott Eric Weiser Mooresville 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

tAnthony Mark Allen Wake Forest 

tSheryl Yvette Briscoe Charlotte 

tNicole Marlisa Chatman Orange, NJ 

tKathryn Lynn Felton Rocky Mount 

tRobert Benton Brightwell Glasgow IV Raleigh 

tMary Lloyd Hodges Henderson 

tAldwyn Christopher Isley Louisburg 

tJackson Marie Jordan Rocky Mount 

tRobert Joseph Kearney Raleigh 

tMark Jon Marrocco McClean, VA 

tTerri Lynn Pruitt Wilson 

tSandra Kay Reid Winston-Salem 

tSusan Elizabeth Roeber Boca Raton, FL. 

fWilliam Kevin Swartz Sanford 

tKevin Michael Wade Raleigh 

tJohn Charles Welch Pfafftown 

t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude '"SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

50 



Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

tCarleton Scott Andrew Asheville 

tJohn Casey Andrews Rockville, MD 

tEric Scott Blumenthal Chatham, NJ 

t***Ralph Timothy Bryan Roanoke, VA 

t*Dawn Marie Burnett Rockville, MD 

tKimberly Lynn Cagle Claremont 

fjacqwendlyn Marlene Coleman Fayetteville 

Simon Keith Cooper Cheltenham, England 

fNorman Edward Corkhill Manassas, VA 

fWilliam Thomas Daughtrey III Medford, NJ 

fEric Todd Denham Salisbury 

tTamara Leigh Dooley Carolina Beach 

fAnthony Lee Downs Thomasville 

Michael Gregory Dunn Raleigh 

fChibuzor Emmanuel Ehilegbu Aba, Nigeria 

tKimberly Ann Evans Charlotte 

tBrandon Keith Gerringer Raleigh 

tAnthony Joseph Giuli Raleigh 

tCheryl Denise Goodman Wilson 

tKimberly Ann Heisey Charlotte 

tMichael John Hickey Richardson, TX 

tJohnnie Dewey Hodges III Topsail Beach 

tFloyd Lofton Howell, Jr Raleigh 

tTimothy Lee Joines Clemmons 

tRobert Joseph Kearney Raleigh 

t*Walter Richard Kelly III Charlotte 

tPamela Letitia Lindsey Lumberton 

Thomas Dean McGhee Yadkinville 

Scott Thomas McGuinn Greensboro 

David Anthony Parker, Jr Denton 

tMary Hope Poole Raleigh 

tNahida Lea Price Raleigh 

tRitchie Wynne Ray Albuquerque, NM 

Mark Allen Reid Raleigh 

tDavid Craig Salmon Raleigh 

Scott Matthew Teel Raleigh 

*Rebecca Rose Thompson Fayetteville 

tVonda Kaye Villines Hurdle Mills 

t*Brooks Lee Warren Spruce Pine 

tSteven Kent Whitfield Cary 

tMichael Kirk Wilson Raleigh 

Scott Jeffrey Wilson Northampton, MA 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

t**Sharon Sullivan Aspden Raleigh 

tJames Alexander Barnwell III Burlington 

tFrances Denise Bass Roseboro 

tCarolyn Carmontry Bates Fort Bragg 

tAshlea Ennis Benner Fayetteville 

tRichard David Benson Leland 

t**Brian Phillip Brauns Pleasant Garden 

tBrian Karl Brenner Chapel Hill 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

51 



tGary Neville Buchanan Franklin 

Rebecca Lynn Buchanan Sanford 

tCynthia Marie Burns Fayetteville 

tAndrew Malcolm Cooper High Point 

f Roswitha Garcia Damm Raleigh 

■JThomas Hilton Deadmore Richmond, VA 

fLouis Scott Dettman Rocky Mount 

tRobert Franklin Dixon Matthews 

fPamela Tuck Dunn Timberlake 

fDavid Victor Dupont Raleigh 

fKyle Andrew Edwards Iron Station 

■JThomas Fain Eller, Jr Asheville 

tMargaret Dare Fogleman Burlington 

fKaren Luanne Fowler Winston-Salem 

fPatricia Tran Garrett Fayetteville 

tRobert Earl Garris, Jr Roanoke Rapids 

Sarah Lesley Gee Charlotte 

fMyron Shawn Godette New Bern 

t*Karen Rene Gray Knightdale 

Andrew Peter Greene High Point 

fMary Elizabeth Hayes Charleston, SC 

f Charles Heath Helms Peachland 

fChristopher Aaron Hill Cary 

fLisa Ann Hodnett Raleigh 

f*Cathy Annette Hurlocker Raleigh 

f***Sheri Lorraine Jackson Henderson 

f Daniel Joseph Jacobs Raleigh 

fDonna Caroline Jobe Matthews 

fGeorge Jones Kenly 

f Mack Davis Jones Greensboro 

fMarwan Salah Juma Rome, Italy 

fChristal Ladeanne Kelly Asheville 

t***Shari Elizabeth Kirk Cary 

fRoxanne Marie Langdon Gardner 

Carl Eric Lasley Greensboro 

fWilliam Vandeventer Learning, Jr Durham 

fDavid Edwin Lineback Winston-Salem 

***Catherine Helen Lloyd Cary 

fAlexander Cox Mackenzie Matthews 

t**Victoria Lee Marden Spartanburg, SC 

fChristopher Grey Martin Fayetteville 

Harry Shaw McDonald, Jr Raleigh 

f Janice Louise McDonald Erwin 

fSophia Kathry Mcllwan Red Springs 

fMark Charles Meissner Charlotte 

fAnthony Scott Monfrado Raleigh 

fKenneth Rick Morrow Forest City 

Wade Lee Murdock Cary 

fStacey Jean Najarano Cranston, RI 

fDavid Allen Nettesheim Raleigh 

fMichael Carlos Peace Henderson 

fKimberly Dawn Pearce Raleigh 

f*Therence Osatti Pickett Philadelphia, PA 

f Jeffrey Wayne Pratt Eden 

fJoseph Christy Rodri, Jr Wilson 

fLeslie Jane Rothenberg Lake Wylie, SC 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

52 



fStephen Eric Russell Raleigh 

fJohn Russell Shattuck Raleigh 

t*Bradley Allen Smith Greensboro 

fJohnnie Craig Speight Rocky Mount 

tAngela Jo Stainback Wilson 

tNatalie LaTrecia Stewart Raleigh 

tEric Kin-Song Tang Petaling, Jaya 

fSusan Dabney Templeton Lynchburg, VA 

tRobert Justin Timbers, Jr Spring Lake 

fAnn Marie Wagner High Point 

tMark Daniel Walker Roxboro 

fJeffery Thomas Williams Raleigh 

t**Stuart Allan Williams Raleigh 

tRobert Wesley Willingham Chapel Hill 

tTanya Ann Womble Clinton 

Troy Donnell Wright Edenton 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ECONOMICS 
Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Kemp Jerome Chalmers Cameron 

Kevin Patrick Muldowney Gastonia 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

fBarry Keith Bowden Henderson 

Wilson Henry Brown Cary 

Jay Michael Cowder Raleigh 

Randall Edmon King Rural Hall 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Warren Benjamin Chapman Charlotte 

Stephen Gregory Howard Hope Mills 

Neill McCauley Laney, Jr Wilmington 

Angela Michele Long Mebane 

Fredric Todd Macholz Charlotte 

*Claven Curtis Williams, Jr Faison 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Timothy Marvin Bivens Forest City 

Aaron Edward Bryant Winston-Salem 

Norwood Bennett Chestnutt Gastonia 

Garry Pike Copeland Tyner 

Anthea Palliet Jones Lexington 

Joo Hwan Kim Fayetteville 

James Vanty Lamb II Lumberton 

Lynne Suzanne Moose Maiden 

James Michael Pardue Sanford 

HtJohn Lawrence Sorrels Raleigh 

t***Sheila Jane Stone Cary 

Ricardo Velasquez Goldsboro 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

53 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 
Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Carol Christian Brewer Raleigh 

***Patricia Riddle Johnson Raleigh 

***Kenneth Richard Rose North Reading, MA 

Teresa Gayle Royal Millers Creek 

Kimberly Michelle Sivills Rocky Mount 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Pauline Finney Shelby 

Marguerite Tucker Joyner Raleigh 

Robert Brooks Lester Chapel Hill 

Jeany Lynn Sapp Tobaccoville 

James Coburn Shell, Jr Kinston 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Tracey Leigh Baines Raleigh 

Samuel David Carson, Jr Kenbridge, VA 

Michael Standfield Cheek Chapel Hill 

Susan Kay Coble Raleigh 

Amy Elese Elliott Lewisville 

Robin Stephanie Falls Raleigh 

Carver Sapp Faucette Raleigh 

Ellen Adair Griffin Clinton 

Billie Ann Hinton Clayton 

Stephen Milton Holloman Greenville 

Peter Morgan Holman Raleigh 

Deron Leslie Johnson Durham 

Joan Taylor Loftin Vanceboro 

Carol Ann Madre Hertford 

Linda Elizabeth Mahnen Scarsdale, NY 

Allison Cannon McArthur Fayetteville 

Grover John McKay, Jr Knightdale 

tMacon Warfield Michaux, Jr Goldsboro 

Denise Manning Monck Raleigh 

Patricia Rose O'Grady Wheaton, IL 

Eric David Olson Eden 

Timothy Michael Peeler Vale 

William Netherton Wiechmann Guilford, CT 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

***Amy Elizabeth Adams Wilson 

Lynne Denise Basden Rutherfordton 

**Vicki Ricks Bishop Cary 

Anna Lucille Carson Rutherfordton 

**Terri Marie Clerico Flemington, NJ 

Catherine Ludwig Donleycott Raleigh 

Donna Jeanne Edwards Raleigh 

Jill Ann Fortner Goldsboro 

***Wanda Bullock Gilchrist Raleigh 

Margaret Anne Hale Raleigh 

Stephanie Renee Harris Sanford 



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***Betty June Havens Louisburg 

Sheree Long Hester Raleigh 

Daphne Holden Raleigh 

Archibald Robinson Hoxton IV Shepherdstown, WV 

Erica Lynn Hughes Lancaster, PA 

Lisa Kay Hunt Durham 

John Bruce Jones Raleigh 

Marcy Lyn Kuhns Pfafftown 

Patrick Charles Lee Camden, SC 

Crystal Leigh Leonard Thomasville 

Kari Susan Mathisen Sparta, NJ 

Lois Ann McDaniel Cherryville 

Julia Esperanza Morin McKnight Detroit, MI 

*John Howard McWilliam Raleigh 

Rachel Lynae Meldrom Roanoke Rapids 

Penny Pendergraft Miller Marion 

Ellen Christina Neville Linden 

**Lauren Elizabeth Nuckolls Cary 

*Mary Joan Opyr Raleigh 

Robert Kevin Padovano Short Hills, NJ 

Leslie Ann Painter Gastonia 

Valerie Anita Pearson Henderson 

Frederick Daniel Perry Raleigh 

H Melinda Ann Pfeiffer Columbia, SC 

Jennifer Martin Raisig Durham 

Robert Duane Richards Raleigh 

Lisa Marie Strong Carolina Beach 

Gina Marguerite Thompson Wilmington 

**Crystal Dawn Walser Lexington 

Daniel Adam Williams Goldsboro 

Pamela Rae Williams Wilmington 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGLISH 
Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Stephen Jeffrey Brandon High Point 

Paul Joseph McKenzie Bethania 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

*Kimberly Bryant Bruff Raleigh 

t***Catherine Helen Lloyd Cary 

**Sara Frances McClure Rutherfordton 

fClaudia Renate Mitchell Arlington, VA 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

*Lisa Gayle Vogel Fort Lauderdale, FL 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 
Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

*Robert Daniel Murray Winston-Salem 

Daryl Freeman Russell Suffolk, VA 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

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Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Dace Allen Bergen Durham 

**Mark Daniel Chapman Junction City, OR 

William Todd Dunnagan Charlotte 

Jeffrey Wilson Ferrell Knightdale 

Michael Thomas Gaddy Fayetteville 

Robert Arthur Goyette Charlotte 

James Evan Horton Whitakers 

Delmous Roy Ingram, Jr Raleigh 

Pamela Faye Jackson Raleigh 

Lisa Lynn Levine Black Mountain 

*Jane Cole O'Brien Raleigh 

Samuel Omayenwa Okpodu Warri, Nigeria 

Richard Shirley Proctor III Goldsboro 

David Melvin Williams, Jr Denver, CO 

James Ronald Wilson Raleigh 

Anthony Derek Zehia Cary 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Christine Marie Carroll Danbury, CT 

Gregory Brent Chappell Rockingham 

Jeffrey Thomas Coppley Lexington 

Stephanie Laine Denmark LaGrange 

Timothy Myles Dolan Charlotte 

Allison Eva Donnan Oakland, NJ 

Francesca Renee Dorsch Winston-Salem 

John Harrison Harvel Southern Pines 

Virginia Elizabeth Jonson Cary 

Nathan Bryant Karnes Storrs, CT 

Stephanie Paige Maready Wilmington 

William Ernest Maxwell Pink Hill 

*John Mark Sweat Apex 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HISTORY 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Leonard Paul Harrison Goldsboro 

Jennifer Karches Cary 

Susan Hope Lee Asheboro 

Neil William Morgan Vass 

Mark Haviland Tandy Holden Beach 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

*Daniel DeLos Miles Wake Forest 

John Russell Taylor Rocky Mount 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MULTI-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES 
Degree Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Carol Ann Meister Basking Ridge, NJ 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Jeffrey Scott Austin Kernersville 

Suzette Gail Bradham Wagram 



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56 



**Danny Lee Gray, Jr Concord 

William Joseph Ladd Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Emily Lois Carnes Chapel Hill 

tLisa Dawn Harrison Raleigh 

tJanet Dean Hoskins Everetts 

fJennifer Jeanne Love Greensboro 

Maureen Ann Murray Merrimack, NH 

Stephanie Denise Paradeses Raleigh 

Joseph Dante Saccio Charlotte 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

*t April Beverly Adams Robbinsville 

tDavid Michael Barnett Raleigh 

Ronald Kurt Edmark Hibbing, MN 

Cheryl Ann Gancos Thomaston, CT 

t*Laura Jean Gray Raleigh 

Nora Jane Grimbergen Flanders, NJ 

fKimberly Anne Hancock Raleigh 

Steven Charles Josephson Cary 

tElizabeth Lindsay McCoy Fayetteville 

**Julia Richardson Mclver Fuquay Varina 

fAmy Kathryn Pettyjohn Winston-Salem 

tDeborah Kathleen Reedy Clinton 

fRuthan Mary Singleton Charlotte 

t*Dana Ann Watson Gastonia 

fDonna Kay Weavil Whiteville 

Wallace Benjamin Wolverton Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHILOSOPHY 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Ht***Andrea Michelle Herr Lancaster, PA 

Arun Kumar Prasad Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

**Daniel John O'Herrick Raleigh 

*Mark David Prather II Wilmington 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

James Michael Cofer Charlotte 

Diane Edwards Nashville 

**Michael Ernest Hayhurst Medina, OH 

Michael Lamonte Hunter Goldsboro 

Malissia Agnes Moore Red Oak 

Kenneth Isaac Poe Durham 

Dawn Anne Weaver Plantation, FL 

Adrian ZaCharuss Williams Fayetteville 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Donald James Faggart, Jr Concord 

Lena Claudine Ford Charlotte 

John Raydean Kivett, Jr Asheboro 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

57 



Michael Addison Knight Raleigh 

Joseph George Marshall Winston-Salem 

Isaac Gregory Medlin Raleigh 

Sandra Alice Ray Warsaw 

William Edward Tourtellot Charlotte 

Henry John Waters, Jr Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Jeffery Lewis Barger Hickory 

John Richard Best Goldsboro 

John Kenneth Carlisle, Jr Cary 

Anthony Scott Chesnutt Salemburg 

Robert Ansel Clark Marion 

Howard Lee Clyburn Raleigh 

William Fleming Courts Greensboro 

Virginia Coleman Creech Wilson 

Scott Howell Dannenberg Raleigh 

David Terrell Dellinger Durham 

Alan Wade Eatmon Rocky Mount 

William Kinglsey Goldfarb Charlotte 

John Frederick Doyle Hartwell Closter, NJ 

Scott Edward Hildebran Hickory 

**Marjorie Wetherbee Hodges Linville 

Robin Lynn Holt Sanford 

Jeffrey Glenn Horton Roxboro 

*Kimberly Dawn Krawiec Kernersville 

Tallemeko Lewis Goldsboro 

Kelly Susan Mclnnis Fayetteville 

*Barbara Piver Moore Garner 

Kirkland Haughton Rice Greensboro 

Cynthia Louise Royals Kernersville 

Ricky Lee Sapp Winston-Salem 

•[Jonathan Andrew Shelton Winston-Salem 

Steven Allen Sloan Sanford 

Timothy Steven Smith Kinston 

Marcanthony Sodano Warrington, PA 

Scott Vincent Stuart Charlotte 

Michael Lauritz Sweeney Durham 

David Dirk Tharpe Statesville 

Jan Renea 1 Tharrington Garner 

Mary Dell Weeks Winston-Salem 

James Barrett Wilson Winston-Salem 

Degrees Conferred May 7,1988 

Rodney Lance Baker Cary 

Abigail Denise Ballard Raleigh 

Lisa Stone Barnes Middlesex 

Jeffrey Charles Barnhardt Mocksville 

Justine Andrea Carpenter Gastonia 

Jeffrey Glenn Causey Cary 

Robert Booker Coats II Raleigh 

Phillip Cohn Craig Durham 

Kassie Herb Creekmore Raleigh 

Sherman Lee Criner Raleigh 

*Ann Elizabeth Dixon Cary 

H***William Murray Downs Raleigh 

Mekella Sedonia Dunlap Coinjock 

t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

58 



Kimberly Kay Engle Banner Elk 

William Clayton Faulk Fayetteville 

Anthony Michael Fields Goldston 

Suzanne Annette Marie Gallant Raleigh 

Janet Renee Grisdale Charlotte 

Steven Frank Hamlin Cherry Hill, NJ 

Eric Gregory Hansen Fayetteville 

David Clay Houston Grifton 

Jeffrey William Huber Fuquay Varina 

tRichard Dalton Huber II Canton 

Mitchell Wright Kernstine Warsaw 

*Lorna Marie Massey Raleigh 

**Michael Joseph McCann Raleigh 

Samuel Norman McKenzie, Jr Wrightsville Beach 

Indira Savannah Moses Williamston 

Stacy Lynn Myrick Greensboro 

Joseph Thomas Neville Dunn 

John Marshall Nunnally Raleigh 

Michael Irvin Outlaw Kenansville 

Richard Howard Pajerski Raleigh 

Elizabeth Anne Pfuetze Athens, OH 

*Frederic William Powers Mukwonago, WI 

Davina Pujari Bluefield, WV 

Charles Exum Rambeau, Jr Fuquay-Varina 

Hector Neill Ray Fayetteville 

Jean Carol Smith Winston-Salem 

Pamela Suzanne Utter Greensboro 

**Kristy Weathers Southern Pines 

Charles Horace Weaver Raleigh 

Leonard Lamont Wiggins Rocky Mount 

Steven Cameron Wright Charlotte 

Lorie Michelle Yoos Wilson 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Frank Gereon Mittag Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

William Jonathan Compton Raleigh 

William Carroll Elliott West Jefferson 

Keith Alexander Hawkins Durham 

*Stewart Todd Morgan Boone 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Robert Thomas Johnson Mount Olive 

Ann Marie O'Donohue Durham 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

59 



Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Charles Harris Bates Greensboro 

Jill Louise Kabala Raleigh 

Gina Marie Pratola Verona, NJ 

*Clint Ryan Tillerson Apex 

Sherie Ann Yorkovich Charlotte 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Wade Lloyd Britt Cary 

Michael Craig Brittain Hendersonville 

Dora Lee Dunston Raleigh 

Wanda Yvette Floyd Henderson 

Carla Thomasine Hillman Cheaspeake, VA 

Paul Albert Koop Raleigh 

David Benjamin Stone Sanford 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Sandra Lee Bannerman Springfield, VA 

Deborah Leigh Brittsan Greensboro 

Karen Leigh Cartner Clemmons 

Richard Bryant Culler Kernersville 

Brian Scott Davis High Point 

Vonnie Lucile Dawson Stantonsburg 

Eugene Owen Gallagher, Jr Raleigh 

Lisa Carol Harmon Raleigh 

Mary Susan Indelicato Alexandria, VA 

♦Virginia Wilson Jeffers Raleigh 

***Carol Rose Jernigan Dunn 

Mary Katherine Keating Kinston 

**Jeffrey Lance Lasater Knightdale 

Lorenzo Steven Melton Raleigh 

Joseph Lawrence Page Wilson 

Anna Corinne Peel Durham 

Meigan Marie Sullivan Potomac, MD 

William Edward Tillman Butner 

Linda Brown Wheeler Durham 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPANISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

fAshley Annette Collins Warsaw 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Charles Reagan Purser Brevard 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Martha Joe Buffaloe Garner 

Tim McCoy Duke, Jr Louisburg 

fRichard Dalton Huber II Canton 

**Patricia Diane Metzler North Jackson, OH 

Martha Ann Tucker Rockville, MD 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

60 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Thellena Pearl Brown Jamaica, NY 

Susan Elizabeth Crouch Rocky Mount 

Roberta Kay Harger Fayetteville 

Belinda Marie Haselrig Greenville 

Suzanne Ware Scott Raleigh 

Patrena Yvette Trice Chesapeake, VA 

Ann Kathleen Vrba Convent Station, NJ 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

*John McNair Bell Raleigh 

Donna Elizabeth Biglin Stewart Manor, NY 

Patricia Lee Brown Chapel Hill 

Carolyn Jane Teeter Chappell Raleigh 

Kathy Ann Frye Kannapolis 

Joe Ellison Mcintosh, Jr Lexington 

Melinda Jean Morris Hendersonville 

Lisa Anne Natoli Chevy Chase, MD 

Robyn Lin Richardson Raleigh 

Elizabeth Michaele Riley Parkersburg, WV 

Stuart Scott Sanderson Wendell 

Angela Renee Shackelford Dillon 

Deborah Ann Sheppard Monroe 

Marva Denise Williams Baltimore, MD 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Jeffrey Michael Aiken Durham 

Nancy Margaret Bailey Raleigh 

Lynn East Barber Turonza, AR 

David Lawrence Barron Raleigh 

Julia Meredith Brady Reidsville 

David Addison Brooks Fayetteville 

Anita Dawn Campbell Randleman 

Susan Elizabeth Campbell King of Prussia, PA 

Karen Ruth Clark Garner 

Ashley Brailsford Crawford Lexington 

Peri Hope Dunefsky Huntington, NY 

Alan Jeffrey Furno Cary 

Suzanne Grandbois Montreal, Canada 

Abbie Leigh Gray High Point 

Todd Lee Green Kannapolis 

*Bruce Bailey Ham Fayetteville 

fLisa Dawn Harrison Raleigh 

Linda Marie Hazeltine Matthews 

Kenneth Hooper Helms Cherryville 

tJanet Dean Hoskins Everetts 

Thomas McNeal James Leland 

David Harrison Kellis Candor 

Elizabeth Ann Kemper Ballston Spa, NY 

**Samuel Timothy Kent Marion 

Jacqueline Kibler Cary 

Darren John Ley Sanford 

Michael Levon Long Greenville 

tJennifer Jeanne Love Greensboro 



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61 



Jill Katherine Lundgren Charlotte 

**Angela Marie Mason Washington 

Richard Anderson Meadows Sanford 

Paul Herbert Noblin, Jr Raleigh 

Mary Annette Petty Charlotte 

Jamie Rae Schofield Titusville, FL 

Paige Elizabeth Siner Morehead City 

t***Stacey Lynn Smith Cary 

Allen Lawrence Sofley Cary 

Nicolette Marie Sorger Havertown, PA 

Raymond Gerald Spencer, Jr Southport 

Anne Marie Storey Vincentown, NJ 

Kenneth Todd Williamson Wilson 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

t*April Beverly Adams Robbinsville 

Marlon Walton Archey Los Angles, CA 

fDavid Michael Barnett Raleigh 

Mary Elizabeth Baroody Winston-Salem 

*Rima Veronika Barzdukas Falls Church, V A 

Jewell Henriette Ball Fayetteville 

Amy Lynn Boiselle Fayetteville 

*Dianne Creech Kenly 

Cynthia Lucille Davis Rowland 

Kevin Dunston Newark, NJ 

Cherry Lynn Escherich Burlington 

Stacy Lariannette Evans Oxford 

Jackie Dean Farmer II Apex 

Sonja Joyce Gill Silver Spring, MD 

Danielle Monee Glenn Winston-Salem 

t*Laura Jean Gray Raleigh 

Mary Kathryn Gregg Saint Davids, PA 

Anne Lawrence Griffin Charlotte 

Timothy Oliver Haas Boone 

John Denning Hall Clinton 

tKimberly Anne Hancock Raleigh 

Ronald Guyle Hesmer Wilson 

Valerie Lynn Hocutt Manteo 

•Jill Marie Holmes Stockton, CA 

John Stuart Inman Elizabethtown 

David Sean Johnston Coral Gables, FL 

Robin Michelle Jones Winston-Salem 

Matthew Adams Kelley Raleigh 

Christie Lynne Knittel Fairvield, CT 

Stephanie Dawn Lamb Hendersonville 

Daniel Robert Lee Garner 

***Julia Williams Lee Raleigh 

fElizabeth Lindsay McCoy Fayetteville 

Molly Ann Miller High Point 

Stephen Christopher Morrison Marion, SC 

Lori Wade Nance Raleigh 

Hugh Reavis Nelson III Durham 



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62 



Christopher Harvey Nichols Winston-Salem 

Stephen Edward Nixon, Jr High Point 

Sharon Page O'Dell Raleigh 

Scharina Farranzel Oliver Winston-Salem 

Elizabeth Darlene Owen Oak Ridge 

William Scott Parton Rutherfordton 

Wendy Lea Patterson Kenbridge, VA 

Seth Jones Perkinson III Charlotte 

fAmy Kathryn Pettyjohn Winston-Salem 

**Amy Lee Pfeiffer Columbia, SC 

Phillip Marvin Pitchford Fayetteville 

David James Purvis Winston-Salem 

Jutta LaTeppar Reed Columbia 

Deborah Kathleen Reedy Clinton 

Thomas Coleman Richardson III Henderson 

Susan Freeman Riddle Sanford 

Deward Reginald Robinson, Jr Mount Holly 

Divakar Kirit Shukla Charlotte 

Philip Silverstein Simsbury, CT 

fRuthan Mary Singleton Charlotte 

Amy Christine Smith Charlotte 

Dawn Lee Snavely Alexandria, VA 

Angela McQueen Thompson Lumberton 

Cassandra Lee Tomes Rockville, MD 

Susan Elisabeth Tutza Point Pleasant, NJ 

Monique Velasquez Amarillo, TX 

t*Dana Ann Watson Gastonia 

t Donna Kay Weavil Whiteville 

Sharon Helene Wilensky Raleigh 

Jane Michele Wilkins Hampton, VA 

Timothy Ross Wilkins Garner 

Mary Beth Williams Autryville 

Jane Hunter Wilson Salisbury 

Jeffrey Todd Wimberley Durham 

James Philip Wylie Charlotte 

BACHELOR OF SOCIAL WORK 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

**Jacqueline Stevens Conord Peterborough, NH 

William Albert Leverenz, Jr Kingston, NY 

Meannette Lewis Newton Grove 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

*Susan Roswell Godfrey Columbia, SC 

Kristy Leigh Jennette Goldsboro 

*Beverly Inez Pike Raleigh 

**Tammy Van Buren Stamper Winston-Salem 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Sheila Clayton Crews Greensboro 

Molly Caroline Michael Lexington 

Craig William Smith Marshville 

Terry Leonard Thomas Wilmington, DE 

Sherry Denise Windham Raleigh 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

63 



College of Physical and 
Mathematical Sciences 




BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CHEMISTRY 
Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Frank Scott Arnold Charlotte 

James Darren Martin Mount Airy 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

fBarry Keith Bowden Henderson 

Allen Bobby Ingle Marshall 

Ann Hyunwon Kim Elizabeth City 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

fSurojini Meera Bhikhai Cary 

fNorwood Bennett Chesnutt Gastonia 

fSarah Elisabeth Glover Asheboro 

fDean Edward Gokel Raleigh 

Glenn Athur Graham Henderson 

t**Lisa Lynne Haney Indialantic, FL 

Doris Kim Johnson Burlington 

Bradley Lee Wilson 

Barbara Christine Marrujo Winston-Salem 

Clarence Arthur Rupard Mocksville 

tNancy Graham Waff Statesville 

t*Lisa Eugenia Williams Wilmington 

Billie Leigh Woosley Granite Falls 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

**Kimberly Griffith Atkins Pilot Mountain 

David Goad Brintle Mount Airy 

Donald Bigham Cochran Stamford, CT 

John Steven Crook Monroe 

Angela LeAnn Diggs China Grove 

William Bradley Griffin Zebulon 

t***Shelia Crocker Hopkins Selma 

Thomas Bernard Kenney Raleigh 

tAlex Ray Kirby Durham 

Lisa Richey Padgett Charlotte 

tDerek James Parks Goldsboro 

Carolyn Patricia Pearsall Greenville 

fRobert Brian Raybon Wendell 

*Susan Marie Rhodes Hendersonville 

Dennis Eugene Ross Carthage 

Frenchie Janlean Simpson Winston-Salem 

*Garry Michael Summer Cherryville 

t***Johnny Clayton Weeks III Burlington 

Jamie Kaye Whitfield Durham 



t Co-major "Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

64 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Kimberly Barbour Perry Clayton 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Curtis Kent Barnhardt Winston-Salem 

Christopher Thomas Kochanowicz Lexington 

Laura Anne Torres Statesville 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

George McKinley Adams, Jr Zebulon 

**Rima Salin Al-Awar Raleigh 

John Edmond Baur Wayne, PA 

*Edward Paul Bowman Hendersonville 

Carolyn Ann Bruce Wilmington 

fSteven Mark Clements Raleigh 

Paru Kishore Desai Collegeville, PA 

**William Paul Hudson, Jr Burlington 

***Paula Blackman Huffman Goldsboro 

Kenneth Alan Krebs Winston-Salem 

Cathleen Dawn Roberts Greensboro 

Edith Marie Simpson Winston-Salem 

fMaureen Kaye Spears Matthews City, VA 

t**Timothy George Strein Montoursville, PA 

t**Eric Leonard Tart Browns Summit 

Karen Christine Traylor Fayetteville 

tJill Carroll Watson Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

*Marck Chadwick Barker Cary 

**Margaret Anne Hinson Nashville 

**Eileen Elizabeth Kupstas Kinston 

Tammy Virginia Martin Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Isaac Reginald Allen Wade 

Harry Asmura Barber Raleigh 

*William Robert Bireley Vero Beach, FL 

Tamela Luann Boger Clemmons 

Cynthia Watson Bowman Winston-Salem 

*Stephanie Mullen Davis Rolesville 

John Stephen Dorsett Raleigh 

Dennis Wade Elledge Millens Creek 

Mark Harold Fletcher Nashville, TN 

Richard Earl Harrison Troutman 

Daniel Vincent Lucas Cary 

**Myrene Elizabeth Martin Lawsonville 

Brian Keith McCuiston Winston-Salem 

Christopher Roscoe Obie Roxboro 

Himesh Gajendra Patel Raleigh 

Alok Sharma Ajmer, India 

**John William Snyder Cary 

Julianne Elizabeth Staub Southern Pines 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

65 



**Anna Beth Taylor Harrellsville 

Harriet Jones Watts Raleigh 

Alissa Renee Wilhelm Morrisville 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Walter Enos Allen Reidsville 

Robert Emerson Allison, Jr Cleveland 

**Jenny Crenshaw Beal Jacksonville, FL 

Rodney Blake Blackwell Reidsville 

Kimberly Dawn Boone Rocky Mount 

Robert Elwood Brady, Jr Statesville 

Scott Anderson Cheek Pineville 

Elizabeth Ann Chermak Raleigh 

David John Christofaro Raleigh 

David Wade Cloninger Dallas 

Carrie Wren Combs Rural Hall 

Walker Ragland Crump III Raleigh 

***Blain Alan Dillard Charlotte 

*James Patrick Eberwein Durham 

***Arleen Dorothy Ebinger Elon College 

Mark William Enloe Raleigh 

Paula Marie Hemric Ronda 

Annette Home Fayetteville 

Tina Lynn Hudnell Melbourne, FL 

**Angie Eve Jacobs Jelenia Gora, Poland 

♦James Christoph Jones Advance 

Katherine Altavia Justice Greenville 

Bradley William Klenz Charlotte 

*Anne Marie Lach Raleigh 

***Menahem Levanon Bat Yam, Israel 

*Martin Leon Loy, Jr Burlington 

Paul Cooper Lunceford Silver Springs, MD 

Gregory Scott Luther Rocky Mount 

William David Marseilles Pinehurst 

**Kevin John McCloskey Jacksonville 

Milton Edison McCoy, Jr New Bern 

Darryl Dana McGraw Whiteville 

Vicki Leigh Merricks Charlotte 

James Jefferson Millard High Point 

Carlotta Gretchen Miller Winston-Salem 

Larry Douglas Miller, Jr Salisbury 

***Gabriel Gaby Mizrahie Ramat-Gan, Israel 

Jeffrey Mukamal Whiteville 

Roy Clyde Owens Mebane 

Snehal Harivadan Parikh Bombay, India 

Mark Curtis Park Elkin 

Pranav Kanti Patel Vasad, India 

Dat Tien Pham Greensboro 

Richard Alan Ragland Raleigh 

**Mickey Donald Sartin Roxboro 

Ernest Perry Sharpe III Chapel Hill 

Thomas Edward Sherron Sanford 

**Marianne VanLeeuwen Sisson Wake Forest 

Cynthia Plain Sliwa Raleigh 

Joseph Matthew Smith Pleasant Garden 

♦Mary Beth Smith Charlotte 



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66 



Travis Casey Stephenson Smithfield 

Mark Benjamin Terry Henderson 

Paul Andrew Thomas Charlotte 

Craig Anthony Tripp Charlotte 

**Paul Duncan Walukewicz Garner 

Michael Stephen Whitcher Troy 

*Ronald Day Young Oxford 

***Van Austin Zimmerman Cary 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Stuart Allen Austin Hickory 

Allen Bernard Bailey Drewery 

*David Jonathan Bailey Raleigh 

***William Spencer Boswell Wilson 

Randall Craig Buckland Raleigh 

**Gary Neal Bundy Kinston 

t**Richard Allen Bynum Goldsboro 

John Michael Carroll Goldsboro 

Stephen Craig Chapman Cary 

Janet Marie Charbonneau Goldsboro 

Tresa Lyn Stone Chastain Whitehall, MI 

Dawn Renae Cherry Wilson 

Siddharth Chopra Greensboro 

*Randy Boyd Cleary Lexington 

**Maya Ruthanne Codelli Atlanta, GA 

Joan Carmel Cooney Cary 

*Andree Charlotte Corbin Wake Forest 

Phillip Walter Crowson Charlotte 

Robert S. Culpepper Nags Head 

John Wentzle DeBoskey Raleigh 

Kimberly Theresa Donleycott Cary 

**Jeffrey Mark Estroff Charlotte 

Ircil Nathaniel Gentry, Jr Raleigh 

*Nancy Elizabeth Gibbs Reidsville 

Donald George Gordon Coral Springs, FL 

Walter William Gould Raleigh 

**Rodney Ray Green Oxford 

Jeffrey Alan Hallman Lincolnton 

Samuel Leonard Hayes Cameron 

fJoseph Tracy Hester Kernersville 

Scott McDowell Hester Charlotte 

Barry Fitzgerald Hicks Burlington 

*Jimmie Banks Hicks, Jr New Bern 

Rebecca Dale Holder Dunn 

William Lyndon Hoopper Franklin 

Katherine Estelle Kalish Charlotte 

*Elizabeth Ann Koonts Charlestown, SC 

Shawn Dickey Lackey Concord 

***Kathleen Davis Lee Raleigh 

Kenneth Gerald Lee Whiteville 

Jeanette Denise Long Yanceyville 

Kerry Antwan Long High Point 

*Karen Lynn Mahoney Wilson 

**Timothy Allen Malone Cary 

Carol Ann Marion Atlanta, GA 

Juan Christopher Mclver Sanford 



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67 



**Stephen Derrick McNeill Asheboro 

*Todd Wilson Medlin Monroe 

***Elizabeth Anne Middleton Raleigh 

***Elizabeth Diane Mynatt Knoxville, TN 

t***William Kenneth Neighbors III Benson 

**Matthew Douglas Palmer Palmer 

Richard Levonte Palmer Stratford, CT 

Tonya Deneen Palmer Fayetteville 

***Lynn Paige Perkinson Roanoke Rapids 

Sarah Lois Peters Roanoke, VA 

***Daniel Scott Petersen Raleigh 

Frank Wiley Pittenger Raleigh 

Robert Allen Powell Lowgap 

**Keith Douglas Raker Winston-Salem 

Walter Samuel Rogers, Jr Roxboro 

***Randolph Rollins Rowell Holly Springs 

Bryan Keith Shuler Fort Worth, Tx 

*Sook-Cheng Sim Malaysia, Penang 

Jeffrey Alan Simpson Reidsville 

Dwayne Allen Sorrell Durham 

♦Brian Scott Stewart Midland, PA 

Bryan Keith Stewart Winston-Salem 

Brian Joseph Summy Raleigh 

Tong Kok Tang Hendersonville 

**Tuyet Dien Tran Greensboro 

Stephen Anthon Vincent Lynchburg, VA 

**Nho Thi Vo Cary 

*Gregory Mark Vulopas Succasunna, NJ 

fDarrel Wade Vuncannon Greensboro 

Milton James Westmoreland, Jr Charlotte 

Lisa Regina Wharton East Bend 

**Thomas Wolf Fayetteville 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOLOGY 
Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Matthew Nicholas Gikas Rochester, MN 

James Cecil Izzell, Jr Greensboro 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Amy Leslie Eason Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY 
Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Craig William Kiley Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

tDean Edward Gokel Raleigh 

Kenneth Chad Leinbach Pfafftown 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

68 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS 
Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Elaine Sue Futris Fayetteville 

**Richard Craig Johnson Raleigh 

Scott Dillon Pleasants Greensboro 

Susan Duff Hosie Smith Apex 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Jocelyn Edwina Bethel Kinston 

Karen Marie De Vol Washington, DC 

Kenneth Allen Howard Raleigh 

***Susan Edith Liles Raleigh 

*Neil Phillip Sigman Newton 

Lorna Clarice Withrow Shelby 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Scott Edward Arnold Jacksonville 

fKaushik Banerjee San Jose, CA 

Larry Dean Bolick Hickory 

Gerald Zachary Bray Elizabeth City 

Christine Marie DeKraker Greensboro 

Curtis Maurice Hamilton Dudley 

Barbara Darlene Hargett Matthews 

Alison Lynne Johnson Boone 

Mathew Cole Martin, Jr Jacksonville 

*Jerri Renee Wells Goldsboro 

Kimberly Anne Whitaker Thiells, NY 

Randolph Stanton Wright Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

*Maria Michelle Andrews Greensboro 

Mark Joseph Bumgardner Durham 

Lekim Banh Chapel Hill 

***Pirkko Palonen Barber Raleigh 

**James William Brantley Selma 

*James Anthony Burgess Brevard 

t***Timothy Michael Del Sole Winston-Salem 

fPamela Dawn Edmondson Tarboro 

***Tonya Lynn Etchison Siler City 

*Robin Mary Finnerty Apex 

Annette Fogg Louisburg 

Wanda Louise Freeman Liberty 

*Karen Leigh Godwin Wilson 

fDavid Wilson Justice Kernersville 

Phillip Lee Lewis Reidsville 

**Robin Rutledge Moore Thomasville 

**Bruce Wayne Perry Statesville 

fTeresa Faye Rogers Mebane 

*David William Sheppard Deer Park, NY 

fDenette Lee Sleeth Novelty, OH 

t***Sheila Jane Stone Cary 

tJohn Russell Taylor Rocky Mount 

Kenneth Allen Wetherington New Bern 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



69 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN METEOROLOGY 
Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

***Steven Rice Chiswell Derwood, MD 

Richard Wilkins Fisher Sun Prairie, WI 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Phillip Wayne Badgett Dobson 

Charles Lowell Begley, Jr Winston-Salem 

Daniel Scott Connell Salisbury, MD 

Stuart Pierce Creighton Dunn 

Michael Robert Dennis Raeford 

*Susan Whitson Hallyburton Marion 

Kathryn Joanne Hoxsie Burbank, CA 

Thomas Clark Moore Belmont 

Elizabeth Tamsin Toler Nashville, IN 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICS 
Degree Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Stephen Max Tussey Asheboro 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

fKaushik Banerjee San Jose, CA 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Carson Lee Bennett II Halifax, VA 

**Stuart Jay Berkowitz Raleigh 

Jeffrey Alexander Cantrell Clayton 

Lowell Grady Dallas Cary 

t***Timothy Michael Del Sole Winston-Salem 

Matthew Jack Freeman Charlotte 

Thomas Harriman Jevon Pittsburgh, PA 

Mark Anderson Miller Spring Hope 

*David Allen Moffett Dallas 

*Denys Laurent Proteau Raleigh 

***Jerry Michael Reid Winston-Salem 

Robert Michael Tidwell Pleasant Garden 

James Edward Vogel, Jr Jacksonville 

***Kimberly Gay Wade Madisonville, KY 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN STATISTICS 
Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Craig Stephen Hansen Akron, OH 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Melissa Ann Conner Chadbourn 

*Kecia Dawn Hancock Seagrove 

***Mary Amelia Woessner Cary 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Vickie Lynn Booth Eden 

t**Richard Allen Bynum Goldsboro 

Virginia Diane James Raleigh 

t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

70 



tDavid Wilson Justice Kernersville 

*Gregory Bryan Russell Summerfield 

Barbara Suzanne Simmons Seven Springs 

*Melodie Annette Waitman Trinity 



College of Textiles 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILE ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the College of Textiles and the College of Engineering. See 
page 19 under College of Engineering for a listing of the graduate seniors in the 
jointly administered department. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 

Degree Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Edwin Russell Smith Jamestown 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Steven Maurice Mosley Raleigh 

Laura Ann Trollinger Burlington 

Frederick Eugene Wilson III High Point 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

*Kenneth Ray Butts Charlotte 

Peter Graham Christian Fayetteville 

Richard Bryan Torrence Salisbury 

David Richard Vlaservich, Jr Gastonia 

Kenneth Wayne Witherell, Jr Conover 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

*Janet Bliss Absher Greensboro 

Curtis Jack Bare, Jr Havelock 

David Carson Benson Greensboro 

t*Deborah Jean Bracht Wilmington 

Donald Andrew Buckner, Jr Gastonia 

Samira Williams Collins Greensboro 



t Co-major 



1 CumLaude 



' Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



71 



"Thomas Worth Coltrane, Jr Asheboro 

William Elvin Hopkins, Jr Bishopville, SC 

Sylvie Christine Hudgins Fayetteville 

Virgil Lynn Lippard Salisbury 

Douglas Vincent Matre Charlotte 

*Frances Darlene McDonald Hamlet 

* Randy Lee Mumford Charlotte 

t*Paige Meredith Newland Wilmington 

Rona Levetta Reid Charlotte 

**Adrian Arthur Roberson Zebulon 

*Carol Lynn Shay Charlotte 

**Elizabeth Lanier Smith Wilmington 

Thomas Jefferson Smith, Jr Lincolnton 

Hf**Timothy George Strein Montoursville, PA 

t**Eric Leonard Tart Browns Summit 

Russell Douglas Walls Goldsboro 

Tammy Lynn Wise Charlotte 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILE AND APPAREL MANAGEMENT 

Degrees Conferred June 2U, 1987 

Terry Wayne Stroud Denver 

Garlon Jerome Stuart, Jr Fuquay-Varina 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Mark Ray Arrowood Lebo 

*David Thomas Ballenger Charlotte 

Charlotte Denise Sutton Warsaw 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

James Alexander Baldecchi Henderson 

Nasir Mohammed Bandukda Karachi, Pakiston 

James Addison Barnhardt Charlotte 

Michael Shannon Beck Thomasville 

Gregory Mitchell Byrd Angier 

Gina Carol Edwards Newton Grove 

Mark Allen Eudy Concord 

Carla Lea Gallimore Ellerbe 

Wanda Gail Harris Goldsboro 

Allyson Anne Johnson Shelby 

Timothy Darrell Koonts Lexington 

Daniel Weston Long Bladenboro 

Michelle Louise Mauney Gastonia 

Radovan Fitzgerald Moss Charlotte 

Suzanne O'Donnell Greensboro 

Timothy Ephraim Pittman Valdese 

James Thomson Potter III Kings Mountain 

Andrew John Southwell Wilkesboro 

Gary Daniel Steppling Pittsburgh, PA 

Larry Randall Stroud Jamestown 

Stafford McKee Swearingen Sedalia, MO 

Lee Krista Timmerman Traverse City, MI 

Karen Lynn Wilhelm Hickory 

Barron Anthony Womble Kings Mountain 

Leslie Gale Woodburn Greensboro 



t Co-major * Cum Laude ** Magna Cum Laude "'SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 
72 



Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Peggy Moore Anderson Henderson 

George Lovick Ballard, Jr Lumberton 

Keith Phillip Brubaker Callaway, VA 

Mark Lynn Brummitt Henderson 

♦Richard Thomas Capel Troy 

Jason Leon Carter Hickory 

*Sara McDuffie Current Gastonia 

Anthony Perry Ervin, Jr Henderson 

Alan Todd Fleming Lexington 

Steven Charles Gamlin Selma 

*Tracy Lynn Haley Kannapolis 

Brian Kevin Hooker Thomasville 

***Martha Craig Lambeth Greensboro 

*Robert Eric Lowder Albemarle 

Perry Michael Luisi Plainview, NY 

David Scott McLaughlin China Grove 

Walter Currin Montgomery Roxboro 

**Michael Scott Phillips High Point 

Steven Mark Pruitt Providence 

Robert Gregory Rabon Lexington 

*Mary Beth Sabio Oakland, NJ 

Martin Karl Schreiner Raleigh 

♦Stephanie Ann Sigmon Newton 

James Howard Styles, Jr Statesville 

*Benjamin Wesley Swain Charlotte 

Catherine Ann Thompson Goldsboro 

Cheryl Ann Yvars Valhalla, NY 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILE SCIENCE 
Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Charles Christian Hertwig III Macon, GA 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

t*Clinton Kesler Atkinson Siler City 

James Marion Edmonds Greensboro 

William Henry Garrett, Jr Edenton 

John Gregory Lemelin Matthews 

James Bruce Malpass, Jr Goldsboro 

Michael Glenn Pilkington Selma 

Jonathan LeAllen Rhoades Raleigh 

Alex Sylvester Whitley Oakboro 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Tonia Jeanine Ashburn Wilson 

Anthony Hunter Durham, Jr Greensboro 

Paul Darin Gilbert Conover 

Hf***Timothy Leon Grady Winston-Salem 

Derek Michael Gunn Madison 

George Loren Hamilton Pikeville 

Van Alex Johnson Stoneville 

Sharon Kay McCraw Hendersonville 

t***Philip Dean Rucker Lincolnton 

Jerry Edsel Sanderson Charlotte 



t Co-major *CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude ***SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 

73 



***Jacqueline Crawford Wentz Arden 

La Shurya Marie Wise Vanceboro 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEXTILES 
Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Sandra Beatriz Cameron Lima, Peru 

Allison Leer Cowles Charlottesville, VA 

Margaret Ellen Cozort Valdese 

David Mitchell Crowder Huntersville 

Derek Todd Hanes Lexington 

Richard Allen Jones Hickory 

Sherry Machell McCourry Conover 

Jamie Lynn Stumpf Bear Creek 

Sabra Simone Sweitzer Raleigh 

H Marjorie Deanne Williams Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Thomas Michael Barbee Huston, TX 

*Florence Chepkoech Morogo Kenya 

Martha Wambui Mwangi Karatima, Kenya 

Luby Clifton Rose Fremont 

Douglas John Salway Raleigh 

Michael Darron Staton Archdale 



Professional Degrees 




CIVIL ENGINEER 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Asaad Ahmed Shamsi Kaychi, Pakistan 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Karl Kar-Yue Lin Hong Kong 



t Co-major 



'CumLaude ** Magna Cum Laude 



'SummaCum Laude H Honors Program 



74 



GRADUATE DEGREES 



Master's Degrees 




MASTER OF AGRICULTURE 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Charlie Wayne Batten Wendell 

Robert Stanley Hayter Southern Pines 

Cedric Kindell Jones Elizabethtown 

James Franklin Miller, Jr Watkinsville, GA 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

David Christian Berle Danbury 

Benedict M. Bhembe Lobamba, Swaziland 

Momodou Balancang Sainy Canteh Sallikenye, Gambia 

James Homer Norris Tabor City 

Lyson Mulongoti Phiri Kitwe, Zambia 

Purna Man Shakya Pokhara, Nepal 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Keith Doyle Clay Murphy 

Timothy Sears Hall Pineville 

Franklin Daniel Shaw Richlands 

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE 
Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Edward Alexander Gerster Raleigh 

Lynn Cesaro Lacy Halifax, VA 

Marianne Cherene Mansour Jefferson Township, NJ 

John Lester Rose Arlington, VA 

Dominic Joseph Sarica North Brunswick, NJ 

Paul Albert Taylor Cohoes, NY 

Jeffrey Lynn Trussler Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Fida Sadak Abdulkhalek Raleigh 

Azza A. Arif Cairo, Egypt 

Aenne Maria Feil Barchowsky Asheville 

Kwan-Young Chung Seoul, Korea 

Samuel R. Cooper Atlanta, GA 

John Kevin Huelster Indianapolis, IN 

Lisa Keskinen Raleigh 

Signe Jeanne LeFever Plainfield, NJ 

Chun Wing Edward Lui Hong Kong 

Steven Andrew Odams Weston, CT 



75 



Ann Ellen Ruthsdottir Battle Creek, MI 

Wendy Suzanne Schmitthenner Barnesville, OH 

William Merritt Singer Durham 

Chalermpol Sriprapattha Bangkok, Thailand 

Dennis Edward Stallings Satellite Beach, FL 

MASTER OF BIOMATHEMATICS 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Yanan Yu Ochen, People's Republic of China 

MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Victor Kenneth Angell Mocksville 

Susan Violette Brain Somerset, MA 

Mohamed Kamal Jamaluddin Bentong, Phang, Malaysia 

Weichen Lien Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Edward Ignatius Matthews Raleigh 

Alfred Gerald Strickland Bunn 

Brian David Wright Chicago, IL 

Shiuh-Liang Yan Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Robert Alfredo Nunez Quito, Ecuador 

Jingyuan Wang Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Ladson Montgomery Brearley, Jr Hamlet 

Han-Chieh Chiu Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Joanne Cherin Eder Virginia Beach, VA 

♦Gregory Gene Emanuel North Bend, NE 

Kenneth Jeffery Greene Lenoir 

Rosli Bin Hamir Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 

Jing-Jong Jang Raleigh 

Martha Alicia Laverde Barranquilla, Colombia 

Mauricio Rodrigo Ledesma Quito, Ecuador 

Yuchi Liu Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Jenghwa Lyan Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

David Andrew Nailor Durham 

Steven Kent Rogers Asheville 

Bruce Samuel Surface Warsaw, IN 

Wen Wang Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Erwin Thompson William III Lumberton 

MASTER OF COMPUTER STUDIES 
Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Yu-Chung Chou Raleigh 

David Alfred Dodd Durham 

Anita Louise Hogans Jacksonville, FL 

Thomas Joseph Loos Ralston, NE 

Santanagopalan Surya Bombay, India 



*Co-major in Public Affairs 



76 



Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Shirley Hwang Chao Raleigh 

Tzyy-Yi Chen Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Tzau-Jin Chung Singapore 

Kai-Ling Duh Kaoshung, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Usha Konakanchi Kotamarti Vijayawada, India 

Tsung-Ying Lee Austin, TX 

Jiing-Kae Wu Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Yen-Shin Yeh Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Fu-Shin Yen Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Suck Won Hong Seoul, Korea 

Hong-Jyeh Huan Singapore 

Terrence Allen Kanka Omaha, NE 

Melinda Ann Kellum Jacksonville 

Charles Ray Kirk Raleigh 

Karen Downer Mitchell Columbia, MD 

Mary Elizabeth O'Connor Raleigh 

Jack Joseph Rouse Kinston 

Danny Ira Wellisch Asheville 

Tzung-Hsing Wong Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

MASTER OF ECONOMICS 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Bruce Louis Ahrendsen Oxford Junction, IA 

Aleta Catamora Domdom Raleigh 

Marcelle Benrimokh Thomas Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Antonios Evangelos Agatsas Theves, Greece 

David Shelton Brown, Jr Raleigh 

Lesli Liliana Castillo-Sierra Comayaguela, Honduras 

Belin Chang Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Young Sook Eom Jeon Je, Korea 

Ayse Canan Karayalcin Ankara, Turkey 

Kalliope S. Magoula Athens, Greece 

Mark Sigel Mather Cincinnati, OH 

Laura Jean Norwood Raleigh 

Jose Augusto Sierra Tegucigalpa, Honduras 

Jeffery Lee Ward Asheville 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Rangachari Arvind New Delhi, India 

Melissa Bell Cox Wake Forest 

Dennis Royce Davis Marion 

Annette Carlyle Holt Raleigh 

Abdul Latif Fakhruddin Hossain Durham 

Connie Beth Parnell Ivey Lumberton 

Stephen Lindblad MacDonald Durham 

Allen Warren McDowell Wilmington 

Guido Phillip Pfuhl Raleigh 

Samuel Lewis Robinson Marshville 

Edward Bruce Teachey Greensboro 

Ping Zhang Tai'an, People's Republic of China 



77 



MASTER OF EDUCATION 

Adult and Community College Education 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Fred Wallace Bayley Morganton 

James Keith Letchworth Raleigh 

Sujata Acharya Maitra Cary 

George Wallace Stancil Newton 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Margaret Elaine McEwen Raleigh 

Claus Monrad Spliid Aarn, Denmark 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

William Wright Baggett Clinton 

William George Bickel Raleigh 

Susan Louise Hollenbach : Raleigh 

Mark Cooke Joyner Statesville 

Sriprakash Sriram Mayasandra Bombay, India 

Mary Ruth Lewis Russ Bolivia 

Tracey Sumner Thompson Raleigh 

Martha Warren Warner Newton Grove 

Agricultural Education 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Samuel Eugene Groce Siler City 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Robert Woolard Clark, Jr Williamston 

Michael Ward Shaw Chadbourn 

Sylvia Jean White Smith Kinston 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Dale Scott Cochran Concord 

Weldon Wright Faircloth Autryville 

James Thomas Parsons Fuquay-Varina 

Michele Grady Spence Hookerton 

Paul Wesley Wilson Sanford 

Curriculum and Instruction 
Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Deborah Ann Wilson Holland Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Jacqueline Devon Dove Kinston 

Patsy Carroll Gentry Cary 

Susan Winslow Mastro Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Becky Lynn Gerber Raleigh 

Karen Chaney Kauffman Joliet, IL 

Deborah Spragins Maness Roanoke Rapids 

Heidi Maria Nuttle Raleigh 

Regina Kay Oakes Boone 



78 



Educational Administration and Supervision 
Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Lina McCullers Sanders Smithfield 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Eddie Bernard Clinton High Point 

Mary Nell Lee Ferguson Raleigh 

Guidance and Personnel Services 
Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Barbara Ann Briggs Raleigh 

Bonita Tyndall Cooley Goldsboro 

Susan Ellen Gorman Cincinnati, OH 

Ronald Wayne Hardison Jacksonville 

Claude Alan Lee Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Virgilia Moore Raleigh 

Elgina Demetrius Reaves Bear Creek 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Sonia Melton Barnes Wilson 

Ann Louise Brooks Raleigh 

Velma Jeffers Bullock Raleigh 

Mary Elsie Daisey Raleigh 

Carolyn McLean Fox Raleigh 

Elizabeth Leigh Gainor Charlotte 

Barbara Jean Gegg-Harrison Raleigh 

Suzanne McMillen Goerger Garner 

Mary Pleasants Hogg Garner 

Patricia Thompson Laniak Durham 

Marian Bridget Lawhorn Jacksonville 

Eddie Wayne Lawrence Rocky Mount 

Mary Deaton Love Raleigh 

Walter Manuel III Fair Bluff 

Carol Ginn Nobles Raleigh 

Robert Murray Parker Chapel Hill 

Andrea Dobson Vest Raleigh 

John Arrington Williams II Oxford 

Mathematics Education 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Melissa Ann Best Fayetteville 

Jesse Louis Capps Raleigh 

Timothy Wayne Tucker Rocky Mount 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Lezlie Duncan Covington Raleigh 

Julia Starr Garner 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Dara Faye Royal Fayetteville 



79 



Middle Grades Education 
Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Suzanne Marie Downs Raleigh 

Occupational Education 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Susan Jane Lamb Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Ronald Glenn Grady Mount Olive 

Ruth Dupree Petrea Durham 

Science Education 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Eira Marie Longstreth McDaniel Manchester, TN 

Martha Glenn Bradshaw Ramsey Wendell 

Janet Lynch Sullivan Cary 

Daniel Leonard West Garner 

Special Education 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Olivia Green Day Summit, NJ 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Nafisa Rene Keels Cary 

Deveney Tucker Sweetser Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Kim Kauffman Battaglia Durham 

Susan Warren Gilbert Salisbury 

Gloria Hines Jones Bailey 

Robin Mills Overcash Concord 

Beverley Mary Williams Raleigh 

MASTER OF ENGINEERING 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Henry Powell Dozier Wilmington 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Nancy Ellen Joyner Black Mountain 

MASTER OF FORESTRY 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Kalutantri Patabendi Ariyadasa Barapola, Sri Lanka 

Jerry Lamont Bettis, Sr Raleigh 

Charles Corson Bolton, Jr Winston-Salem 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Gery Allan Glover Temple Hills, MD 



80 



Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Michael Elmo Drilling Amherst, NY 

Daniel Fairley Mclnnis, Jr Raleigh 

Kyung-Whan Pak Seoul, Korea 

David Thompson Tew Thomasville 

MASTER OF INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS 
ENGINEERING 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Bruce Raymond Cary 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Pai-Chou Chen Panchiao, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Paul James Guidry, Jr Gainesville, FL 

Herman Heung Modesto, CA 

Michael Francis Hitchcock Louisville, KY 

Roderick Bao-Buo Ma Raleigh 

Russell Raymond Mann Valparaiso, IN 

John Frederick McKirachan, Jr Columbia, MD 

Ibrahim Mounib Richani Raleigh 

Chao-Hsin Sun South Amboy, NJ 

Kun-Hui Tsai Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Tony Lee Hudson Goldsboro 

Bobby Kent Potts, Jr High Point 

Tibebu Senbetta Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Michael Joseph Gibbons Raleigh 

Pamela Holley Granade Raleigh 

Wendy Caye Moses Raleigh 

Kenneth Joseph Natoli Virginia Beach, VA 

Daphne Evelyn Souder Rockville, MD 

Teikhoe Wong Saint Louis, MO 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Chester William Hunter Youngstown, OH 

John Frederick Wettstein Winter Park, FL 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Harold Hoyt Bangs III Raleigh 

Nancy Jill Coleman Chapel Hill 

Marlys Ann de Alba Raleigh 

Robert Joseph Harned, Jr Madison 

David Glenn Heiser Raleigh 

Bradford Charles Houk Bloomsburg, PA 

Elizabeth Ann Kirkland Raleigh 

Paul Joseph Klens Mill Hall, PA 

Yi-in Lin Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Mary Catherine Mattocks Raleigh 

Kathryn Ruth McPherson .• Raleigh 

John David Penkacik Orlando, FL 



81 



Elizabeth Ballard Simons Wilmington 

Rachel Marie Therrien Raleigh 

Peter Ryan Williamson Raleigh 

MASTER OF LIFE SCIENCES 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Wilson Douglas Brame Durham 

Barry Reid Keith Marion, IN 

Jenny Grace Smith Raleigh 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Annette Denise Dickens Erie, PA 

MASTER OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Yu David Chen Tanshui, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Kirsten Petersen Kunz Amherst, NH 

MASTER OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Dimitri Athanasios Keranis Athens, Greece 

Jong-Huei Lin Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Gwa-Guang Tan Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Juhchin Angus Yang Fengshen, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Kuang-Chung Chao Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Fereydoon Souresrafil Wilmington 

Mark Jerome Weber Wake Forest 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Yung-Pyng Chang Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Shin-Yuh Chern Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Hsiang-Chen Hsu Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Shanghsu Liao Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Richard Achidi Mofor N. W. Province, Cameroon 

Charles Joyce Moore, Jr Tempe, AZ 

Hosein Zadafshar Isfahan, Iran 

MASTER OF NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 
Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Brett Ward Carlsen Pocatello, ID 

John Norman Miller, Jr Fayetteville, AR 

MASTER OF PRODUCT DESIGN 
Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Joselyn Margaret Berry Durham 

Sherry Fresia Blankenship Raleigh 

Barbara Loucas Conrad Raleigh 

Jeffrey Wilson Grubbs Black Mountain 

Eric Nathan Wiebe Durham 



82 



Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Susan Jean Bukowski Union Mills, IN 

Ding-Bang Luh Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Hao Pin Pu Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

David Justino Urena Bristol, TN 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Dana Alexandra Bartelt Raleigh 

David Andrew Brown Manhattan, KS 

Hui-Jin Chuang Chungli, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Linda Carol Dallas Raleigh 

John Edward Fels Saint Louis, MO 

Ellen Rosalind Hood Mebane 

Larry Frederick James Raleigh 

Obelia Johnson Goldsboro 

John Francis Kasper Plattsburgh, NY 

Maria Roxana Maksymowych Willow Grove, PA 

Ann Carter Sprinkle, Jr Raleigh 

Roopa Sunil Sreedharan Daly City, CA 

William Bouknight Tyler Richmond, VA 

MASTER OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Thomas Lee Bennett Apex 

Elisha Thomas Bert Raleigh 

Anne Sharpe Cochrane Raleigh 

Hyacinth Chinedum Ezeamii Nimo, Anambra, Nigeria 

Linda Polaski Honeycutt Johnsonburg, PA 

Mary Elisa Keech Raleigh 

Zeph J. Putnam Angier 

Carla Janell Hobbs Stephens Fayetteville 

Scott Kevin Townsend Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Nancy Carol Collins High Point 

Eleanor Arey Cornish Raleigh 

George Stuart Crockett Alexandria, VA 

Miles Melvin Hamby Raleigh 

Deborah Kay Lamm Wilson 

Cheryl Joan Mcllquham Fond du Lac, WI 

Oladipo Adelakun Oluwole Lagos, Nigeria 

John Joseph Salengo Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Saul Abreu Bonao, Dominican Republic 

Jimmie Gray Armstrong, Jr Rocky Mount 

Leslie Annette Brown Charlotte 

Kevin Jerome Gergely Welch, WV 

Lorna Ellen Gerome-Crowder Harrisonburg, VA 

Robert Otis Jenkins Ellenboro 

Michael Roberts Lloyd Raleigh 

Sylvia Douglas Nygard Cary 

Anne Morgan Williams Raleigh 



83 



MASTER OF RECREATION RESOURCES ADMINISTRATION 
Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Cheng-I Chen Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Deborah Ying Harrison Framington, MO 

**Roy Eric Jensen Durham 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Michael Garrett Kent Raleigh 

Sheryl Ann Rudd Wilson 

***Laura Valerius Shreveport, LA 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Curtis Todd Sinclair Mahomet, IL 

MASTER OF SOCIOLOGY 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Cyd Shauneille Buck New Bern 

MASTER OF STATISTICS 
Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Joan Fiorello Barrett Cary 

Adam Paul Holtzman Raleigh 

Shigeo Kawahata Nishinomiya, Hyogo, Japan 

Heungsun Park Seoul, Korea 

Fouad Gabriel Younan Baghdad, Iraq 

MASTER OF TEXTILES 
Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Wayne Donald Magerl North Wales, PA 

Bharat Patel Charlotte 

Baruch Porath Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Judson Wade Carter Raleigh 

Ingrid Johnson New York, NY 

MASTER OF TOXICOLOGY 
Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Michael John Kohan Dayton, OH 

MASTER OF WOOD AND PAPER SCIENCE 
Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Jerry Van Midyette Engelhard 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Rokiah Hashim Selangor, Malaysia 

Othman Sulaiman Selangor, Malaysia 



and *** Co-major: Public Affairs 



84 



Master of Arts Degrees 




Archival Management 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Anita Denise Haynes Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Donna Kelly Flowers Raleigh 

Ann Patterson Renegar Monroe 

Tyler Otto Walters Chapel Hill 

English 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Virginia Herren Connell Douglasville, GA 

Melissa Ann Moore Houston, TX 

Daniel Nolan Neil Raleigh 

Muri-lyn Bearfield Pugh Cary 

Belinda Marsha Bulla Shaaban Charlotte 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Keith Joseph Faivre Tenafly, NJ 

Judith Stone Ghoneim Fayetteville 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Winifred DeGray Cherry Raleigh 

Robanna Sumrell Knott Raleigh 

Damienne Palazzola Real Ann Arbor, MI 

Peggy Carol Williamson Wiggins Raleigh 

History 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Mary Frances Morrow Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Philip Chumley Cope Montreat 

Michelle Scott Ivey Wilson 

Jacqueline Suzanne Yang Raleigh 

Political Science 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Stephen Richard Aylward Portland, ME 

Alan Charles Sanger Coolidge, AZ 

Mark Anthony Swaringen North Fort Myers, FL 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Lee Franklin Duffy Vicksburg, MS 

85 



Master of Science Degrees 




Adult and Community College Education 
Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Edna Johnson Black Williamsville, NY 

Victor Carlyle Scott Pulaski, VA 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

John Mark Pettitt Greensboro 

Aerospace Engineering 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Paul Dexter Frymier, Jr Plymouth 

Edgar North Rudisill, Jr Hendersonville 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Jassim Abbass Al-Saadi Bryson City 

Armin Martin Moerz Pfronten, West Germany 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Charles Cochran Fenno, Jr Raleigh 

Christopher Joseph Riley Newton 

Chad Joseph Yetka Goldsboro 

Agricultural Economics 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Dale Clayton Miller Apex 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Kevin Edward Jack Loudonville, NY 

Animal Science 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Lennie June Samsell Morganton, WV 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Margaret Ann Lamb Tigard, OR 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Marjorie Alice Faust Kempton, PA 

Thomas William Powel Union Bridge, MD 

Biochemistry 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Inga Chalet Brandon Greensboro 

86 



Biological and Agricultural Engineering 
Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Eric Todd Weatherly Columbia 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Matthew Scott Howarth Athens, GA 

Mark Michael Wilsnack Dover, DE 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Gerald Lee Cain, Jr Raleigh 

Ping Liang Guangxi, People's Republic of China 

Biomathematics 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Jennifer Marie Webb Marion 

Botany 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Tracie Lynn Bradshaw Morganton 

Lynne Alese Dengler Pottstown, PA 

David Wilson Freshwater Morehead City 

James John Polashock Saddle Brook, NJ 

Dora Liverman Som-Pimpong Greensboro 

Richard Hulse Stickney, Jr Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Stephanie Jane Horton Burnsville 

Sharon Brown Settlage Sharpsburg, GA 

Chemical Engineering 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Timothy John Bauer Madison, NJ 

Theodore Andrew Walter Durham 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Sylvia Mizelle Hardison Jamesville 

William Preston Wright, Jr Burlington 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Daniel Robert Brouns Rockville, MD 

Shelley Elizabeth Peters Omaha, NE 

Jeffrey Gerard Sczechowski Troy, MI 

Christian Louis Traynelis Morgantown, WV 

Chemistry 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Sholeh Jabarzadeh-Azar Isfahan, Iran 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

David Gray Anderson Southern Pines 

Hanna Assefa Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 



87 



Civil Engineering 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Frank Michael Altimore Raleigh 

Joseph Allen Wolhar Charlotte 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Frank Kyunghwan Park Raleigh 

Hilal Abdallah Saadi Acre, Palestine 

Thomas Eliot Tallman Bethesda, MD 

Pamela Beth Townsend Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Fouad Kamal Abu-Arbid Beirut, Lebanon 

Bashar Suleiman Rihani Amman, Jordan 

Computer Studies 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Kelvin Sebron Bryant Fayetteville 

Elizabeth Spangler Lewisburg, WV 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Carole Lee English Raleigh 

Anwer Zuheir Kotob Damascus, Syria 

David Brown McNeill Sanford 

Manoj Ramchandra Patwardhan Bombay, India 

Crop Science 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Brenda Carol Gwynn Oxford 

Thomas Mekontchou Maroua, Cameroon 

Inigo Pfeiffer Madrid, Spain 

Mark Allan Tucker Madison 

Randall H. White Clymer 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Jean Louise Dowty Bakersfield, CA 

Ziya Gizlice Adana, Turkey 

Irwin Lee Goldman Skokie, IL 

Victoria Erasga Matalog Los Banos, Laguna, Philippines 

Timothy Dale Phillips Raleigh 

Richard Jay Sloane Los Angeles, CA 

Tirtoboma Jakarta, Indonesia 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Robert Parsons Ewing Chapel Hill 

David Lindley Jordan Edenton 

David Ronald Lawson Saint Charles, MO 

Kenneth Neil McCaskill Sylva 

Wan Zaki Bin Wan Mamat Kuala Trengganu, Malaysia 

Daniel Roy Wendt Whiteland, IN 

Curriculum and Instruction 
Degree Conferred May 7,1988 

Joy Matheson Collins Cary 



88 



Ecology 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Jeffrey Griffin Bruton Fayetteville 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Susan Marie Alexander Greenville, SC 

Mark Steven Basel Cary 

Andrew Thomas Brown Huntsville, AL 

Lawrence William Cook Palm Bay, FL 

Everett Jackson Dunning, Jr Charlotte 

Kenneth Wilson Fernald Autryville 

Wen Jenq Derek Hwang Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Mark Joel Lanzo Durham 

Yihong Liao Quingdao, People's Republic of China 

Li-Hsin David Lu Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Randy Grey Martinez Raleigh 

Mark Devere Strickland Raleigh 

Jean Elizabeth Van Well Dallas, TX 

Simon Verghese Cary 

Guor-Jang Wur Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Denis Aulagnier Marseille, France 

Sheila Benf ield Banks Asheville 

William Edward Batchelor Raleigh 

Mark Edward Boduch Lenoir 

Darol Chamberlain Raleigh 

Far-Yung Chen Chu-Tung, Taiwan, Republic of China 

John Randall Cooper Greenville 

Edward Robert Deak Mechanicsburg, PA 

Richard Washington Flatow Mexico City, Mexico 

Avinash Laxman Ghirnikar Bombay, India 

Michael Dennis Haynes Morganton 

Yaw-Ting Ho Chiayi, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Wendy Kay Hodgin Wilmington 

Wen-Chau Hou Chia-Yi City, Taiwan, Republic of China 

David Charles Jarman Jacksonville 

Richard Lewis Johnson, Jr Charlotte 

Danny Jonathan Winston-Salem 

Yun Sun Kang Seoul, Korea 

Yungsik Kim Incheon, Korea 

Rajan Vasudev Kuruppillai Bombay, India 

Jong Keuk Lee Taegu, Korea 

Nai-Hui Liao Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Kailih David Lin Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Sanjay Nayak Raipur, M.P., India 

Jaideep Prakash Raleigh 

John Claassen Roberts Chapel Hill 

Tasneem Saleh Dhaka, Bangladesh 

John Dai-Lun Sun Melbourne Beach, FL 

Paul David Thieken Raleigh 

Kalavathy Venkataramana Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Robert Francis Allan Cary 

Gregory Thomas Brauns Pleasant Garden 



89 



Ming Pin Chang Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Chih-Fu Edward Chen Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Tyan-Far Chen San Jose, CA 

Woei-Kae Chen Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Jae-Ho Choi Seoul, Korea 

Stephen Samuel Crutchfield Milton 

Paramesh Sampatrai Desai Cary 

Timothy Lee Droz Raleigh 

Bonnie Louise Franke West Caldwell, NJ 

Milind Shrikant Gadekar Bombay, India 

Jeffery Scott Hines Raleigh 

Jun-Shong Huang Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Thomas Ashford Hughes, Jr Raleigh 

George Chih Wen Hwa Beijing, People's Republic of China 

Jzan-Ching Jerry Jeen Hsin-Chu City, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Fuyung Lai Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Hsin-Chang Sanko Lan Elmhurst, NY 

Mao-Shen Lin Kaohsung, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Jin-Kun Lin Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Wu Sho-Zu Lin Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Hsiao-Cheng J. Liu Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Richard Gary Minor Raleigh 

Hyunmin Park Seoul, Korea 

James Clarence Parker Asheville 

Pankaj Rasiklal Parmar Raleigh 

Prayson Will Pate Durham 

Mark Paul Peters Raleigh 

Kenneth Eugene Polleck Raleigh 

Mark Glenn Powell Ellenboro 

****Mark Roger Promislow Charlotte 

Roberto Salama Cochabamba, Bolivia 

Saurin Bharatkumar Shroff Bombay, India 

Kwee Teng Soh Cirebon, Indonesia 

Mark Harold Van Horn Raleigh 

Shiuh-Chong Louis Wang San Jose, CA 

Yih-Jiahn Wang Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Joel Mark Yarborough Winston-Salem 

Tong-Fei Yeh Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Edward William Yohon, Jr Rochester, NY 

Ichiro Yoshida Yokohama, Japan 

Shiming Zhan Urumqi, People's Republic of China 

Entomology 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

James Dale Barbour Lafayette, IN 

Thomas Patrick Keeley Raleigh 

Sergio Orduz Bucaramanga, Colombia 

Maria Robin Share Howard Beach, NY 

Hung-Wen Shen Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Joseph Arthur Browde, Jr Durham 

Gwen Ann Pearson Conroe, TX 

Lanionel Leodegario Tromp Curacao, Netherlands Antilles 



****(Co-major in Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering) 

90 



Food Science 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Judith Ann Dudziak Minneapolis, MN 

Melissa LuAnn Fulp Winston-Salem 

Donald Lewis Higgins Raleigh 

Michele Davis Keziah Charlotte 

Karen Hoff Myers Atlanta, GA 

*****Debora Varon Raleigh 

Ruth Hamrick Watkins Cary 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Vivian Marie Higgins Raleigh 

Ruth Price McGuire Lancaster, SC 

Jianqing Wu Zhejiang, People's Republic of China 

Forestry 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Gordon McKee Cressman Cary 

Ruy Teixeira Lima Cach. de Itapemirim, Brazil 

Mark Tonry Senior Bernardsville, NJ 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Claudio Emilio Balocchi Valdivia, Chile 

Charles John McCormick, Jr Cohasset, MA 

B. Dipak Upadhyay Goushala, Kathmandu, Nepal 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Doreen Alana Liner Danbury, CT 

Genetics 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Susan Elmore Stamper Raleigh 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Leslie Ann Bethards Okemos, MI 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

David Franklin McCarn Badin 

Guidance and Personnel Services 
Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Harriet Platts Adams Kinston 

Trudi Mildred Crozier Raleigh 

Cecil Harold McManus Waxhaw 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Linda Carol Greene Stanley 



*Co-major in Horticultural Science. See page 92. 

91 



Horticultural Science 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Robert Davey Belding Little Falls, NJ 

Mary Anne Depa Sterling Heights, MI 

*****Debora Varon Raleigh 

Mark Herlong Yonce Moncks Corner, SC 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Steven Glynn Russell Cabot, AR 

Industrial Engineering 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Michael Anthony Boggi Stratford, NJ 

Christina Unrein King Cary 

Steve King Monteith Raleigh 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Damodar Anand Ramanuj Bangalore, India 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

William Clifford Burton Baldwinsville, NY 

Nathan Charles Claridy Lakeland, FL 

Edward Steven Henkler Durham 

Sumant Mehta New Delhi, India 

Theodore Marcel Reymann Hartville, OH 

Dann George Salami South Charleston, WV 

Management 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Ann Rutledge Bowen Raleigh 

Patricia Lynn Colelli Cary 

Gary Lynn Davis Raleigh 

Mohammad Innamur Razzak Dhaka, Bangladesh 

Pierre Nocolas Van Peteghem Brussels, Belgium 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Karan Melinda Bunn Raleigh 

Kenneth Alan Davis Raleigh 

Glenn Richard Matteson Raleigh 

Kevin Ike Pait Raleigh 

Amit Lai Patra Durham 

Bobby Lee Pellegrini Winston-Salem 

William Clint Weathers Southern Pines 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

William Pitt Isley Wilmington 

Sean Quinn McClellan Durham 

Suha Ahmad Sabi Qalqilya, Palestine 



*Co-major in Food Science. See page 91. 



92 



Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 
Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Nizar Shabib Abu-Jaber Amman, Jordan 

Katherine Anne Brehme Winston-Salem 

John David Pickle Lancaster, PA 

Robin Raible Reynolds Ozark, AK 

Frank Harrison Ruggiero Lyndhurst, NJ 

Donna Marie Wojtak Tappan, NY 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Anto Francis Akkarappuram Raleigh 

Kirankumar Venkata Alapati Raleigh 

Gregory Matthew Cambareri Greensboro 

David Lee Epperson Columbus, IN 

John Edward Nelsen, Jr Erie, PA 

Thomas Mac Nelson Perryville, MO 

Edward Harrison Stephens Raleigh 

Kim Margaret Talbert California, MD 

Marine Sciences 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Frank Marcus Gupton Raleigh 

Materials Science and Engineering 
Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Robert Mark Davis Fayetteville 

Edward Roy Myers Springfield, IL 

Stephen John Wrinn Cary 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Atul C. Ajmera Calcutta, India 

Jong Keun Jung Seoul, Korea 

Tracy Elizabeth Rothwell Cary 

Sujit Sharan Ranchi, India 

Rajiv Kumar Singh Howrah, India 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Amit Chandravadan Garni Raleigh 

Eric Lee Gaylord Matthews 

James Bruce White Durham 

Mathematics 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Nur Azlina Bt Abd Aziz Seremban, N. Sembilan, Malaysia 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Chul Kim Seoul, Korea 

Mathematics (Applied) 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

John Grady Collinsworth Newport 

James Dean Creasman Andrews 



93 



Ahmad Basel Kanawati Damascus, Syria 

Jung-Soon Kim Lee Daegu, Korea 

Aminah Bt Nik Taib Petaling Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia 

Aziah Shamsuddin Perak, Malaysia 

Suzanne Sumner Greensboro 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Wan Ainun Mior-Othman Perak, Malaysia 

Sophfronia Germaine Tucker Ridgeville, SC 

Saundra Denice Wall Rockingham 

Kevin Dean Yeomans Lumber City, GA 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Keith Eugene Crowe Morganton 

Donna Lyn Guarino Wilmington 

Ismail Bin Kamis Johor, Malaysia 

Sarina Bt. Md. Jam Bayan Lepas, Penang, West Malaysia 

Ming-Ching Diana Shyu Moscow, ID 

Mechanical Engineering 
Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Gregory Everett Smith Mount Holly 

James Myron Smith Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Myungjin Choi Seoul, Korea 

Karen Lynn Core Raleigh 

Adnan Ertay Limasol, Cyprus 

Thomas W. Groot Chapel Hill 

Michael William Hiller New York City, NY 

Cheng-Hung Huang Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Fariba Jabbarzadegan Tehran, Iran 

Jennifer Lynn Rhatigan Jacksonville, FL 

Jeffrey Thomas Warfford Lexington 

Grant Howell Williard Winston-Salem 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Charles Kelly Allred Mebane 

Richard Kendrick Coryell Rose Hill, KS 

Brian Arthur FitzGerald Parma Heights, OH 

Shang-Shyan Liao Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Derrick Yale Promislow Raleigh 

Microbiology 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Michael Alfonse DeGuglielmo Rocky Mount 

Anne Wendy Shrago Rocky Mount 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Michael Leroy Bruin Walnut Creek, CA 

David Andrew Winters Pittsburgh, PA 



94 



Nuclear Engineering 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Waheedul Haq Islamabad, Pakistan 

Woojune Yi Seoul, Korea 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Khalid Mohamed Al-Otaibi Jeddah, Saudi Arabia 

Nutrition 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Ann Elizabeth Petro Raleigh 

Pamela Long Spurlin Elizabeth City 

Occupational Education 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Deborah Wheeler Tiffany Durham 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Deborah Powers Hoy Cookeville, TN 

Operations Research 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Mary Aldridge Follas Apex 

Hilal Yousif Putrus Baghdad, Iraq 

Steven John Rawlick New Haven, CT 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Ricardo Jose Gomez Charlotte 

Ramzi Moufid Ziade Hammana, Lebanon 

Physics 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Christopher James Roddy Wilmington 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Brian Neal Davidson Raleigh 

Lindsey Neal Yadon Charlotte 

Physiology 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Kirstin Lise Pauling Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Lisa Andrews Dozier Wilmington 

Maura G. Will Klinge Durham 

Mary Ann Tillett McBride Raleigh 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

Sandra Karen Johnson Asheville 



95 



Plant Pathology 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Alberto Raul Escande Mar del Plata, Argentina 

Stephanie Anne Fore Chapel Hill 

Theresa Ann Frisina Wappingers Falls, NY 

Brent Steven Sipes Bolingbrook, IL 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Vermando Masinsin Aquino Laguna, Philippines 

Tsega Berecket Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 

Marcus Dixon Law Harrisville, WV 

Michael Joseph Munster LaCrosse, WI 

Psychology 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Leslie Elizabeth Carter Lynchburg, VA 

Patrick Lawrence McMurtry Waverly, TN 

Sherry Lynn Turner Memphis, TN 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Julia Malaea King Monroe 

Anne Bittinger White Raleigh 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Elizabeth Doughton Greulich Pittsburgh, PA 

Nancy Helen Koester Raleigh 

Victoria Lee Reardin Bloomsburg, PA 

Maureen Odilia Vandermaas Charlotte 

Recreation Resources Administration 
Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Carter Joseph Betz Denver, CO 

Degree Conferred May 7, 1988 

George Nevin Lipscomb Rockville, MD 

Rural Sociology 

Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Christina Margaret Klaas Poughkeepsie, NY 

Taehong Sohn Pusan, Korea 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Mary Frances McKenzie Winston-Salem 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Jon Lee Wiggs Wendell 

Maria Winchell Rochester, NY 

Soil Science 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Richard Eric Gauger Waseca, MN 



96 



Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Sarah Jane Lein Arlington, IA 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Sheunesu Mpepereki Mpofu Harare, Zimbabwe 

Eleazar Rafael Salazar Caracas, Venezuela 

Textile Chemistry 

Degree Conferred August 5, 1987 

Aida Vinent Garrard Fayetteville 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Herbert Mathole Lulube Plumtree, Zimbabwe 

Sherri Antoinette Satterwhite Hebron, IN<? 

Wrennie Naomi Sommerville Raleigh 

Textiles 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

Robert Warren Fontaine Gettysburg, PA 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Anne Long Crews Butner 

John Victor Gournas Raleigh 

Kerri Alexis Kolehma Rocky Mount 

Barbara Ann Matthews Raleigh 

Amitkumar Manoharrao Paradkar Badlapur, India 

Al-Karim Janmohamed Thawer Dar-Es-Salaam, Tanzania 

Toxicology 

Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Kevin Eugene Powell Apex 

Garry Wong Sacramento, CA 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Johnny Michael Sanders Franklin 

Hala Tayel Shehata-Karam Raleigh 

Jane Kay Smollinger Bethlehem, PA 

Degree Conferred December 15,1987 

Robert Alan Bulbs Morgantown, WV 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Hans Walter Heidner Santa Barbara, CA 

Marsha Dean Wilburn Ward Cary 

Zoology 

Degree Conferred December 15, 1987 

John Joseph Fried New Hyde Park, NY 

Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Cresada Angela Buchanan Greensboro 

Lisa Dawn Gates Raleigh 

Steven Howard Neptun Cherry Hill, NJ 

97 



DOCTOR OF 
VETERINARY MEDICINE 




SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 
Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Wendy Jo Alphin Durham 

Deborah Karen Anderson Carrboro 

Margaret Ann Anderson Enka-Candler 

Kenneth Raymond Brodie Hendersonville 

Laurel Denise Brooks Clayton 

David Hugh Close Trenton, NJ 

Patrick Michael Comyn Mill Spring 

Elizabeth Anne Daughtry Gaithersburg, MD 

James Wilson DeBell Winston-Salem 

Julie L. Doub Winston-Salem 

Amy Feher Edwards Ahoskie 

David Powell Elliott Raleigh 

Linda Ellen Erday Garner 

Lora Elizabeth Evans Salisbury 

Richard Thomas Evans, Jr Greensboro 

Bernard Martin Fischer Chapel Hill 

Jennifer Susan Foshee Cary 

Randolph Cochrane Frantz Southern Pines 

Michael Patrick Gallup Raleigh 

Ginny Lou Grant Hendersonville 

James Mark Hammer Ayden 

Hope Laura House West Covina, CA 

Ronald Earl Johnson, Jr Pink Hill 

Holly Lynn Jordan Durham 

James Stanley Kittrell Greenville 

Adrian Matthews Kreeger Pfafftown 

Dina Michele Lawrence Kannapolis 

Cynthia Judson Lees Winston-Salem 

Edward Maris Lineberger Belmont 

William Charles Marlatt II Garner 

Donna Ontene Matthews Winston-Salem 

Donna Jan McLamb Benson 

John Thomas McLean IV Lincolnton 

Mark Allen McMahon Morganton 

Gerald Scott Melton Rutherfordton 

Christine Lee Merrill Raleigh 

Angela Adams Mitchell Asheville 

Teresa Clark Moazed Charlotte 

Mary Belle Myers Union Grove 

John Norman Norton II Thomasville 

Linton Bertram Palmer Waynesville 

Cheryl Lane Parker Smithfield 

Barbara Ann Pollard Greensboro 

Kathy Ann Rash Statesville 

Ann Robin Ratchford Dallas 



98 



Douglas Leonard Reece w - . „ , 

Joseph Keith Reid . Winston-Salem 

Karen linger Rosenthal ...'.' C |™? 

Irene Mary Rusnak Jr\ . g £ 

John Joseph Santilli .'.'.' Kateigh 

James Eugene Schacht " ml '9*3* 

Susan Frieda Schopler ... p. C ™ 

David Franklin Scotton ... C ™ pel £ ,n 

Suzanne Riley Sewell . ^ller City 

Carolyn Harrison Smoak ..'.".' .' ;; Cha ft 

John Patrick Soles ... ^apel H ' n 

Daniel James Stack .. . Whitevdle 

Catherine Muir Starkweather wii' ' '•' 'J #£ 

Suzanne ZoeSulka . Wdmington DE 

Carole Ann Thomas ..." W.nston-Salem 

Heath Carl Thomas .' ~ " Wll ?°, n 

Joanne Thompson . Greenville 

David Michael Tillson '" ...Aurora 

Clayton Charles Watkins Jamestown 

Paul Edward Whippo . . Lexington 

Doby Wren Whited ... ■., Da llas 

Annette Joyce Wilson .. Mebane 

Vivian Anne Winstead « * ", °™™ 

Cindy Joy Yetka Rocky Mount 

Goldsboro 



99 



Doctor of Education Degrees 



Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

Charles Lincoln Barton, Educational Administration and Supervision 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Industrial Image: North Carolina High School Seniors' Per- 
ception of the Textile Industry. (Under the direction of William B. Harvey.) 

Pamela Uremovich Grey, Adult and Community College Education 
Raleigh North Carolina 

Dissertation: An Analysis of Levels of Self-efficacy and Associated Factors 
for the Career-related Competencies of Top Administrators in Two-year 
Colleges. (Under the direction of R. David Mustian.) 

Joyce Leslie MacKinnon, Educational Administration and Supervision 
Carrboro, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Relations among Patient Management Problems, Critical 
Thinking Abilities and Professional Knowledge Levels Attained by Physi- 
cal Therapy Students. (Under the direction of Bruce B. Beezer.) 

Sandra Raiford McCullen, Guidance and Personnel Services 
Dudley, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Cognitive-Moral Development of Counselors-in-train- 
ing. (Under the direction of Don C. Locke.) 

Elizabeth Anna Swainson Weir, Curriculum and Instruction 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Levels of Phonemic Awareness in Early Readers. (Under the 
direction of Barbara J. Fox.) 



Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Jerry William Barker, Adult and Community College Education 
Danville, Virginia 

Dissertation: Perceived Wellness Needs of University Employees and 
Variations in Relation to Personal and Employment Characteristics. 
(Under the direction of J. Conrad Glass, Jr.) 

Brian Christopher Findsen, Adult and Community College Education 
Hamilton, New Zealand 

Dissertation: The Process of International Graduate Student Adjustment. 
(Under the direction of Edgar J. Boone.) 

Lorraine Adams Gail, Guidance and Personnel Services 

Greensboro, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Group Career Peer Counseling as an Intervention for the 

Development of Moral Judgment and Career Planfulness among Senior 

High School Learning Disabled Students. (Under the direction of Don C. 

Locke.) 



100 



John Thomas German, Adult and Community College Education 
Boomer, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Factors Related to Supervisors' Perceptions of Job Perfor- 
mance of Industrial Maintenance Personnel in Northwest North Carolina. 
(Under the direction of Edgar J. Boone and R. David Mustian.) 

Bobbie Kearns Reddick, Curriculum and Instruction 
Durham, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Relationship between Psychological Types and Ex- 
pressed Job Satisfaction of Nurse Educators. (Under the direction of Bar- 
bara M. Parramore and Judith A. Davis.) 

John Gilbert Richardson, Adult and Community College Education 
Nakina, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Capacity of the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Ser- 
vice to Deliver Technological Information: Perceptions of Agricultural 
Producers Who Are Users of Its Services. (Under the direction of Edgar J. 
Boone.) 

Jacqueline Rogers Scott, Guidance and Personnel Services 
Fair Bluff, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Cognitive Developmental Learning Theory Applied to Cross- 
age Tutoring of Elementary School Females in Mathematics. (Under the 
direction of Norman A. Sprinthall and Lawrence K. Jones.) 



Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Kenneth Arnold Boham, Adult and Community College Education 
Jackson, North Carolina 

Dissertation: An Analysis of the Career Paths of Mid- Atlantic Community 
College Presidents. (Under the direction of Edgar J. Boone.) 

Richard Wallace Bohannon, Adult and Community College Education 
Fayetteville, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Information Accessing Behavior of Physical Therapists. 
(Under the direction of R. David Mustian.) 

Harold David Bryant, Educational Administration and Supervision 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Descriptive Study of Hemispheric Preferences, Attribute 
Variables and Environmental Characteristics among School Administra- 
tors. (Under the direction of Elizabeth MacPhail-Wilcox and Jon C. 
Marshall.) 

Anna Carelli, Adult and Community College Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Factors Associated with Adult Education Administrators' 

Perception of Needed Competencies in Performing in the Six Role Areas 

Encompassed in Their Administrative Position. (Under the direction of J. 

Conrad Glass, Jr. and Edgar J. Boone.) 

Georgene Gaskill Eakes, Adult and Community College Education 
Greenville, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Grief Resolution in Hospice Nurses: An Exploration of 
Effective Methods. (Under the direction of Arlene Fingeret.) 



101 



Felix Yao Mensa Fiadjoe, Adult and Community College Education 
Anyako, Ghana 

Dissertation: Socio-cultural Factors That Farmers with Limited Re- 
sources Consider in Making Choices When Faced with Problematic Situa- 
tions in Their Farming Activities. (Under the direction of George L. Carter, 
Jr.) 

Denis Sherald Jackson, Occupational Education 
Newton Grove, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Academic Performance of Students Entering North 
Carolina State University between 1974 and 1984 through Traditional and 
Nontraditional Undergraduate Admissions Procedures. (Under the direc- 
tion of Joseph R. Clary and Farmer S. Smith.) 

Georgianna Smevog Langley, Adult and Community College Education 
Shelby, North Carolina 

Dissertation: A Needs Assessment of Staff Development Activities within 
the North Carolina Community College Systems. (Under the direction of R. 
David Mustian.) 

Charles Rupert McAdams III, Guidance and Personnel Services 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Promoting the Development of High-risk College Students 
through a Deliberate Psychological Education-based Freshman Orienta- 
tion Course. (Under the direction of Don C. Locke.) 

James Goodlet McDaniel, Occupational Education 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Comparison of Collaborative Components between Diploma 

Schools of Nursing That Are Open and Those That Have Closed. (Under the 

direction of Judith A. Davis and Linda S. Dillon.) 

Mazanah Muhamad, Adult and Community College Education 

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 

Dissertation: Ralph W. Tyler's Perspectives on Designing and Facilitating 

Adult Learning. (Under the direction of George L. Carter, Jr.) 

Othman Bin Haji Omar, Adult and Community College Education 
Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia 

Dissertation: Relationship between Organizational Context and Mission 
from the Perspective of a County Agricultural Extension Service. (Under 
the direction of George L. Carter, Jr.) 

Ronald Julian Plummer, Adult and Community College Education 
Randleman, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Conceptual Programming Model and the Integration of 
Telecommunications into the Instructional Program of North Carolina 
Community Colleges: Perceptions of Chief Academic Officers and Tele- 
communications Coordinators. (Under the direction of Edgar J. Boone.) 

Robert Earl Powell, Guidance and Personnel Services 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Moral and Ego Development among Female Criminal 

Offenders. (Under the direction of Don C. Locke.) 



102 



fesar* and c ° mmunity c ° iiege Educati - 

fqooTQ^n T " ite f a cy Then and Now: North Carolina and Wake County 
1900-1980. (Under the direction of R. David Mustian.) ^uniy, 

Philip Andrew Watkins, Occupational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Relationship of Person-Environment Congruence and 

Measured Satisfaction and Achievement of Students Enrolled in uZh 

School Automotive Mechanics Courses. (Under the di ecfion o V WilHat 

DeLuca and Richard E. Peterson.) 



103 



Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 



Degrees Conferred August 5, 1987 

K. Anand, Materials Science and Engineering 
Madras, India 

Dissertation: Effect of Microstructure on Local Impact Damage and Ero- 
sion of Cemented Carbides. (Under the direction of Hans Conrad.) 

Carrie Lillie Baker, Psychology 
Garner, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Relationship between K-ABC Factors and Woodcock- 
Johnson Achievement Scores for Reading Disabled Children. (Under the 
direction of Rachel F. Rawls and William P. Erchul.) 

Marcia Yowell Bingham, Psychology 
Cary, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Relationship of Subject, Task and Stimulus Characteris- 
tics to Holistic versus Analytic Processing on a Constrained Classification 
Task: Consideration of Three Models. (Under the direction of Patricia F. 
Horan.) 

Molly McElrath Bland, Genetics 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Dissertation: DNA Sequence Analysis of Mitochondrial Genes from Nico- 

tiana tabacum. (Under the direction of Dale F. Matzinger and Charles S. 

Levings III.) 

Clinton Lee Brown, Jr., Science Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Development and Evaluation of a Model Course in 
Advanced Biology for Secondary Education. (Under the direction of Nor- 
man D. Anderson.) 

Raymond Todd Brown, Psychology 

Hopewell, Virginia 

Dissertation: The Combined Effects of Noise and Interpersonal Distance 

on Human Information Processing Efficiency. (Under the direction of 

Richard G. Pearson.) 

Dae Won Byun, Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 

Andong, Korea 

Dissertation: A Two-dimensional Mesoscale Numerical Model of St. Louis 

Urban Mixed Layer. (Under the direction of S. Pal Arya.) 

Humberto Enrique Cabanillas, Plant Pathology 

Lambayeque, Peru 

Dissertation: Factors Influencing the Efficacy of Paecilomyces lilacinus in 

Biocontrol of Meloidogyne incognita on Tomato. (Under the direction of 

Kenneth R. Barker.) 

Fernando Castillo-Gonzalez, Crop Science 
Chapingo, Mexico 

Dissertation: Agronomic Evaluation of Latin American Maize Popula- 
tions. (Under the direction of Major M. Goodman.) 



104 



Charles Edouard Chassaing, Mechanical Engineering 
Asheville, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Acoustic Wave Propagation by Finite Elements and Time- 
step Integration. (Under the direction of Allen C. Eberhardt.) 

Chao-Lung Chen, Statistics 

Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: Estimation Problems in Group Testing. (Under the direction 

of William H. Swallow.) 

Chwen-Jinq Chen, Civil Engineering 
Kaoshiang, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: Bridge Management under a Level of Service Concept Pro- 
viding Optimum Improvement Action, Time and Budget Prediction. 
(Under the direction of David W. Johnston.) 

Lynn Farnam Dickey, Biochemistry 

Asheville, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Characterization of a Third Distinct Ferritin Subunit 

cDNA, the Corresponding Processed Pseudogene in Bullfrog Tadpole and 

Its Use in the Study of Translational Control. (Under the direction of 

Elizabeth C. Theil.) 

Brian James Eastwood, Statistics 

London, Ontario, Canada 

Dissertation: Confidence Interval Construction in Semi-nonparametric 

Regression Estimation. (Under the direction of A. Ronald Gallant.) 

Dennis Lee Eggett, Statistics 
American Fork, Utah 

Dissertation: A Comparative Evaluation of Some Statistics for Determin- 
ing the Limits of Applicability of a Linear Regression Model. (Under the 
direction of William H. Swallow.) 

Tushar Kanti Ghosh, Fiber and Polymer Science 

Habra, India 

Dissertation: Computational Model for the Bending Behavior of Plain 

Woven Fabrics. (Under the direction of Roger L. Barker and Subhash K. 

Batra.) 

Nancy Catherine Giles, Physics 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Optical Properties of Novel II-VI Semiconductor Films and 

Quantum Well Structures. (Under the direction of Jan F. Schetzina.) 

Tom C. Granato, Soil Science 

Chicago, Illinois 

Dissertation: Effects of Exogenous Nitrate and Processes That Produce 

Proliferation of Corn Roots. (Under the direction of Charles D. Raper.) 

Stewart M. Gray, Plant Pathology 

East Longmeadow, Massachusetts 

Dissertation: Resistance in Cucumis melo to Watermelon Mosaic Virus 2: 

The Effect on the Epidemiology and Pathogenesis of the Virus. (Under the 

direction of James W. Moyer and George G. Kennedy.) 



105 



Delores Miller Hayes, Sociology 

Fayetteville, North Carolina 

Dissertation: An Ecological Model for the Study of Social Mobility of 

Population Segments. (Under the direction of A. Clarke Davis.) 

Rhonda Dayle Helms, Psychology 
Monroe, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Relations of Intelligence, Cognitive Level and Social 
Perspective Taking: A Developmental Stage Analysis of Juvenile Delin- 
quency. (Under the direction of Samuel S. Snyder.) 

Marty Ray Jacobson, Microbiology 

Viroqua, Wisconsin 

Dissertation: Transcriptional Regulation of Nitrogen Fixation in Azoto- 

bacter vinelandii by Molybdenum. (Under the direction of Paul E. Bishop.) 

Roy Donald Jaquette, Nutrition 

Elkton, Maryland 

Dissertation: Effects of Dietary Protein Level on Milk Fat Depression in 

Dairy Cattle during Early Lactation. (Under the direction of Allen H. 

Rakes.) 

Chwen-Jye Ju, Electrical Engineering 

Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: Block Realization of Multidimensional Recursive Digital 

Filters. (Under the direction of Winser E. Alexander.) 

Soojoon Kang, Mechanical Engineering 

Seoul, Korea 

Dissertation: Variational Modal Identification of Self-adjoint Distributed- 

parameter Systems. (Under the direction of Larry M. Silverberg and 

Richard F. Keltic) 

William Charles Kauffman, Entomology 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

Dissertation: Influence of 2-Tridecanone-based Resistance of a Wild 

Tomato on Parasitoids and Predators of the Tomato Fruitworm, Heliothis 

zea (Boddie). (Under the direction of George G. Kennedy.) 

Myung-Sun Kim, Materials Science and Engineering 

Seoul, Korea 

Dissertation: The Structure and Properties of Nb-Ge and Nb-Sn Alloys 

Synthesized by Mechanical Alloying. (Under the direction of Carl C. Koch.) 

Philip Museve Kutima, Food Science 
Kabras, Kakamega, Kenya 

Dissertation: Characterization of the Spore Coat Involved in the Germina- 
tion of Bacillus cereus T Spores. (Under the direction of Peggy M. 
Foegeding.) 

June Taeg Lim, Biomathematics 

Seoul, Korea 

Dissertation: A Dynamic Growth Model of Vegetative Soybean Plants 

under Variations of Root Temperature and Nitrogen Concentration in 

Nutrient Solution. (Under the direction of Harvey J. Gold and Gail G. 

Wilkerson.) 



106 



Ibere Delmar Gondim Lins, Soil Science 

Campo Grande, M.S., Brazil 

Dissertation: Improvement of Soil Text Interpretations for Phosphorus 

and Zinc. (Under the direction of Fred R. Cox.) 

Mushtaq Ahmad Mian, Nutrition 

Ziarat Kaka Sahib, Pakistan 

Dissertation: Nutritional Evaluation of Soybean Meal Varying in Urease 

and Trypsin Inhibitor Activity. (Under the direction of Jim D. Garlich.) 

Mark Harrison Morton, Aerospace Engineering 

Albemarle, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Natural Control of Flexible Space Structures. (Under the 

direction of Larry M. Silverberg and Richard F. Keltic) 

Magdi Sami Moustafa, Operations Research 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Optimal Scheduling in Networks of Queues. (Under the 

direction of Shaler Stidham, Jr.) 

Michael David Mullen, Soil Science 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 

Dissertation: Effects of Phosphorus Nutrition on the Glycine max-Brady- 

rhizobium japonicum. (Under the direction of Arthur G. Wollum.) 

Raif Oruc Onvural, Operations Research 

Ankara, Turkey 

Dissertation: Closed Queueing Networks with Finite Buffers. (Under the 

direction of Harry G. Perros.) 

Mark Edwin Oxley, Applied Mathematics 

Harrison, Ohio 

Dissertation: Moving Boundaries in Reaction-Diffusion Systems with 

Absorption. (Under the direction of Robert H. Martin, Jr.) 

Edna Cachola Pableo, Plant Pathology 

Kabacan, North Cotabato, Philippines 

Dissertation: DNA Characterization and Relationship of the Genomes of 

Some Meloidogyne Species. (Under the direction of Anastasios C. Trian- 

taphyllou.) 

John Edward Parsons, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 
Salisbury, Maryland 

Dissertation: Development and Application of a Three-dimensional Water 
Management Model for Drainage Districts. (Under the direction of R. 
Wayne Skaggs.) 

Charlotte Longacre Phillips, Biochemistry 
Orlando, Florida 

Dissertation: The Regulation of Beta Follicle Stimulating Hormone Sub- 
unit RNA by 17-Beta Estradiol, Progesterone and Inhibin in Ovine Pitui- 
tary Cells in Culture. (Under the direction of William L. Miller.) 

Joanne Rebbeck, Botany 

Trenton, New Jersey 

Dissertation: The Effects of Ozone and Soil Moisture on the Growth and 

Energy Reserves of Ladino Clover and Tall Fescue. (Under the direction of 

Udo Blum.) 



107 



Nancy Suzanne Robbins, Horticultural Science 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Influences of Environmental Factors on Carbohydrate 

Metabolism in Cucumber. (Under the direction of D. Mason Pharr.) 

Clara Lee Schreiner, Biochemistry 

Lancaster, New York 

Dissertation: Metabolism of 2-Hydroxy-4-methylthiobutanoic Acid (the 

Methionine Hydroxy Analogue) by Cultured Porcine Kidney Fibroblasts. 

(Under the direction of Evan E. Jones.) 

Vincent Hugh Smith, Economics 
Croydon, England 

Dissertation: An Econometric Model of Maintenance, Utilization, Scrap- 
ping and Capital Use in the U. S. Electric Power Industry: Implications for 
the Consequences of Air Quality Regulation. (Under the direction of Dun- 
can M. Holthausen, Jr. and Raymond B. Palmquist.) 

Larry David Stephenson, Materials Science and Engineering 
Champaign, Illinois 

Dissertation: An Investigation of Microstructures in Aluminum Im- 
planted with Molybdenum Ions. (Under the direction of Ray B. Benson, Jr.) 

Eddie Stuart Tessnear, Psychology 

Wilson, North Carolina 

Dissertation: A Self-instructional Training Strategy for Remediation of 

Cognitive Impulsivity in Hearing Impaired Children. (Under the direction 

of Rachel F. Rawls and N. William Walker.) 

Mariann Weiler Tillery, Psychology 
High Point, North Carolina 

Dissertation: School Psychological Consultation: Effects on Parents dur- 
ing Intervention. (Under the direction of N. William Walker.) 

Juan Luis Torres, Biochemistry and Toxicology 

Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Dissertation: Physical and Chemical Characterization of Horse Serum 

Carboxylesterase. (Under the direction of H. Robert Horton and Frank E. 

Guthrie.) 

Antonio Amilcar Ubiera, Soil Science 
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic 

Dissertation: The Occurrence and Properties of Hydroxy-interlayered Sil- 
icate Clavs in Some Soil of the Dominican Republic. (Under the direction of 
Sterling B. Weed.) 

John Stephen Usher, Industrial Engineering 
Louisville, Kentucky 

Dissertation: Estimating Component Reliabilities from Incomplete Accel- 
erated Life Test Data. (Under the direction of Thorn J. Hodgson.) 

David Eugene Van den Bout, Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Pinehurst, North Carolina 

Dissertation: A Digital Signal Processor and Programming System for 
Parallel Signal Processing. (Under the direction of J. Benjamin O'Neal, Jr. 
and Thomas K. Miller III.) 



108 



James Matthew Vose, Forestry 
Aurora, Illinois 

Dissertation: Effects of Increased Nutrient Supply on Loblolly Pine Stand 
Leaf Area, Stemwood Growth and Crown Architecture. (Under the direc- 
tion of Arthur W. Cooper and H. Lee Allen.) 

Susan Elaine Wells, Genetics and Microbiology 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Characterization of Tetracycline Resistance Plasmids in 

Staphylococci. (Under the direction of Wesley E. Kloos.) 

Marsha Hurst Winston, Wood and Paper Science 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Characterization of the Lignin Residue from Hydrolysis of 

Sweetgum Wood with Superconcentrated Hydrochloric Acid. (Under the 

direction of Irving S. Goldstein.) 

Lisa Ann Wisniewski, Forestry 

Chicago, Illinois 

Dissertation: The Effect of Cytokinins and Root System Parameter on the 

Maturation of Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda L.). (Under the direction of Henry 

V. Amerson and Steven E. McKeand.) 

Horng-Tsann Yang, Mechanical Engineering 

Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: Three-dimensional Flow Fields Past Reentry Vehicles. 

(Under the direction of Hassan A. Hassan.) 



109 



Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 



Degrees Conferred December 15, 1987 

Dulasiri Dayananda Amarasiriwardena, Chemistry 
Galle, Sri Lanka 

Dissertation: Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Iron Oxides and 
Oxyhydroxides by Mossbauer Spectroscopy. (Under the direction of Law- 
rence H. Bowen.) 

Susan Arrendell, Crop Science 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Breeding for Increased Nitrogen Fixation in Peanut {Ara- 

chis hypogaea L.). (Under the direction of Johnny C. Wynne.) 

Gary Lewis Benzon, Entomology 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Oviposition Attraction and Stimulation in Aedes aegypti (L.) 
and in a Predator of Mosquito Larvae, Toxorhynckites splendes (Wiede- 
mann). (Under the direction of Charles A. Apperson and George G. 
Kennedy.) 

Bharat Laxmidas Bhuva, Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Rajkot, India 

Dissertation: The Simulation of Worst-case Operating Conditions for Inte- 
grated Circuits Operating in a Total Dose Environment. (Under the direc- 
tion of Sherra E. Kerns.) 

Mary Pat Bonner, Chemistry 

Hazleton, Pennsylvania 

Dissertation: Intermolecular Cyclization Reactions of Optically Active 

Epoxides. (Under the direction of Samuel G. Levine.) 

Christopher Scott Brown, Botany 

Columbia, Missouri 

Dissertation: The Control of Reserve Mobilization and Photosynthesis in 

Cotyledons of Soybean (Glycine max L. [merr]). (Under the direction of 

Steven C. Huber.) 

John Michael Brown, Horticultural Science 

Clark's Summit, Pennsylvania 

Dissertation: Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of 

Water Distribution in Plants and Solids. (Under the direction of Eric 

Young.) 

Hyo Ihl Chang, Food Science 

Seoul, Korea 

Dissertation: Protein Digestibility of Alkali- and Fructose-treated Protein 

by Rat Assay and by an Immobilized Digestive Enzyme Assay (IDEA) 

System. (Under the direction of George L. Catignani.) 

Jyhyeong Chang, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: Stability Analysis and Stabilization of Multidimensional 

Digital Recursive Filters with Applications to Adaptive Image Coding. 

(Under the direction of Winser E. Alexander.) 



110 



Ping-Chu Chu, Biomathematics 

Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: Modeling Water Balance in Larval Mexican Bean Beetles, 

Epilachna varivestis Mulsant. (Under the direction of Ronald E. Stinner.) 

Thomas Charles Corbin, Crop Science 

Nashville, Tennessee 

Dissertation: Evaluation of a Doubled Haploid Breeding Procedure for 

Simultaneous Recurrent Selection and Inbred Line Development. (Under 

the direction of Earl A. Wernsman.) 

Paulo Roberto Rio da Cunha, Industrial Engineering 

Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil 

Dissertation: An Interactive CompromisingMethod for Policy Selection in 

Multipurpose Reservoir Management Problems. (Under the direction of 

Thorn J. Hodgson and William S. Caller.) 

Deborah Lynn Cutter, Microbiology 

Norfolk, Virginia 

Dissertation: Antibiotic Resistance Plamids of Bordetella avium. (Under 

the direction of Geraldine H. Luginbuhl.) 

Karen Ann Dassel, Statistics 

Evansville, Indiana 

Dissertation: Experimental Design for the Weibull Function as a Dose 

Response Model. (Under the direction of John 0. Rawlings.) 

Ralph Earl Dewey, Crop Science 

Logan, Utah 

Dissertation: Expression of Chimeric Mitochondrial Genes Associated 

with Cytoplasmic Male Sterility in Maize. (Under the direction of David H. 

Timothy.) 

Joseph George Doolan, Fiber and Polymer Science 

Trenton, New Jesery 

Dissertation: A Study of the Molecular Motions in Poly(ethylene tereph- 

thalate) Films by the Electron Spin Resonance Spin Probe Technique. 

(Under the direction of Ralph McGregor and Richard D. Gilbert.) 

John Adam Edmond, Materials Science and Engineering 

Cohocton, New York 

Dissertation: Ion Implantation, Annealing and Simple Device Fabrication 

in Monocrystalline Beta-Silicon Carbide Thin Films. (Under the direction 

of Robert F. Davis.) 

Mohamed Kamal El Ghor, Materials Science and Engineering 

Cairo, Egypt 

Dissertation: Characterization and Optimization of Structural Defects in 

Buried Oxide Materials Formed by High Dose Oxygen Implantation in 

Silicon. (Under the direction of Jagdish Narayan.) 

Yeh-Chin Fey, Mechanical Engineering 

Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: Analytical Studies of the Vacuum-sublimation in the Frozen 

Porous Media. (Under the direction of Michael A. Boles and Mehmet N. 

Ozisik.) 



Ill 



Donita Lynn Frazier, Veterinary Medical Sciences 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Gentamicin Nephrotoxicity in Subclinical Renal Disease. 

(Under the direction of Jim E. Riviere.) 

Mohammed Awad Gabr, Civil Engineering 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Load-deflection Analysis of Laterally Loaded Piers. (Under 

the direction of Roy H. Borden and Harvey E. Wahls.) 

Marian Brinkley Gardner, Genetics 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Dissertation: The Effects of Selection for Grain Yield and Ear Number on 

Nitrogen Use Efficiency and Prolificacy in Maize. (Under the direction of 

Robert H. Moll.) 

Earl Brent Godshalk, Crop Science 

Blooming Glen, Pennsylvania 

Dissertation: Evaluation of Heritability of Cell Wall Carbohydrates, Index 

Selection and Multivariate Analysis for Switchgrass Improvement. 

(Under the direction of David H. Timothy.) 

Daniel Thomas Grimm, Microbiology 
Memphis, Tennessee 

Dissertation: Influence of Bradyrhizobium sp. on Nodule and Seed Compo- 
sition in Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). (Under the direction of Gerald H. 
Elkan.) 

Salih Abdul Hakeen, Economics 
Goldsboro, North Carolina 

Dissertation: A Dynamic Supply Model of the United States Broiler Indus- 
try. (Under the direction of Walter N. Thurman and Gerald A. Carlson.) 

Karl Andrew Harris, Physics 
Cary, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Growth of Mercury-based Films and Quantum Well Struc- 
tures by Molecular Beam Epitaxy. (Under the direction of Jan F. Schetzina 
and James W. Cook, Jr.) 

Kitty Brown Herrin, Sociology 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Dissertation: Effects of Economic and Technological Development on 
Structural Inequalities for Females: An Examination of Education, Occu- 
pation and Income in North Carolina, 1970 and 1980. (Under the direction 
of Robert L. Moxley.) 

Ann Barbara Herriott, Horticultural Science 

Morristown, New Jersey 

Dissertation: The Heritability of Resistance to Early Blight Disease in 

Tetraploid X Diploid Crosses of Potatoes. (Under the direction of Frank L. 

Haynes.) 

Sherief Abdelmoneim Hussein, Nuclear Engineering 

Alexandria, Egypt 

Dissertation: Crystallographic Texture and Mechanical Anisotropy of 

Zircaloys. (Under the direction of K. Linga Murty.) 



112 



Muhammad Nadeem Iqbal, Nuclear Engineering 

Karachi, Pakistan 

Dissertation: Radiosotope Tracer Methods for the Dynamic Measurement 

of the In-process Inventory of Dissolved Materials. (Under the direction of 

Robin P. Gardner.) 

William Steed Irby, Entomology 
Lexington, Virginia 

Dissertation: Hosts and Resting Distribution of Female Mosquitoes in the 
Coastal Plain of North Carolina and Immunoblot Analysis of Blood Diges- 
tion by Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). (Under the direction of Charles 
S. Apperson and Wayne M. Brooks.) 

Rahmad Binit Ismail, Economics 

Trengganu, Malaysia 

Dissertation: The Effect of Human Capital on Earnings Differentials in 

Malaysia. (Under the direction of Steven G. Allen and Daniel S. Sumner.) 

Idris Bin Jajri, Economics 

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 

Dissertation: The Impact of Petroleum Prices on the Natural Rubber 

Industry. (Under the direction of Michael K. Wohlgenant.) 

Changjian Jiang, Statistics 
Yangzhou, People's Republic of China 

Dissertation: Estimation of F-statistics in Subdivided Genetic Popula- 
tions. (Under the direction of C. Clark Cockerham.) 

Rolf Dieter Joerger, Microbiology 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Characterization of Tn5-induced Nif~ Mutants of Azotobacter 

vinelandii and Determination of the Sequence of the nifB-nifQ Genomic 

Region. (Under the direction of Paul E. Bishop.) 

Melissa Gail Jones, Science Education 

Cary, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Gender Differences in Student-Teacher Interactions in 

Physical Science and Chemistry Classes. (Under the direction of Jack H. 

Wheatley and John F. Roberts.) 

Bradford Maurice Kard, Entomology 

San Rafael, California 

Dissertation: Seasonal History, Effects and Control of White Grubs 

(Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in a Fraser Fir Christmas Tree Plantation in 

the Southern Appalachians. (Under the direction of Fred P. Hain.) 

Tsukuru Katsuyama, Electrical Engineering 

Kawasaki, Japan 

Dissertation: Growth, Characterization and Device Applications of 

Strained Layer Superlattices. (Under the direction of Salah M. Bedair.) 

Mohammad Ali Khatibzadeh, Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Large-signal Modeling of Gallium Arsenide Field-effect 
Transistors. (Under the direction of Robert J. Trew and Nino A. Masnari.) 



113 



William Albert Kiele, Mathematics 

Stuart, Florida 

Dissertation: The Classification Problem of Finite Rings by Computable 

Means. (Under the direction of Kwangil Koh.) 

Byung Yong Kim, Food Science 

Seoul, Korea 

Dissertation: Rheological Investigation of Gel Structure Formation by 

Fish Proteins during Setting and Heat Processing. (Under the direction of 

Donald D. Hamann.) 

Sunil Shrinkrishna Kulkarni, Mechanical Engineering 
Pune, Maharashtra, India 

Dissertation: Automatic Feedback Control of Rigid Body for Finite Dis- 
placements. (Under the direction of Clarence J. Maday.) 

Jay Edgar Lane, Materials Science and Engineering 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Dissertation: Kinetics and Mechanisms of Primary and Steady-state 

Creep in Sintered Alpha Silicon Carbide. (Under the direction of Robert F. 

Davis.) 

Ambrish Lavania, Mechanical Engineering 

Varanasi, U.P., India 

Dissertation: Condensation of a Vapor Bubble in an Immiscible Liquid. 

(Under the direction of Richard R. Johnson.) 

Gil Sik Lee, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Taegu, Korea 

Dissertation: Electrical Properties and Materials Growth of Strained 

Layer Heterostructures. (Under the direction of Robert M. Kolbas.) 

Ja-Song Leu, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Yun-Lin, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: Strategies for Retargeting of Existing Sequential Programs 

for Parallel Processing. (Under the direction of Dharma P. Agrawal.) 

Jen-Hsiang Lin, Economics 

Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: Retirement Decisions and Food Expenditure Patterns for 

Older Households in United States. (Under the direction of Ronald A. 

Schrimper.) 

Kuanlian Liou, Industrial Engineering 
Puli, Nantou, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: Path Generation for Welding Robot: An Application of Geo- 
metric Modeling System. (Under the direction of Thorn J. Hodgson and 
Han Bao.) 

Jiann Liu, Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: A Study of Techniques Which Can Be Used in the Fabrica- 
tion of Submicron MOSFET Devices. (Under the direction of Jimmie J. 
Wortman.) 



114 



Kate King-Yu Luk, Chemistry 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Vaporized Analyte Introduction into a Low-power Plasma 

for Atomic Emission Spectrometry. (Under the direction of Charles B. 

Boss.) 

Lloyd Wilson Massengill, Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Simulation of Pulsed-ionizing Radiation-induced Errors 
in CMOS Memory Circuits. (Under the direction of Sarah E. Kerns.) 

Alexander David McDonald, Economics 
Adelaide, S.A., Australia 

Dissertation: An Empirical Model of the Economics of Resource Extrac- 
tion with Output Price and Reserve Level Stochastic. (Under the direction 
of Edward W. Erickson and Thomas Johnson.) 

Joseph McGuire, Chemical Engineering 

Wilmington, Delaware 

Dissertation: The Influence of Solid Surface Energetics on Macromolecu- 

lar Adsorption from Milk. (Under the direction of David E. Guinnup and 

Kenneth R. Swartzel.) 

Tony L. Mitchell, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Lumberton, North Carolina 

Dissertation: A Fault Tolerant Self-routing Computer Network Topology. 

(Under the direction of Arne A. Nilsson and Wushow Chou.) 

Manjoo Mittal, Psychology 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: An Experimental Evaluation of Community/Industry 

Growth Strategies. (Under the direction of Frank J. Smith.) 

Harold George Monbouquette, Chemical Engineering 

Norwood, Massachusetts 

Dissertation: Kinetics of Immobilized Cells. (Under the direction of David 

F. Ollis.) 

Mary Lynn Moser, Zoology 

Decatur, Illinois 

Dissertation: Effects of Salinity Fluctuations on Juvenile Estuarine Fish. 

(Under the direction of John M. Miller.) 

Larry Eugene Mosley, Physics 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Phenomena Involving Reversible Metastable Configurations 

and Defects in Amorphous Silicon. (Under the direction of Michael A. 

Paesler.) 

Jane Mt. Pleasant, Soil Science 
Syracuse, New York 

Dissertation: Weed Control Measures for Short-cycle Food Crops under 
Humid-Tropical Environments in Developing Countries. (Under the direc- 
tion of Robert E. McCollum.) 

Abdelfatah Abdelmutti Mohammed, Operations Research 

Madani, Sudan 

Dissertation: Information Theory and Queueing Theory via Generalized 

Geometric Programming. (Under the direction of Elmor L. Peterson.) 

115 



Eduardo Manuel Munoz-Morales, Mathematics 
Antofagasta, Chile 

Dissertation: Bifurcation Analysis of a Coevolutionary Model with Inter- 
specific Competition. (Under the direction of James F. Selgrade.) 

Christine Ann Nalepa, Entomology 

Detroit, Michigan 

Dissertation: Life History Studies of the Woodroach Cryptocercus punc- 

tualatus Scudder (Dictyoptera:Cryptocercidae) and Their Implications for 

the Evolution of Termite Eusociality. (Under the direction of John T. 

Ambrose and Fred Gould.) 

Ahmed-Naguib Hassan Nassar, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 
Cairo, Egypt 

Dissertation: Solar Energy Utilization and Microcomputer Control in the 
Greenhouse Bulk Curing and Drying Solar System. (Under the direction 
of Barney K. Huang.) 

Thomas Patrick Oscar, Animal Science 
Wilmington, Delaware 

Dissertation: Role of Nickel in Ruminal Fermentation. (Under the direc- 
tion of Jerry W. Spears.) 

Bonnie Hope Ownley, Plant Pathology 

Elizabeth City, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Physical and Biological Approaches to Control of Phytoph- 

thora Root Rot of Container Grown Ornamentals. (Under the direction of 

David M. Benson.) 

Ching-Tsuan Pan, Applied Mathematics 
Shanghai, People's Republic of China 

Dissertation: Hyperbolic Rotations for Downdating the Cholesky Factori- 
zation with Application to Signal Processing. (Under the direction of 
Robert J. Plemmons.) 

Jan Elizabeth Pegram, Fiber and Polymer Science 
Spindale, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Dye Diffusion in Solvent-treated Polyester. (Under the direc- 
tion of David M. Cates.) 

Hong Peng, Mechanical Engineering 
Shanghai, People's Republic of China 

Dissertation: Acoustic Radiation from Plates Driven by Multi-point Ran- 
dom Forces. (Under the direction of Richard F. Keltic) 

Zongmyung Rhee, Electrical and Computing Engineering 

Seoul, Korea 

Dissertation: Finite Precision Arithmetic Effects for Fixed and Adaptive 

Lattice Filters. (Under the direction of S. Thomas Alexander and H. Joel 

Trussell.) 

Billy Warren Roberts, Soil Science 

Marshall, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Plant Growth and Soil Microorganism Responses to SO2, 

NO2 and Ozone as Affected by Soils. (Under the direction of Arthur G. 

Wollum II.) 



116 



George Brett Runion, Plant Pathology 

Washington, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Epidemiology and Control of Pitch Canker of Southern 

Pines. (Under the direction of Robert I. Bruck.) 

Farid Sadeghi, Food Science 
Tehran, Iran 

Dissertation: Kinetic Studies of Calibration Materials for Thermal Eval- 
uation of Food Systems. (Under the direction of Kenneth R. Swartzel.) 

Michele Meyer Schoeneberger, Forestry 

Saint Louis, Missouri 

Dissertation: The Mycorrhizal Fungus-Rhizobium-Leguminous Plant 

Symbiosis in Lotus pendunculatus Cav. and Trifolium subterraneum L. 

(Under the direction of Charles B. Davey.) 

Sally Hamilton Spetz, Psychology 

Meadville, Pennsylvania 

Dissertation: Work-related Interests and Their Relationships to Career 

Choice, Satisfaction and Decisiveness. (Under the direction of Joseph W. 

Cunningham.) 

Lawrence Thomas Szott, Soil Science 

Chicago, Illinois 

Dissertation: Improving the Productivity of Shifting Agriculture in the 

Amazon Basin of Peru through the Use of Leguminous Vegetation. (Under 

the direction of Charles B. Davey.) 

Douglas Waters VanOsdell, Chemical Engineering 

Apex, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Flow Resistance of Filter Dust Deposits Formed under the 

Influence of a Surface Electric Field. (Under the direction of Richard M. 

Felder.) 

Kilmer Von Chong, Plant Pathology 
Anton, Panama 

Dissertation: Epidemiology of Alfalfa Leafspot Diseases: Pathogen Occur- 
rence and the Relationship among Environmental Factors, Inoculum Den- 
sity and Disease Progress. (Under the direction of C. Lee Campbell and 
Eddie Echandi.) 

Sharon May Wallsten, Psychology 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Interactive Factors in Stress: Differences between Caregiv- 
ers' and Noncaregivers' Perception of Stress in Daily Experiences. (Under 
the direction of Samuel S. Snyder.) 

Philip Terrell Weinbrecht, Biochemistry and Physiology 

Elberton, Georgia 

Dissertation: The Application of Light Reflectance Studies of Red Blood 

Cell Number to Cerebral Microvascular Responses to Hypoxia. (Under the 

direction of Ian S. Longmuir and J. Paul Thaxton.) 

John Charles Welker, Economics and Forestry 

Jacksonville, Florida 

Dissertation: Application of a Dynamic Investment Scheduling Model to 

Import Substitution of Softwood Lumber in Jamaica. (Under the direction 

of Jan G. Laarman and Duncan M. Holthausen, Jr.) 



117 



Robert Reid Whiteside, Jr., Psychology 
Spartanburg, South Carolina 

Dissertation: Development and Validation of an Illustrated Multiple- 
choice Test of Social Skills Knowledge of Adolescents. (Under the direction 
of Rachel F. Rawls and William P. Erchul.) 

Yong-Sun Wie, Aerospace Engineering 
Seoul, Korea 

Dissertation: Numerical Investigation of Three-dimensional Flow Sepa- 
ration. (Under the direction of Fred R. DeJarnette.) 

Carol Ann Wilkinson, Crop Science 

Fitchburg, Massachusetts 

Dissertation: Studies on Septoria nodorum Causal Agent of Glume Blotch 

of Wheat. (Under the direction of Donald A. Emery and J. Paul Murphy.) 

Chen-Yui Yang, Physics 

Panchaio, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: An X-ray Study of Amorphous Arsenic and Arsenic Chal- 

cogenide Semiconductors. (Under the direction of Dale E. Sayers.) 

Sung-Kyun Zee, Nuclear Engineering 

Seoul, Korea 

Dissertation: Numerical Algorithms for Parallel Processors Computer 

Architectures with Applications to the Few-group Neutron Diffusion 

Equations. (Under the direction of Paul J. Turinsky.) 

Ronald Craig Zumstein, Chemical Engineering 

Knoxville, Tennessee 

Dissertation: 1. Modeling, Determination and Measurement of Growth 

Rate Dispersion in Crystallization. 2. The Crystallization of L-Isoleucine in 

Aqueous Solutions. (Under the direction of Ronald W. Rousseau.) 



Degrees Conferred May 7, 1988 

Wan Omar Abdullah, Veterinary Medical Sciences 

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 

Dissertation: Immune Complexed and Free Forms of Antigens in the Sera 

of B. pahangi Infected Dogs and Characterization of Excretory-Secretory 

Antigens in Filarial Infection. (Under the direction of Eduard V. DeBuys- 

scher and Bruce Hammerberg.) 

Jon Alan Arnold, Civil Engineering 

Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania 

Dissertation: Rotary Distributors: A Field Study and Ground Water Flow 

Model. (Under the direction of William S. Galler.) 

Owusu Atiba Bandele, Horticultural Science 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Dissertation: Plant Density, N Fertilizer and Previous Crop Effects within 

Several Sequential Vegetable Cropping Systems. (Under the direction of 

Conrad H. Miller and Douglas C. Sanders.) 



118 



William Mark Barbour, Microbiology 

Collinsville, Virginia 

Dissertation: Effects of Plasmid Curing and a Plasmid Copy-number 

Mutant on Symbiotic and Physiological Properties of Rhizobium fredii 

USDA 206. (Under the direction of Gerald H. Elkan.) 

Michael John Beggs, Biochemistry 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Dissertation: Action of Gonadotrophin-releasing Hormone in Cultured 

Ovine Pituitary Cells Is Separate from Protein Kinase C Activation and Is 

Potentiated by Purified Inhibin. (Under the direction of William L. Miller.) 

Barry Hamilton Beith, Psychology 
Fullerton, California 

Dissertation: A Study Investigating the Subjective Workload of Individu- 
als and Teams of a Cognitive Task. (Under the direction of Richard G. 
Pearson.) 

Thomas Gary Bifano, Mechanical Engineering 

Brookline, Massachusetts 

Dissertation: Ductile-Regime Grinding of Brittle Materials. (Under the 

direction of Thomas D. Dow.) 

Fitzgerald Lewis Booker, Botany 

Dayton, Ohio 

Dissertation: Physiological Responses of Spartina alterniflora Loisel. and 

Limonium carolinianum (Walt.) Britt. to Weathered Fuel Oil. (Under the 

direction of Ernest D. Seneca.) 

Philip Allen Brown, Chemistry 

East Islip, New York 

Dissertation: The Regioselective Synthesis of Terminal Ring Disubsti- 

tuted Benz[f]indenes and s-Hydrindacenes. (Under the direction of Samuel 

G. Levine.) 

Michael Paul Carver, Toxicology 
Richmond, Indiana 

Dissertation: Development of the Isolated Perfused Porcine Skin Flap for 
In vitro Studies of Percutaneous Absorption Pharmacokinetics and Cu- 
taneous Biotransformation. (Under the direction of Frank E. Guthrie and 
Jim E. Riviere.) 

Servio Alves Cassini, Microbiology 
Belo Horizonte, M.G., Brazil 

Dissertation: Variation in Symbiotic Effectiveness of Bradyrhizobium sp. 
through Plant Passage in Peanut {Arachis hypogaea L.). (Under the direc- 
tion of Gerald H. Elkan.) 

Dureseti Chidambarrao, Civil Engineering 
Visakhapatnam, India 

Dissertation: Comparative Analyses and Assessment of Different Harden- 
ing Rules in Channel Die Compression of F.C.C. Crystals. (Under the 
direction of Kerry S. Havner.) 



119 



Robert Dennis Ciskowski, Mechanical Engineering 

Chicago, Illinois 

Dissertation: Boundary Element Solution for a Coupled Elastodynamic 

and Wave Equation System to Predict Forced Response of a Plugged 

Acoustic Cavity. (Under the direction of Larry H. Royster.) 

Patricia Walton Collins, Psychology 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: An Information Processing Investigation of Individual Stra- 
tegy Differences on a Spatial Visualization Task. (Under the direction of 
Patricia F. Horan.) 

James Andrew Cooke, Mechanical Engineering 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Determination of the Impulse Response of a Viscoelastic 
Bean Using a Fractional Derivative Constitutive Model. (Under the direc- 
tion of Richard F. Keltie.) 

James Burr Cunningham, Psychology 
Sacramento, California 

Dissertation: Performance of a Visual Search Task as a Function of Direc- 
tional Noise Stress and Target Location. (Under the direction of Richard G. 
Pearson.) 

William Layne Daugherty, Nuclear Engineering 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Biaxial Creep of Zircaloy: Texture and Temperature Effects. 

(Under the direction of K. Linga Murty.) 

Gary Sherman Davis, Physiology 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Factors Influencing Plasma Corticosterone in Posthatch and 

Adolescent Turkeys. (Under the direction of Thomas D. Siopes.) 

Claudia Thompson Dickerson, Psychology 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Dissertation: The Effects of Adjunct Questions on Learning from Text 

Inconsistent with Prior Knowledge. (Under the direction of Patricia F. 

Horan and Slater E. Newman.) 

Yehia El-Badrawy El-Mogahzy, Fiber and Polymer Science 

Auburn, Alabama 

Dissertation: A Study of the Nature of Friction in Fibrous Materials. 

(Under the direction of Bhupender S. Gupta.) 

Taher Ali Fenaish, Civil Engineering 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Numerical Modeling of Wave Uprush and Induced Dune 

Erosion. (Under the direction of John S. Fisher and Margery F. Overton.) 

Catherine Ingram Fogel, Sociology 

Durham, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Health Status of Incarcerated Women. (Under the direction 

of Maxine P. Atkinson and William B. Clifford.) 

Ali Gooya, Mechanical Engineering 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Velocity Distribution and Particle Deposition in a Baboon 

Nose Cast. (Under the direction of Elsayed M. Afify.) 

120 



Karen Ann Grosser, Chemical Engineering 

Media, Pennsylvania 

Dissertation: Hydrodynamics and Lateral Thermal Dispersion in Trickle 

Bed Reactors. (Under the direction of Ruben G. Carbonell.) 

David Joseph Halchin, Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania 

Dissertation: Characterization of Thin Ferrite Films Using Microwave 
Propagation. (Under the direction of Daniel D. Stancil and Robert J. Trew.) 

Michael Lynn Hall, Nuclear Engineering 

Greensboro, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Numerical Modeling of the Transient Thermohydraulic 

Behavior of High Temperature Heat Pipes for Space Reactor Applications. 

(Under the direction of J. Michael Doster.) 

Budi Haryanto, Animal Science 

Semarang, Indonesia 

Dissertation: Fiber Utilization by Indonesian Kacang Goats Fed Mixed 

Native Grass Forage Supplemented with Zinc and Nitrogen. (Under the 

direction of William L. Johnson and Jerry W. Spears.) 

Paul Francis Hemler, Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: A Procedural Approach to View Independent Three Dimen- 
sional Object Recognition and Pose Determination. (Under the direction of 
Wesley E. Snyder.) 

Chih-Hong Ho, Mechanical Engineering 

Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: Direct and Inverse Radiation in Participating Media with 

Constant and Variable Albedo. (Under the direction of Mehmet N. Ozisik 

and F. Yates Sorrell.) 

Alexander Owens Hobbs, Civil Engineering 

Aiken, South Carolina 

Dissertation: An Investigation of the Use of Coal-fired Power Plant Ash 

Ponds for Treatment of Boiler Acid Cleaning Waste. (Under the direction 

of William S.Galler.) 

David Marshall Holland, Statistics and Forestry 

Timonium, Maryland 

Dissertation: Evaluation of a Bounded Frequency Distribution Generated 

by a Transformed Logistic Variable. (Under the direction of Thomas M. 

Gerig and William L. Hafley.) 

Dorothy Gallon Holmes, Sociology 

Fayetteville, North Carolina 

Dissertation: A Path Analytic Model of Attitudes toward Discretionary 

and Medical/Rape Abortions. (Under the direction of Maxine P. Atkinson 

and Odell Uzzell.) 

Alan Henry Huber, Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 

Millersville, Pennsylvania 

Dissertation: Distribution of Pollutant Concentrations Downwind of a 

Point-source in the Near Wake of a Building. (Under the direction of S. Pal 

Arya.) 



121 



Todd Harvey Hubing, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Modeling the Electromagnetic Radiation from Electrically 

Small Sources with Attached Wires. (Under the direction of J. Frank 

Kauffman.) 

Walid Yousef Jaber, Civil Engineering 

Jenin, Jordan 

Dissertation: Probabilistic Analyses for Wave-induced Instability of Sea 

Bed. (Under the direction of Mohammed S. Rahman and Chi C. Tung.) 

Sally Elizabeth Treharne John, Genetics and Forestry 

Victoria, British Columbia, Canada 

Dissertation: Early Genotype by Environmental Interactions and Genetic 

Variances of Douglas-fir. (Under the direction of Gene Namkoong.) 

Michael Evan Kazmierszak, Fiber and Polymer Science 

Atlantic Beach, Florida 

Dissertation: Morphological Studies of the PPDI-based Polyurethane 

Block Copolymer System. (Under the direction of David R. Buchanan and 

Raymond E. Fornes.) 

James Thomas Kroll, Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 
Warren, New Jersey 

Dissertation: An Analysis of the Error Characteristics of Atlantic Tropical 
Cyclone Track Prediction Models. (Under the direction of Jerry M. Davis 
and Mark DeMaria.) 

Georgia Stallings Lawrence, Mathematics Education 
Hertford, North Carolina 

Dissertation: An Analysis of the Algebraic Competencies and Other Char- 
acteristics Which Affect Success in Developmental Mathematics Courses 
on the College Level. (Under the direction of Lawrence M. Clark and 
William M. Waters, Jr.) 

Susan Carter Laws, Biochemistry 

Rose Hill, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Regulation of GnRH Receptors by Progesterone and Inhibin 

in Ovine Pituitary Cell Culture. (Under the direction of William L. Miller.) 

Pee- Yew Lee, Materials Science and Engineering 
Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: The Amorphization of Nickel-Niobium and Nickel-Zir- 
conium Alloys by Mechanical Alloying. (Under the direction of Charles C. 
Koch.) 

Yun-Cheng Liu, Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Performance Modeling of Distributed and Parallel Process- 
ing Systems. (Under the direction of Arne A. Nilsson and Harry G. Perros.) 

David Langdon Loftis, Forestry 
Brevard, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Regenerating Red Oak in the Southern Appalachians: Pre- 
dictive Models and Practical Applications. (Under the direction of Arthur 
W. Cooper.) 



122 



Jean-Marie Luginbuhl, Nutrition 

Neuchatel, Switzerland 

Dissertation: The Effect of Hay Intake on Chewing Behavior, Transit of 

Digesta and Particle Size Breakdown in Cattle. (Under the direction of 

Joseph C. Burns and Kevin R. Pond.) 

Robert Ping-Chung Ma, Chemical Engineering 

Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: Modeling a Fluidized Bed Coal Gasification Reactor. (Under 

the direction of Richard M. Felder.) 

Taryn Smith Moody, Industrial Engineering 
Severna Park, Maryland 

Dissertation: The Effects of Restricted Vocabulary Size on Voice Interac- 
tive Discourse Structure. (Under the direction of Thomas J. Hodgson, 
Michael G. Joost and Robert D. Rodman.) 

David Mark Naylor, Chemical Engineering 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: A Study of the Radiation-induced Polymerization of Vinyl 

Ethers and Ring-opening Polymerization of Cyclic Siloxanes. (Under the 

direction of Vivian T. Stannett.) 

Russell Steven Nelson, Zoology 
Tallahassee, Florida 

Dissertation: A Study of the Life History, Ecology and Population Dynam- 
ics of Four Sympatric Reef Predators (Rhomboplites aurorubens, Lutjanus 
campechanus, Lutjanidae; Haemulon melanurum, Haemulidae; and 
Pagrus pagrus, Sparidae on the East and West Flower Garden Banks, 
Northwestern Gulf of Mexico. (Under the direction of William W. Hassler 
and Charles S. Manooch III.) 

James Irvin Northrup, Applied Mathematics 

Chapel Hill, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Pointwise Quasi-Newton Methods and Integral Equations. 

(Under the direction of Carl T. Kelley.) 

Mehmet Cevdet Ozturk, Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Ankara, Turkey 

Dissertation: Formulation of Shallow Junctions for VLSI by Ion Implanta- 
tion and Rapid Thermal Annealing. (Under the direction of Jimmie J. 
Wortman.) 

John William Palmour, Materials Science and Engineering 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Characterization of Oxidation, Dry Etching and Device Per- 
formance of Monocrystalline Beta-Silicon Carbide Thin Films. (Under the 
direction of Robert F. Davis.) 

Jong Shin Park, Fiber and Polymer Science 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Experimental and Theoretical Studies on the Interlaminar 

Shear Strength of Graphite Fiber/Epoxy Composites Exposed to Ionizing 

Radiation. (Under the direction of Raymond E. Fornes and Richard D. 

Gilbert.) 



123 



No Gill Park, Mechanical Engineering 

Pusan, Korea 

Dissertation: An Analytical Investigation of Geared System Dynamics 

Containing Spur and Helical Gears. (Under the direction of Joseph W. 

David and Richard F. Keltic) 

George Joseph Pesacreta, Zoology 
Beacon, New York 

Dissertation: Water Chemistry from North Carolina Piedmont Impound- 
ments with Hydrilla, (Hydrilla verticillata L.f. Royle). (Under the direction 
of Ronald G. Hodson and Melvin T. Huish.) 

Dale Nelson Rachmeler, Crop Science 

Huntsville, Alabama 

Dissertation: Inheritance of Early Maturity and Fatty Acid Composition 

in Peanut {Arachis hypogaea L.). (Under the direction of Johnny C. Wynne.) 

Alice Anna Wood Reese, Animal Science 

Los Angeles, California 

Dissertation: Effect of Energy Supplementation on Indonesian Sheep. 

(Under the direction of Raymond W. Harvey and William L. Johnson.) 

Jonathan Lloyd Schaeffer, Toxicology 

Smithfield, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Mycotoxins and Carotenoid Metabolism in Poultry. (Under 

the direction of Pat B. Hamilton.) 

Herbert Ernst Schellhorn, Microbiology 

Guelph, Ontario, Canada 

Dissertation: Response of Catalase- and Superoxide Dismutase-deficient 

Mutants of Escherichia coli to Oxidative Stress. (Under the direction of 

Hosni M. Hassan.) 

Joan Rivers Schiavone, Microbiology 

Columbus, Georgia 

Dissertation: The Regulation of Superoxide Dismutase Biosynthesis in 

Escherichia coli and Other Prokaryotic Systems. (Under the direction of 

Hosni M. Hassan.) 

Seyedjavad Seyedghasemipour, Operations Research 

Greenville, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Petroleum Resource Estimation in a Partially Explored 

Region with a Sequential Land Release Scheme. (Under the direction of 

Bibhuti B. Bhattacharyya and Peter Bloomfidd.) 

Jill Renee Sidebottom, Plant Pathology 

Urbana, Illinois 

Dissertation: Use of Cultural Practices to Enhance Partial-resistance in 

Peanut Cultivars to Cylindrocladium crotalariae. (Under the direction of 

Marvin K. Beute.) 

Prem Singh, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Simulation of Root Growth and Soil Moisture in a Peanut 

Growth Model. (Under the direction of James H. Young.) 



124 



Thomas John Stabel, Biochemistry 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Dissertation: Investigation of the Distribution of Sulfhydryl Oxidase in 

Mammalian Tissues and Its Relationship to Milk Proteins. (Under the 

direction of H. Robert Horton.) 

Shari Jill Stowers, Toxicology 

Rougemont, North Carolina 

Dissertation: Role of Activated Proto-oncogenes in Chemically Induced 

Rodent Tumors. (Under the direction of Ernest Hodgson.) 

Ming-Shiuan Su, Chemistry 

Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: The Electrorefinement of Group IIIA Elements through 

Metal Alkyl Complex Electrolytes. (Under the direction of Klaus J. 

Bachmann.) 

Harold Mathijs van Es, Soil Science 

Amsterdam, Netherlands 

Dissertation: Field-scale Water Relations for an Eroded Hapludult. 

(Under the direction of D. Keith Cassel.) 

Andrew Clayton Vinal, Veterinary Medical Sciences 

Cary, North Carolina 

Dissertation: The Association of Congo Red Binding and Virulence in 

Escherichia coli Pathogenic for Poultry. (Under the direction of Herman A. 

Berkhoff and Thoyd Melton.) 

Joseph Andrew White, Genetics 
Kendall Park, New Jersey 

Dissertation: Compartmentalization of the Maize Mitochondrial Super- 
oxide Dismutase. (Under the direction of John G. Scandalios.) 

Richard Scott Winder, Botany 

New Castle, Pennsylvania 

Dissertation: Evaluation, Optimization and Screening of Potential Myco- 

herbicides. (Under the direction of W. Scott Chilton and C. Gerald Van 

Dyke.) 

John Francis Witzig, Zoology 

Vienna, Virginia 

Dissertation: The Visual Assessment of Reef Fish Communities. (Under 

the direction of Gene R. Huntsman and Kenneth H. Pollock.) 

Shawn Harold Woodson, Aerospace Engineering 

China Grove, North Carolina 

Dissertation: An Interactive Three-dimensional Laminar and Turbulent 

Boundary-layer Method for Compressible Flow over Swept Wings. (Under 

the direction of Fred R. DeJarnette.) 

Kap Seung Yang, Fiber and Polymer Science 
Junlabook-Do, Korea 

Dissertation: Lyotropic Mesophases of Cellulose in the Ammonia/Ammo- 
nium Thiocyanate Solvent System. (Under the direction of John A. Cuculo 
and Michael H. Theil.) 



125 



Ying Jay Yang, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

I-Lan, Taiwan, Republic of China 

Dissertation: Quantum Well Transverse Junction Stripe Laser. (Under the 

direction of Robert M. Kolbas.) 



126 



ALUMNI DISTINGUISHED PROFESSORS 



Name 

Richard R. Braham 

Chandra D. Cox 

William T.Fike 

Donald H. Mershon 



College and Department 
College of Forest Resources 
Department of Forestry 

School of Design 
Department of Design 

College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences 
Department of Crop Science 

College of Education and 

Psychology 

Department of Psychology 



GRADUATE ALUMNI DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR 

Name College and Department 

Josef S. Gratzl College of Forest Resources 

Department of Wood and Paper Science 

OUTSTANDING TEACHER AWARDS FOR 1987-88 



Date 
1988-91 

1988-91 

1988-91 

1988-91 



Date 
1988-91 



Name 

Roger L. Barker 

Mary Frances Castro 

Kenneth L. Esbenshade 

Abdel-Aziz Fahmy 

Lola C. Hudson 

John P. Huggard 

Karen L. Johnston 

H. Joseph Kleiss 

Bryce H. Lane 

N. F. J. Matthews 

Vernon C. Matzen 

Robert P. Patterson 

Michael Pause 

Phillip S. Rea 

Norman A. Sprinthall 

William H. Swallow 

Deborah B. Wyrick 



School and Department 

Textiles 

Textile Engineering and Science 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
Foreign Languages and Literatures 

Agriculture and Life Sciences 
Animal Science 

Engineering 

Materials Science and Engineering 

Veterinary Medicine 

Anatomy, Physiology, and Radiology 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
Economics and Business 

Physical and Mathematical Sciences 
Physics 

Agriculture and Life Sciences 
Soil Science 

Agriculture and Life Sciences 
Horticultural Science 

Engineering 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Engineering 
Civil Engineering 

Agriculture and Life Sciences 
Crop Science 

Design 
Design 

Forest Resources 

Recreation Resources Administration 

Education and Psychology 
Counselor Education 

Physical and Mathematical Sciences 
Statistics 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
English 



127 



Awards for Achievement 

1987-1988 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES 

Agri-Life Council Outstanding Club Member Awards: 

Agronomy: Benjamin R. Smith, Matthews 

Animal Science: Teena Wooten, Hookerton 

Biochemistry: Michael Willits, Raleigh 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering: Science Curriculum— Daphne M. 
Cartner. Mocksville; Technology Curriculum— John M. Gann, Asheboro 

Biology: Alice L. Lewis, Raleigh 

Agricultural Economics: Vernon N. Cox, Tabor City 

Food Science: Michael N. Chesson, Raleigh 

Horticultural Science: Christopher G. Berrier, Thomasville 

Medical Technology: Samantha William, Hookerton 

National Agri-Marketing Association: Mia Bateman, Raleigh 

Pest Management: Ellen S. Blenk, Goldsboro 

Poultry Science: John D. McDanel, Hiddenite 

Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental: Jerry W. Mullis, Jr., Charlotte 

Pre- Professional Health Society: Charles D. Dickens, Greenville 

Pre-Veterinary: David W. Linzey, Raleigh 

Wildlife Biology: Jonathan E. Thompson, Lilburn, GA 

Agronomy 
Senior Highest Scholastic Average in Agronomy: Joseph C. Black, Seaview, VA 
American Society of Agronomy Award, Most Outstanding Senior: Joseph C. Black. 

Seaview, VA 
Agronomy Club Leadership Award: Joseph C. Black, Seaview, VA 

Animal Science 

Most Outstanding Club Member: William K. Lytle, Old Fort 

Most Outstanding Senior: Kevin N. McKisson, Henderson 

American Society of Animal Science Undergraduate A wards: Cynthia D. Burnett, 
Charlotte; Johnny D. Dellinger, Lincolnton; Mark G. Ladd, Rougemont; Tracy A. 
Meadows, Raleigh; Kevin N. McKisson, Henderson; Mary R. Smith, Rocky Mount; 
James E. Tuck, Jr., Graham; Jenna L. Blackwell, Matthews; Stephen H. Brenn, New 
Providence, NJ; Lisa G. Britt, Goldsboro; Fred G. Brown, Traphill; Geri S. Davidson, 
Hinsdale, HN; Kelly J. Driggins, Conway; Jaime Mullerat, Raleigh; Chesley D. 
Overby, Reidsville; Sharon K. Williams, Morrisville; David A. Dominquez, Cary; 
Brenda G. Jordan, Belhaven; Laura H. Phillips, Mocksville; Denna M. Rhein, 
Raleigh; Kristal P. Velazquez, Knightdale; Cynthia L. Warner, Raleigh; Alexandra 
M. Willie, Stedman 

Biochemistry 
Outstanding Biochemistry Student Award: Lillian H. Rinker, Burlington 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Student Honor Awards — North 
Carolina Student Engineering Branch of the American Society of Agricidtural Engi- 
neers: Randall K. Page, Elon College 

North Carolina Student Mechanization Branch of the American Society of Agricul- 
tural Engineers: Mark E. Langdon, Coats 

Botany 
Most Outstanding Student: Andrea M. Herr, Lancaster, PA 



128 



Food Science 
B. M. Newell Award: Andrea L. Twiford, Rocky Mount 
Forbes Leadership Award: Jennifer A. Faris, Chapel Hill 
Ambrosia Chocolate Top Scholar Award: Rabab A. Saadi, Amman, Jordan 
Crouch Scholastic Achievement Award: Reem S. Sidahmed, Durham 

Horticultural Science 
Outstanding Senior Horticulturist Award: Thomas B. Moss, II, Enfield 

Microbiology 
Most Outstanding Student: Laura T. Whritenour, Lumberton 

Poultry Science 

T. T. Broicn Poultry Science Club Award: Angela Conner, Cary 

Zoology 
Most Outstanding Student: Jennifer R. Wood, Raleigh 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN 

The American Institute of Architects School Medal: Dennis Edward Stallings, 
Satellite, FL 

The A merican Institute of Architects Certificate of Merit: John Lester Rose, Arling- 
ton, VA 

Alpha Rho Chi Medal: Robert Andrew Hoffman, Lumberton 

North Carolina Chapter of The American Institute of Architects Book Award: John 
Kevin Huelster, Indianapolis, IN 

Richard Green Prize for Design Achievement: Benjamin Barry Cahoon, Engelhard 

Architecture Faculty Book Award: Robert Andrew Hoffman, Lumberton 

Walter Hook Book Award: Kwan Young Chung, Seoul, Korea 

The American Society of Landscape Architects Certificate of Honor: Joel Haden 
Evans, Charlottesville, VA; Elizabeth Ballard Simons, Wilmington 

The American Society of Landscape Architects Certificate of Merit: Harold Hoyt 
Bangs, Raleigh; John David Penkacik, Orlando. FL 

North Carolina Chapter of The American Society of Landscape Architects Book 
Award: Paul J. Klens, Mill Hall, PA 

Landscape Architecture Faculty Honor Award: Matthew John Ingalls, Fayette- 
ville 

Landscape Architecture Faculty Service Award: Kathryn Ruth McPherson, Pitts- 
burgh, PA 

Product Design Book Award: Jamie Nell Cavin, Landis 

Visual Design Book Award: Beverly Robinson Murray 

Design Faculty Book Award: Timothy Wendell Buie, Welcome; Natalie Suszanne 
Chanin, Florence, AL 

Orion A. Boren Service Award: Bruce Eugene Fisher, Goldsboro 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Education Council Outstanding Senior Awards: 

Agricultural Education: Charlie Michael Wilder, Louisburg, NC 
Health Occupations Teacher Education: Roselyn Kouhi Egan, Raleigh, NC 
Industrial Arts Education: Kathy Sue Ussery, Star, NC 

Industrial and Technical Education: Stephanie Elaine Truesdale, New Bern, NC 
Marketing Education for Teachers: Christie Leigh Bradsher, Rolesville, NC 
Mathematics Education: Ninette Yvonne Ribet, Rutherford College, NC 
Psychology (outstanding graduating senior): Stella Eileen Anderson, New Bern, 
NC 
Psychology (general option): Karen Paquette Parkes, Greensboro, NC 
Psychology (human resource development option): Felicia Maria Bowen, Cary, NC 
Science Education: Kathleen Margaret Murphy, Albany, Georgia 



129 



Agricultural Education Awards to Most Outstanding Seniors: 

Fall 1987: Herman Edward Croom, Pikeville, NC 

Spring 1988: Arlen Franklin Johnson, Asheboro, NC 
Durwin M. Hanson Achievement Award: Charlie Michael Wilder, Louisburg, NC 
Vocational Industrial Clubs of America Collegiate Leadership Award: Stephanie 
Elaine Truesdale, New Bern, NC 

Psychology Department for Academic Achievement: Sheila Renee Greene, Lenoir, NC 
Psychology Department Award for Service to the Department: Jennifer Fleming 
Wells, Greensboro, NC 

Science Education Service Award to Outstanding Teacher: Martha Ramsey, Garner 
Senior High 

Mathematics Education Service Award to Outstanding Teacher: Donna Buchan, 
Athens Drive Senior High School 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Electrical Engineering 

Outstanding Electrical Engineering Senior: December 1987: Paul Glenn McKee; 
May 1988: Mark Bradley McCoy, Richard Lee Williams 

Engineering Senior Award for Scholarly Achievement: Frederick Richard Inder- 
maur, Greensboro (Industrial Engineering); Ellen Miller West, Cary (Mechanical 
and Aerospace Engineering): Richard Lee Williams, Matthews (Electrical and 
Computer Engineering) 

Engineering Senior Award for Citizenship and Service: Edward MacDonald 
Barnes, Pisgah Forest (Biological and Agricultural Engineering) 

Engineering Senior Award for Leadership: Mark Ray Sizemore, King (Civil 
Engineering) 

Engineering Senior Award for the Humanities: Ju Peng, Alhambra, CA (Electri- 
cal and Computer Engineering) 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Agri-Life Council Outstanding Club Member Award for Biological and Agricultu- 
ral Engineering — Science Curriculum: Daphne Mae Cartner, Mocksville 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers Student Honor Award: North Caro- 
lina Student Engineering Branch of ASAE: Randall Keith Page, Elon College 
Civil Engineering 

Associated General Contractors Award to Outstanding Senior in Civil Engineer- 
ing/Construction Option: Curtis Jon Horvat, Irwin, PA 

Civil Engineering Outstanding Teaching Assistant Awards: Hisham Ibrahim 
Abdelfattah, Egypt; Mohamed Khairy Sorour, Egypt; James Harvey Trogdon III, 
Hope Mills 

Computer Engineering 

Outstanding Computer Engineering Senior: December 1987: Charles Robert 
Yount; May 1988: Tan Thanh Duy Phan 

Furniture Manufacturing and Management 

Rudolph Willard Award, Outstanding Senior in Furniture Manufacturing and 
Management: Stephen Todd Browning, Greensboro 

Industrial Engineering 
Outstanding Industrial Engineering Student: Bhavna Harishandra Bhakta 

Materials Engineering 
Outstanding Senior Award: Paul Besser, Red Lion, PA 

Nuclear Engineering 
Outstanding Nuclear Engineering Senior Award: Ala Fayez Alzaben, Raleigh 

Textile Engineering 
Lawrence Iason Honor Award: Larry Dickinson, Hickory 

130 



COLLEGE OF FOREST RESOURCES 

Forestry 

Biltmore Work Scholarships: David G. Cole, Raleigh; Clare M. Dellwo, Raleigh; 
Timothy R. Eudy, Albemarle; Robert B. Kidd, Siler City; Mark V. Pearson, Morgan- 
ton; Edward W. Sontag, Raleigh; Michelle L. Spersrud, Raleigh 

Ralph C. Bryant Scholarship Award: Forrest H. Teague, Jr., Goldsboro 

E. F. Conger Scholarship: Christopher F. Dumas, Wilmington; Jerold M. Bryant, 
Durham 

James L. Goodwin Awards: GwenW . Amick, Ann Arbor, MI; Russell A.Anderson, 
Raleigh; Barbara A. Boothroyd, Asheville; Paul T. Eriksson, Ledgewood, NJ; 
Timothy R. Eudy, Albemarle; Eduardo L. Garcia, Old San Juan, PR; John H. 
Grogan, III, Raleigh; Thomas J. Margo, Stokesdale; Deborah L. Nahikian, Asheville; 
Ian C. Shannon, Sharon, MA; Forrest H. Teague, Jr., Goldsboro; T. Dale Thrash, 
Pisgah Forest; Paula S. Troxell, Pittsburgh, PA; Randall F. West, Jr., Andrews 

Jonathan Wainhouse Memorial Scholarship Awards: James W . Hauser, Raleigh; 
David Bruce Powell, Jr., Franklin, VA; James F. Shern, Derwood, MD 

George C. Slocum Award: Larry E. Ridenhour, Raleigh 

John M. and Sally Blalock Beard Forestry Scholarship: Jonathan M. Bog'rad, 
Charlotte; Rodney B. Buchanan, Bakersville; Bradley C. Duckworth, Rocky Mount; 
Matthew B. Vincett, Raleigh 

N. C. Forestry Foundation (Minority): Thomas M. Alston, Georgetown, SC; Brenda 
L. Anderson, Bethel; Fagin G. Fisher, New Bern; Gisele R. Letlough, Greensboro; 
Eric Logan, Greensboro; Paul A. Meggett, Charlotte 
Xi Sigma Pi Scholarship: Dennis S. Detar, Concord 

Garden Club of North Carolina: Clare M. Dellwo, Raleigh; Matthew B. Vincett, 
Raleigh 

Wood Science and Technology 

Pulp and Paper Technology 
Alonzo Aldrich Scholarship: Robert Glenn McRee, Rome, GA 
Dietrich V. Asten Scholarship: Jeffrey Wilson Thornton, Charlotte 
Betz Laboratories, Inc. Scholarship: Scott Page LeGrand, Richmond, VA 
M. Lebby Boinest, Jr. Scholarship: David Alston Chesnutt, Turkey 
William E. Caldwell Scholarship: John William Graves, Pensacola, FL 
Lawrence H. Camp Scholarship: Larry Scott Jackson, Ashland, VA 
Caraustar Industries Scholarship: Scott Alexander Hamilton, Waynesville 
J. Robert Carpenter Scholarship: Matthew Wilson Barbour, Raleigh 
Terri P. Charbonnier Scholarship: Christopher Andrew Mastro, Chester, VA 
Drs. Li-Sho & Lee-Fun Chang Scholarship: Albert Keith Williams, Roanoke 

Rapids 
Charles W. Coker, Sr. Scholarship: Patrick Wayne Low, Rock Hill, SC 
Continental Forest Industries Scholarship: John Charles Single, Atlanta, GA 
Salesmen 's Society to the Dixie Pulp and Paper Mills Scholarship: Kai Simonsen, 

Raleigh 
Eugene E. Ellis Scholarship: William Gregory Fullenwider, Lewisport, KY 
Robert G. Hitchings Scholarship: Richard Arthur Venditti, Monroe, CT 
International Paper Company Scholarship: Jack Leonard Robinson, Elkin 
James River Corporation Scholarship: W. McClinton Lipscomb, Jr., West Point, 

VA 
John R. Kennedy Scholarship: Jasdev Singh Gill, Augusta, GA 
John Milton May, Jr. Scholarship: Robert Shean Cumbee, Supply 
Nalco Scholarship: Barbara Ann Ludwig, Tell City, IN 
George E. Oakley Scholarship: Ronald Bowman Tucker, Browns Summit 
Sture G. Olsson Scholarship: Kevin Jerome Gramelspacher, Tell City, IN 
Paper Chase Scholarship: Stacy Ray Lee, Vanceboro 
C. Ciine Peters Scholarship: Gerald Wayne Marks, Cameron 
Harry H. Saunders Scholarship: Gavin Lee Gaynor, Hawesville, KY 
Dr. Fred B. Schelhorn Scholarship: Julie Lynn Goffinet, Tell City, IN 
Shouvlin Family Scholarship: John Gerhard Michael, Warner Robins, GA 
Ray Smith Scholarship: Mitchell Alan Malcolm, Centerville, GA 
Southeastern PIMA Scholaiship: Kathleen Carrell French, Raleigh 

131 



Southern PIMA Scholarship: James Edward Bradbury, Lufkin, TX 
Stone Container Corporation Scholarship: Joseph William Johnson, Mauldin, SC 
Dwigkt J. Thomson Scholarship: Robert Wade Harris, Vidor, TX 
Union Camp Corporation Scholarship: Christopher William Blenk, Savannah, 
GA 

Vinings Chemical Scholarship: Melinda Joyce McDaniel, Warner Robins, GA 
Weyerhaeuser Company Scholarship: Andrea L. Nelson, Macon, GA 

Wood Science & Technology 

Carolina Canadian Lumber Sales Scholarship: Gregory R. Kasten, Edwardsville, 
IL 

The Roy Carter Scholarship: Kenneth W. Odom, Jr., Severn 

Weyerhaeuser Company Scholarship: Eugene W. Brown III, Rich Square; Leo- 
nard E. Byrd, Wilmington; Kevin D. Griffin, Williamston; Roger G. Poindexter, 
Troy; James A. Snyder, Monroe; Stephen M. Strand, Greensboro; Reynolds A. Trull, 
Henderson 

COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Highest Scholastic Achievement Awards 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences: Kenneth Richard Rose 
Department of Economics and Business: Kelly Moore Carter, Raleigh (Account- 
ing); Shari Elizabeth Kirk, Cary (Business Management); Sheila Jane Stone, 
Raleigh (Economics) 
Department of English: Kenneth Richard Rose, Pittsburgh, PA 
Department of Foreign Language and Literatures: Catherine Helen Lloyd, Cary 
Department of History: Mark Daniel Chapman, Raleigh 

Department of Political Science & Public Administration: William Murray Downs, 
Raleigh 
Department of Philosophy and Religion: Andrea Michelle Herr, Lancaster, PA 
Department of Sociology and Anthropology: Carol Rose Jernigan, Dunn (Sociol- 
ogy); Jacqueline Stevens Conord, New Bern (Social Work) 
Department of Speech Communication: Stacy Lynn Smith, Cary 
Outstanding Senior Awards: Male: Brian Phillip Brauns, Pleasant Garden; 
Female: Lisa Marie Beeman, Chocowinity 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL AND MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

School Awards to Outstanding Seniors 
Scholarship: Sheila Jane Stone, Raleigh; Mary Amelia Woessner, Cary 
Citizenship and Sendee: Kathryn Joanne Hoxsie, Raleigh 
Humanities: John Taylor, Rocky Mount 
Leadership: Cathleen Dawn Roberts, Greensboro 

Departmental Awards 
Chemistry 

The North Carolina Institute of Chemists' Outstanding Student Award: Rima 
Salim Al-Awar, Raleigh 

The Merck Index Awards for Scholastic Achievement in Chemistry: Paula Black- 
man Huffman, Goldsboro 

The CRC Press Freshman Chemistry Achievement Award: John Edward Davis, 
Forest City 

The 1988 Undergraduate Award in Analytical Chemistry: Ho Sung Cho, Chapel 
Hill 

Physics 

Outstanding Graduating Senior in Physics: Timothy Michael Delsole, Winston- 
Salem 

Hubert L. Owen Scholarship: Adam Lyon, Cary 

Statistics 
Outstanding Graduating Senior in Statistics: Richard Allen Bynum, Goldsboro 

132 



Mathematics 
Outstanding Graduating Senior in Mathematics: Sheila Stone, Raleigh 
John Cell Scholarships: Tonya Lynn Etchinson, Raleigh 
Mary Alice and Hubert V. Park Scholarship: Donald Carver, Hudson 
Jack Levine-Charles Anderson Award: Randolph Rowell, Holly Springs 
Charles Anderson Award: Scott Gray, Raleigh 
Charles F. Lewis Scholarship: James Brantley, Salem 

Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 

Outstanding Graduating Senior in Geology /Geophysics: James Nathan Johnston, 
Raleigh 

Outstanding Graduating Senior in Meteorology: Steven Rice Chiswell, Derwood, 
MD 

COLLEGE OF TEXTILES 

Joseph D. Moore Honor Award: Benjamin W. Swain, Charlotte 
Harry Ball Honor Award: Elizabeth L. Smith, Wilmington 
Lawrence Iason Honor Award: Larry C. Dickinson, Hickory 
Chester H. Roth Honor Award: S. Machell McCourry, Conover 
John M. Reeves Scholarship: Paul L. Latten, Pineville 
Murray Frumkin Honor Award: Sylvie C. Hudgins, Cary 
Textile Veterans Association Honor Award: Stephanie A. Sigmon, Newton 
John E. Reeves Award: Mary Beth Sabio, Oakland, NJ 
Donald F. McCullough Award: A. Art Roberson, Zebulon 
John N. Gregg Award: Rona L. Reid, Charlotte 

American Association of Textile Chemists & Colorists Award: Carol L. Shay, 
Charlotte 
Phi Psi Textile Fraternity Award: Jacqueline C. Wentz, Arden 
American Association for Textile Technology Award: Leslie G. Woodburn, Greens- 
boro 
Sigma Tau Sigma Scholarship Fraternity Award: To be announced 
Kappa Tau Beta Student Leadership Award: Martha C. Lambeth, Greensboro 
Delta Kappa Phi Textile Fraternity: Tracy L. Haley, Kannapolis 
Henry A. Rutherford Honorary Award: Jonathan A. Childress, Gibsonville 
AAM A- Apparel Student of the Year: Jean Duval Mozier. Medford, NJ 
The Deans Award: Martha C. Lambeth, Greensboro 

ALUMNI ATHLETIC AWARD 

Vincent J. DelNegro, Springfield, MA 



THE HONOR SOCIETY OF PHI KAPPA PHI, 
GRADUATING SENIOR MEMBERS 



Amy Elizabeth Adams 
Michael Eugene Adams 
Rima Salim Al-Awar 
Wendy Jo Alphin 
Stella Eileen Anderson 
Marty Allen Baker 
John Daniel Beasley 
Douglas O'Neal Bell 
Steven Langley Blake 
William S. Boswell 
Felicia Maria Bowen 
Lisa Ann Brone 
David Allen Browder 
Sheryl Denise Brown 
Stephen Todd Browning 
Cynthia Bell Buzzard 
Kelly Moore Carter 
Suk Chu Chan 
Lori Lynn Coggins 



Patrick M. Comyn 
Donna Lee Costner 
Timothy M. Delsole 
Larry C. Dickinson 
William Murray Downs 
Georgene M. Eakes 
Jack Ray Edwards, Jr. 
James William Edwards 
Roselyn Kouhi Egan 
Mary Froese Enns 
Tonya Lynn Etchison 
Marjorie Alice Faust 
Steven Clark Fawcett 
Donna Kelly Flowers 
Rebecca Ann Gallagher 
Gavin Lee Gaynor 
B.J. Gegg-Harrison 
Wanda B. Gilchrist 
Susan Gail Gooch 



Timothy Leon Grady 
Rodney Ray Green 
Robey David Greene 
Elizabeth D. Greulich 
David Charles Hall 
Brian Keith Harris 
Basil Hassan 
Halvor Warren Hem, IV 
Lysa Marie Holbrook 
Shelia Crocker Hopkins 
Curtis Jon Horvat 
Jennifer Rider Howard 
Douglas James Hudson 
Paula Blackman Huffman 
Andrij Walter Huryn 
Frederick R. Indermaur 
Sheri Lorraine Jackson 
Wade Eric Jackson 
Robert Otis Jenkins 

133 



Carol Rose Jernigan 
Daniel Henry Johnson 
Ronald E. Johnson, Jr. 
Kyung-Pyo Jun 
Karen Chaney Kauffman 
Sanja Sue Kennedy 
Shari Elizabeth Kirk 
Michael M. Koutsourais 
Martha Craig Lambeth 
Eddie Wayne Lawrence 
Wilford A. Leonard, Jr. 
Catherine Helen Lloyd 
Tingang Lu 
Deborah S. Maness 
Melanie Ann Mann 
Alvin Archer Mason III 
Mark Bradley McCoy 
Kevin Neil McKisson 
Elizabeth A. Middleton 
Jeanne Elaine Miller 
Angela Adams Mitchell 
Karen Downer Mitchell 
Taryn Leigh Moody 
Stewart Todd Morgan 
Elizabeth Diane Mynatt 
David Andrew Nailor 
Jane Felton Nally 
W.K. Neighbors, III 



Paige Meredith Newland 
Barbara Ann Newman 
Robert Jay Nix 
Brian Scott O'Kelley 
Kathryn Love Ormsby 
Donald Thomas O'Tool 
Amitkumar M. Paradkar 
Jong Shin Park 
Donna Gail Patterson 
James Russell Peeler 
Lynn Page Perkinson 
Tan Thanh Duy Phan 
Amir Pirzadeh 
A. Pizzoni-Ardemani 
Ronald Julian Plummer 
Victoria Lee Reardin 
Alan Jerome Reiman 
Pablo Reiter 
Ninette Yvonne Ribet 
Rebecca Kay Robertson 
Charles K. Robinson 
Bryan Eric Rodgers 
Rabab Ahmad Saadi 
Mark Daniel Schmidt 
Steven Ernest Schultz 
Sharon Brown Settlage 
Suzanne R. Sewell 
Christopher R. Simmons 



PHI KAPPA PHI ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS 

Seniors 

Kelly L. Berkstresser 
Cynthia Bell Buzzard 
Frederick R. Indermaur 
Sanja Sue Kennedy 
Mark Bradley McCoy 
Elizabeth A. Middleton 
Michael Dean Neaves 



Carolyn H. Smoak 
Steven Mark Snider 
Mohammed Sriti 
Dennis E. Stallings 
Hygie Irene Starr 
Daniel James St. Clair 
Sheila Jane Stone 
Hugh Blake Svendsen 
Pearl Jennifer Tejano 
Matthew T. Terribile 
Jonathan E. Thompson 
William Cline Tolley 
Maureen 0. Vandermaas 
Mark Stephen Viglanco 
Kimberly Gay Wade 
Johnny C. Weeks, III 
James R. Westmoreland 
Gail Lynn Whitehouse 
Jane Elizabeth Wiggs 
Richard Lee Williams 
Paul Wesley Wilson 
Sherry Lynn Wilson 
Jennifer Rose Wood 
James Steven Worley 
Cindy J. Yetka 
Derek Todd Young 
Thomas Wade Young 



Tan Thanh Duy Phan 
Armando Pizzoni-Ardemani 
Ninette Yvonne Ribet 
Amy Kennett Stout 
Shawn Michael Toffolo 
Richard Lee Williams 



Juniors 



Jeffrey Gordon Crater 
Roselyn Kouhi Egan 
James William Hauser 
Ronald Leo Meggison, Jr. 

Nominee for National Society Fellowship: 
Lisa Ann Brone 
Dr. Debra W. Stewart 



Kimberly Ann Monroe 
Charles Allan Morse 
Leslie Gail Wehe 
Leigh Ann Young 



GOLDEN CHAIN HONOR SOCIETY MEMBERS FOR 1987-88 



Jeffrey Franklin Cherry 
Jeffrey Gordon Crater 
David Lewis Fu 
Tamara Yvette Jackson 
Christopher Walker Johnson 



Tori Marie Morhard 
Donn Christopher Mueller 
Pamela Ann Rose 
Jane Elizabeth Stover 
Leigh Ann Young 



134 



ARMY ROTC AWARDS 

Department of the Army Superior Cadet Award: MS I, George L. Coppit; MS II 
John W. Brennan; MS III, Steven T. McGugan; MS IV, Robert L. Mickey 

Association of the United States Army Award: Matthew B. Vincett 

Reserve Officers Association Award: MS II, Kyle R. Harper; MS III, Michelle L. 
Mincey; MS IV, Gregory N. Washington 

Society of American Military Engineers Award: Phillip D. Chelf 

American Legion Award for Military Excellence: MS III, Todd A. Grubb; MS IV, 
George B. Spence III 

American Legion Award for Scholastic Excellence: MS III, David L. Emmett; MS 
IV, Brian K. Harris 

American Veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam Award: Christian Popa 

National Sojourners Award: Sarah M. Small 

Military Order of World Wars: MS I, Michael W. Brennan II; MS II, Karen E 
Schroeder; MS III, David B. Slaughter 

Daughters of the American Revolution: Jeffrey S. Kulp 

Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America: Barry E. Ginn 

George C. Marshall Award: Barry F. Huggins 

American Defense Preparedness Association: Richard C. Dyer 

Retired Officers Association Award: Jeffrey A. Bhe 

Braxton Bragg Chapter of the Association of the United States Army (A USA) 
Award: John D. Harrison 

Veterans of Foreign Wars Award: Georges J. Sawyer IV 

Sons of the American Revolution Award: George L. Fattal 

General Dynamics Corporation Award for Outstanding Achievement: Kenneth R. 
Riggsbee II 



135 



Army ROTC Commissionees 

DECEMBER 1987 

William D. Thurmond Cary 

MAY 1988 

Robert C. Alridge III Richmond, VA 

Allen B. Bailey Manson 

James A. Barnwell III Burlington 

Jeffrey A. Bhe Fayetteville 

George H. Bourgeois, Jr Hamlet 

Elsbeth J. Chapman Rougemont 

Clarence E. Cherry, Jr Kelford 

Jennifer B. Cross Forest City 

William G. Eades Goldsboro 

Robin A. Ellerbe Fayetteville 

Terrence E. Evans Philadelphia, PA 

Rodney E. Frazier Morehead City 

Brian K. Harris Wilson 

John D. Harrison Rockingham 

Blair L. Hawkins Charlottesville, VA 

Jeffrey S. Kulp Charlotte 

Kervo F. Locklear Rowland 

David J. Lubinski Fayetteville 

David A. Markowski Havelock 

William E. Maxwell Pink Hill 

Robert L. Mickey Winston-Salem 

Calvin R. Moore Ahoskie 

Juphenia L. Parker Wilmington 

Howard J. Pickett Burlington 

Kenneth R. Riggsbee II Chapel Hill 

George B. Spence III Owings, MD 

Christopher E. Verwoerdt Durham 

Gregory N. Washington Durham 

TO BE COMMISSIONED IN JULY 1988 

Alicia G. Bridgeman Fayetteville 

Ellen D. Loy Martinsburg, WV 



Navy ROTC Commissionees 

John E. Eans Raleigh 

Mark Hutnam Raleigh 

Eric S. Lewis Shannon 

Joseph T. Neville Dunn 

William C. Elliott West Jefferson 

Richard W. Ellis Wyckoff, NJ 

Scott D. Moore Wilmington, DE 



136 



Air Force ROTC Commissionees 

DECEMBER 1987 

*Kimberly D. Boone Elm City 

Robert K.D. Boone Emporia, VA 

Roy T. Ellis Fayetteville 

Lynn W. Evans Greenville 

Timothy J. Fennell Cherry Point 

Leonard P. Harrison Goldsboro 

Kenneth S. Klawonn Conway, SC 

*David A. Koukol Richmond, VA 

James E. Moore Greensboro 

Joseph H. Newberry Hickory 

Leon H. Morris Goldsboro 

*Scott M. Teel Raleigh 

MAY 1988 

Kathryn Covert Roanoke, VA 

Deborah A. Crawford Pine Knoll Shores 

Jeffrey E. Getz Fayetteville 

Denette L. Sleeth Novelty, OH 

Teresa S. Bass Lucama 

Aaron T. Blocker Winston-Salem 

William S. Brinley Columbia, MD 

Andrew P. Cadden St Davids, PA 

William J. Compton Raleigh 

Michael R. Dennis Raeford 

Eric G. Hansen Fayetteville 

Thomas C. Moore Belmont 

Grover C. Perdue Fayetteville 

James M. Phillips Chapel Hill 

Christophe F. Roach Goldsboro 

AUGUST 1988 

Richard A. Gibson Salisbury 

James C. Thomas Greenville 

*Kevin H. Van Hall Raleigh 



*Distinguished Graduate. 



137 



1988 COMMENCEMENT 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The following non-University organizations have 
contributed significantly to the success of our 
commencement. 

Mr. Frank Greathouse, Owner 
Realizations, Inc., Raleigh, N.C. 

Design and Implementation 
of Stage Backdrop 

Mr. Wade C. Miller, Jr., Owner 
Sound Engineering, Asheboro, N.C. 

Sound Systems 

Mr. Graham Rouse, Balloon Master 
ABC Creations, Raleigh, N.C. 

Visual Effects 



138 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Agricultural Institute 




University Student Center 

North Carolina State University 

May 6, 1988 



TWENTY-SEVENTH 
AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE 

EXERCISES OF GRADUATION 

School of Agriculture and Life Sciences 
Durward F. Bateman, Dean 

Presiding 

May 6, 1988 
3:00 p.m. 

*PROCESSIONAL 

♦INVOCATION C. Grady Long 

Pastor 
Salem Baptist Church 
Apex, North Carolina 

ADDRESS Charles L. Tomlinson 

Landscape Engineer 

North Carolina Department of Transportation 

Greenville, North Carolina 

AWARDING OF DIPLOMAS Durward F. Bateman, Dean 

James L. Oblinger, Associate Dean and 
Director of Academic Affairs 

H. Bradford Craig, Associate Director 

of Academic Affairs and Director of 

the Agricultural Institute 

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

STUDENT COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER Charles W. Herlocker 

REMARKS Bruce R. Poulton 

Chancellor 
North Carolina State University 

RECOGNITION OF MARSHALS Durward F. Bateman, Dean 

♦BENEDICTION C. Grady Long 

♦RECESSIONAL 

Reception Immediately Following the Graduation Ceremony 
♦Please Stand 






AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE GRADUATES 

May 6, 1988 

AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

Paul Gregory Amburn 
+ + John Edward Ashe, Jr. 

+ t Me' Alan Ferrell 

+ Larry Steven Martin 

$ Todd Marshall-Raymond Meyer 

Thomas Worth Smith 
+ Reginald Howard Strickland 

• Joseph Shane Varnell 

AGRICULTURAL PEST CONTROL 

• Kevin Blackwell Weeks 

FIELD CROPS TECHNOLOGY 

Jerry Wendell Griffin 
*• Charles Wayne Herlocker 

Larry Josephus Jones 
Samuel Frank Keziah, III 

• Joel Reece Poindexter 

FOOD PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION, AND SERVICE 

Allen Ward Bell 
Elizabeth Irene Blum 

• Johnny Ray Hayes 

• Rodney Ray Lewis 

• • + $ Stephen Ek Teong Loo 

• Darrick Maurice Rodgers 

• • Darrell Edwin Smith 

• B. Elaine Wheeler 

+ William Gerald Wilson 

GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

+ Ronald David Alcorn 

Edward Scott Sewell 

LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY 

Kevin Dale Cadigan 

• • Mark Timothy Clark 

• Merrie Beth Flynn 
Brian Edward Page 
Jean Meredith Phifer 

• • Kevin Duane Powell 

William Barrett Sadler 
Kurt Moore Wagoner 

• • William Russell Wagoner 



ORNAMENTALS AND LANDSCAPE TECHNOLOGY 



+ $ Tony Ray Arnold 

** + t Gary Anthony Cooper 

** + $ Katherine Henderson Humphries 

+ $ Barry Raymond Kelly 

Ronald Eugene Leonard 
** • Cheryl Ann Lindsay 

William Fred McClure. Jr. 

+ $ Bruce Lane Myers 

* Calvin Larkin Peed 

* Jake Lee Phillips, Jr. 

* t Jeffrey Oliver Preddy 
** Karen Marie Steele 

* Susan MacKinnis Sutton 

TUREGRASS MANAGEMENT 

+ Duane Everette Dawes 

Mark Hamilton Dowd 

* * Alan Crowder Erwin 
John Eric Feagans 
Michael Ernest Hayes 
Mark Allan Kriews 
Douglas Thompson Morris 

* * • + t Richard Lawson Oldenburg 
Christopher Kent Randall 
Gregory Lewis Robertson 
William Eugene Smith 
James Christopher Wood 



• • 



+ 
+ 
• • 



• • 

• • 



DOUBLE MAJORS 

Martin Joseph Acker 
Ashley Aderson Betts 






* Robert Collins Blades, Jr. 

William Everett Bryant 
Stephen Mark Buchanan 
Bonnie Haynes Dickerson 
Jerome Lee Dodson 
Robert Stephen Hearn 
Christopher Wright Hunt 
Jeffrey Lynn Lassiter 
John Gregory Little 
Donald Gene Madre. Jr. 
Timothy Reid Parker 
Michael Joseph Paul 
Jeffrey Kevin Sloan 
Randall Allen Smith 
James Bryan Turner 
Gary Wayne Watson, Jr. 
John Newton Young 

• •High Honors 

• Honors 

• Agribusiness Concentration 
+ Graduated December, 1987 
t In Absentia 



• 



• • 

• 

+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 

• • • 

• • + 

• • 

• 



MARSHALS 

Margaret Piner Langston 

William Thomas Lawrence 

Christopher Douglas Pace 

Jefferson Chandler Sadler 

Mark Sellers 

Warren Lee Cloer 



J 









orth Carolina State 







VOLUME 88 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY 
FEBRUARY 1988 



NUMBER 1 



Published four times a year in February, June, August and December by North Carolina State University. Department of 
Admissions, Peele Hall, Box 7103, Raleigh, N. C. 27695-7103. 

Bulletin Editors: John F. Cudd. Jr., Director. Summer Sessions: Nancy E. Polk, Assistant Director. Summer Sessions; 
Barbara Fraser, Secretary. 



This bulletin is intended for information purposes only. Requirements, rules, proce- 
dures, courses and informational statements set forth herein are subject to change. 
Notice of changes will be conveyed to duly enrolled students and other appropriate 
persons at the time such changes are effected. 



INSERT FOLDOUT HERE 



DEFINITIONS OF ETHNIC GROUPS 

White (not of Hispanic origin). Persons having origins in any of the original peoples of 
Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East. 

American Indian or Alaskan Native. Persons having origins in any of the original peoples 
of North America, and who maintain cultural identification through tribal affiliation or 
community recognition. 

Black (not of Hispanic origin). Persons having origins in any of the black racial groups. 

Asian or Pacific Islander. Persons having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far 
East, Southeast Asia, the Indian Subcontinent, or the Pacific Islands. This includes for 
example, China, Japan, Korea, the Philippine Islands, American Samoa. 

Hispanic. Persons of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other 
Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. 




SUMMER SESSIONS 1988 

North Carolina State University 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



SUMMER SESSIONS 1988 

REGISTRATION APPLICATION 

INFORMATION 



STUDENTS ELIGIBLE TO USE THE ENCLOSED SUMMER SESSIONS 
REGISTRATION APPLICATION: 

Only Lifelong Education students are eligible to use the enclosed Summer 
Sessions Registration Application. 

The Registration Application form must be used by all visiting students from 
other colleges or universities who will be classified as Lifelong Education students 
and by all students who are currently classified as Lifelong Education students at 
North Carolina State University. 

A Lifelong Education student is one who has not been formally admitted as a 
degree candidate to North Carolina State University and does not wish regular 
classification of any kind at the University. See page 10, Lifelong Education 
Students, for additional information. 

NOTE: All Lifelong Education students (including those from other universities 
and colleges) are advised that NCSU degree students are always given 
priority for Summer Sessions classes. Acceptance of the Registration 
Application for Lifelong Education students by the Summer Sessions 
Office in no way constitutes a guarantee that class space will be available. 

STUDENTS NOT ELIGIBLE TO USE THE ENCLOSED SUMMER SES- 
SIONS REGISTRATION APPLICATION: 

1. The Registration Application form is not to be used by any classified degree 
candidate, undergraduate or graduate, now attending North Carolina State 
University. Such students must preregister through their advisers (see page 
13). 

2. The Registration Application form is not to be used by any student who has 
previously enrolled as a degree candidate at North Carolina State University. 
Such students (former students returning) must apply for readmission to the 
University by writing to the Department of Registration and Records, North 
Carolina State University, Box 7313, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7313 (see 
page 13). 

INFORMATION: 

For additional information about the Summer Sessions write to: 

The Director of Summer Sessions 
North Carolina State University 
Box 7401 

Raleigh, N.C. 27695-7401 
or call (919) 737-2265. 



CONTENTS 



Administration 4 

Summer Sessions Calendars 1988 5 

First Session 5 

Second Session 5 

Ten-Week Session 6 

North Carolina State University 7 

The Summer Sessions 9 

Admissions 9 

Registration Procedures 13 

Academic Regulations 18 

Expenses 18 

Financial Aid 22 

Counseling Center 22 

Housing 23 

D. H. Hill Library 25 

Summer Activities 26 

University Student Center 26 

Special Courses and Institutes 27 

NCSU Middle School Workshop 27 

Regional Summer School for Adult, Extension and Community 

College Educators 28 

Institute for Teachers of Gifted and Talented 28 

Special Workshops for Mathematics and Science Teachers 29 

Teaching of Writing Institute 30 

Highlands Biological Station 31 

Evening Summer Sessions 32 

Summer Institute in English for Speakers of Other Languages 33 

Independent Study by Extension 34 

Course Listings 37 

Late Afternoon and Evening Classes 116 

Summer Sessions Faculty 123 

Campus Map 131 




NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE UNIVERSITY 



ADMINISTRATION 

Bruce R. Poulton, Chancellor 

Nash N. Winstead, Provost and Vice Chancellor 

Debra W. Stewart, Interim Vice Provost and Dean of Graduate School 

Franklin D. Hart, Vice Chancellor for Research 

George L. Worsley, Vice Chancellor for Finance and Business 

William L. Turner, Vice Chancellor for Extension and Public Service 

Thomas H. Stafford Jr., Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs 

John T. Kanipe Jr., Vice Chancellor for Foundations and University Relations 

DEANS OF THE COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

Durward F. Bateman, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Claude E. McKinney, School of Design 

Carl J. Dolce, College of Education and Psychology 

Larry K. Monteith, College of Engineering 

Eric L. El! wood, College of Forest Resources 

William B. Toole, III, College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

Garrett Briggs, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

Robert A. Barnhardt, College of Textiles 

Terrence M. Curtin, College of Veterinary Medicine 

SUMMER SESSIONS 

William L. Turner, Vice Chancellor for Extension and Public Service 
John F. Cudd Jr., Director 
Nancy E. Polk, Assistant Director 

ADMISSIONS 

George R. Dixon, Director 

REGISTRATION 

James H. Bundy, University Registrar 



March 31 


Thursday 


May 23 


Monday 


May 24 


Tuesday 


May 25 


Wednesday 



SUMMER SESSIONS CALENDARS 

1988 

FIRST SESSION (MAY 23-JUNE 28) 

Last day to preregister 

Registration/Change Day 

First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 

instructor 

Last day to add a course; last day to withdraw or drop a 

course with a refund (NOTE: The tuition and fees charge is 

based on the number of hours and courses officially carried 

as of this date.) 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 400 level or 

below without a grade, last day to change from credit to 

audit at the 400 level or below, last day for all students to 

change from letter grade to credit only. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 500 or 600 

level without a grade 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 



May 30 



June 3 



Monday 



Friday 



June 10 

June 24 
June 27, 28 



Friday 

Friday 

Monday, 

Tuesday 



FIRST SESSION FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 
Examination Times 0800-1100 1300-1600 1800-2100 



Monday, June 27 
Tuesday, June 28 


Hour Class Actually Begins During the Session 


0730, 0800, 0910 


1140 


1745 


0950, 1020 


1300, 1340 


1915, 1945 



SECOND SESSION (JULY 5-AUGUST 10) 



May 19 


Thursday 


Julv 5 


Tuesday 


July 6 


Wednesday 


July 7 


Thursday 



Julv 11 



Julv 15 



July 22 



Monday 



Friday 



Friday 



August 8 Monday 

August 9, 10 Tuesday, 

Wednesday 



Last day to preregister 

Registration/Change Day 

First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 

instructor 

Last day to add a course; last day to withdraw or drop a 

course with a refund (NOTE: The tuition and fees charge is 

based on the number of hours and courses officially carried 

as of this date.) 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 400 level or 

below without a grade, last day to change from credit to 

audit at the 400 level or below, last day for all students to 

change from letter grade to credit only. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 500 or 600 

level without a grade 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 



SECOND SESSION FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 
Examination Times 0800-1100 1300-1600 1800-2100 



Tuesday, August 9 
Wednesday. August 10 


Hour Class Actually Begins During the Session 


0730. 0800, 0910 


1140 


1745 


0950, 1020 


1300, 1340 


1915. 1945 



TEN-WEEK SESSION (MAY 23-AUGUST 10) 

Last day to preregister 
Registration/Change Day 
First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 
instructor 

Last day to add a course; last day to withdraw or drop a 
course with a refund (NOTE: The tuition and fees charge is 
based on the number of hours and courses officially carried 
as of this date.) 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 400 
level or below without a grade, last day to change from 
credit to audit at the 400 level or below, last day for all 
students to change from letter grade to credit only. 
Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 500 
or 600 level without a grade 
Holiday 

Last day of classes for Tuesday/Thursday classes 
Final examinations for 1745 Tuesday/Thursday classes 
Last day of classes for Monday/ Wednesday classes 
Final examinations for 1915, 1945 Tuesday/ 
Thursday classes 

Final examinations for 1745, Monday/Wednes- 
day classes 

Final examinations for 1915, 1945 Monday/ 
Wednesday classes 

"First date for Tuesday/Thursday classes. Date in parentheses for Monday/Wednesday 
classes. 



March 31 


Thursday 


Mav23 


Monday 


May 24 (25)* 


Tuesday 




(Wednesday) 


May 26 (30)* 


Thursday 




(Monday) 


May 30 


Monday 


June 14(15)* 


Tuesday 




(Wednesday) 


June 21 (22)* 


Tuesday 




(Wednesday) 


July 4 


Monday 


July 28 


Thursday 


August 2 


Tuesday 


August 3 


Wednesday 


August 4 


Thursday 


August 8 


Monday 


August 10 


Wednesday 



TEN-WEEK SESSION FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

(As noted in the calendar above) 






.'*^k 



"^r-^^rir^ 



rw-*r^ 






— < 



Prominent in the above aerial of the central North Carolina State University campus are 
three high-rise residence halls (foreground), the circular Harrelson Hall with the adjacent 
towers of Cox and Dabney Halls, and in the upper left, the tower of the D. H. Hill Library. 
The central campus encompasses some 623 acres. 



North Carolina 
State University 



North Carolina State University is one of the nation's major public research 
universities. As a Land-Grant state university it shares the distinctive character- 
istics of these institutions nationally — broad academic offerings, extensive public 
service, national and international activities, and large-scale extension and 
research programs. 

The University is organized in eight colleges, the School of Design and the 
Graduate School. The eight colleges are Agriculture and Life Sciences, Educa- 
tion and Psychology, Engineering, Forest Resources, Humanities and Social 
Sciences, Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Textiles, and Veterinary Medi- 
cine. In addition, a complex of divisions, institutes, and centers provides for a 
wide range of special academic, research, and extension programs. 

NCSU's rich and varied academic programs include 86 undergraduate degree 
programs spanning 82 fields of study, 105 master's degree programs spanning 75 



fields of study, 48 doctoral degree programs and the doctor of veterinary medi- 
cine program. 

Research activities cover a broad spectrum of about 1,400 scientific, technolog- 
ical and scholarly endeavors supported by an annual budget of approximately 
$110 million. 

Extension work on a statewide basis in each of the 100 counties and the 
Cherokee Indian Reservation carries the University's activities throughout the 
state. 

The University has approximately 5,600 employees. Faculty and other aca- 
demic personnel total 2,900, a number which includes 1,400 graduate faculty and 
250 adjunct faculty. 

NCSU's campus totals 1700 acres— a figure which includes the Central Cam- 
pus, the College of Veterinary Medicine, and the new Centennial Campus. In 
addition, NCSU has 88,000 acres on a statewide basis, including one research and 
endowment forest of 78,000 acres. Near the campus are 2,500 University acres 
which include research farms; biology and ecology sites; genetics, horticulture 
and floriculture nurseries; teaching and research forests; and areas such as 
Carter-Finley Stadium. 

The University's Wolfpack athletic teams are well-known nationally. The bas- 
ketball team was national champion in 1974 and 1983. The football team has been 
the Atlantic Coast Conference champion five times and co-champion twice and 
has won five bowl games. Numerous NCSU athletes have won NCAA, national 
and international honors, including medals in the last five Olympics. The inter- 
collegiate cross-country men's and women's teams have won many titles in recent 
years. 

North Carolina State University (along with Duke University and the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) is one of three Research Triangle Universi- 
ties forming the points of a 30-mile triangle encompassing the Research Triangle 
Park where numerous major U.S. corporations have located research divisions. 
Also within the park are the Research Triangle Institute, a contract research 
organization, and the Triangle Universities Computation Center, a central facil- 
ity for the extensive computing activities of the institutions. 

NCSU's total enrollment is more than 24,000, including approximately 16,700 
undergraduate students, 3,500 graduate students, 3,300 Lifelong Education stu- 
dents and 500 students in other, special categories. The student population con- 
sists of approximately 14,850 men and 9,100 women and includes 2,290 black and 
789 other minority students. Students come to NCSU from nearly every state in 
the union and at least 92 foreign countries are represented by 1,107 international 
students. 

North Carolina State University is committed to equality of educational oppor- 
tunity and does not discriminate against applicants, students or employees based 
on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age or handicap. Moreover, NCSU is 
open to people of all races and actively seeks to promote racial integration by 
recruiting and enrolling a larger number of black students. 

NCSU is a member of the National Association of State Universities and 
Land-Grant Colleges, the American Council on Education, and the American 
Council of Learned Societies. 



THE SUMMER SESSIONS 

The Summer Sessions at North Carolina State University offer an extensive 
educational program planned to meet the varied needs and interests of approxi- 
mately 13,000 students. Sixty departments offer instruction in more than 700 
courses, approximately 90% of which are at the undergraduate level. 

Each of the University's nine colleges and schools, with a combined faculty of 
more than 500, participates in the Summer Sessions. The schedule includes two 
"regular" five-week sessions and a ten-week session, as well as several dozen 
evening courses scheduled for the convenience of working adults. 

Summer courses and special programs are designed for the new student, the 
undergraduate wanting to advance his or her academic standing at State, the 
graduate desiring to continue study and research during the summer months and 
for visiting students pursuing degrees at other institutions. Teachers who need to 
earn credit toward renewal of teaching certificates or advanced degrees in 
education and persons in professional fields who wish to keep abreast of new 
developments and trends also take advantage of State's summer programs. 

ADMISSIONS 

North Carolina State University is committed to equality of educational oppor- 
tunity and does not discriminate against applicants, students, or employees based 
on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or handicap. Moreover, North 
Carolina State University is open to people of all races and actively seeks to 
promote racial integration by recruiting and enrolling a larger number of black 
students. 

Students are admitted to the summer sessions in one of seven categories: 1) new 
freshmen, 2) new undergraduate transfer students, 3) new graduate students, 4) 
Lifelong Education students, 5) continuing North Carolina State University 
students, 6) former North Carolina State University students, and 7) suspended North 
Carolina State University students. 

NEW FRESHMEN 

Application forms for new freshmen should be obtained from the Director of 
Admissions, NCSU, Box 7103, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7103. The Sum- 
mer Sessions application form in this bulletin should not be completed. Applica- 
tions should be submitted in the fall of the senior year in high school. The 
application deadline is May 1. Based on past experience, applications and creden- 
tials received in the fall and early winter have received full consideration while 
those applications received later may be subject to a waiting list. A freshman 
applicant should be a graduate of an accredited secondary school. Nongraduates 
should have a high school equivalency certificate. The following high school 
preparation, or its equivalent, is necessary: English, 4 units; history or social 
studies, 2 units including U.S. history; mathematics, 2 units in algebra, 1 unit in 
geometry, 1 unit in advanced math is strongly recommended; science, 2 units, 
preferably biology, chemistry, or physics (one unit must be a laboratory science); 
foreign language, 2 units recommended but not required. 

Freshman applicants must take the Scholastic Aptitude Test. These scores, 
together with the high school record, will be considered in determining admissi- 
bility. Information as to the time and place at which the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
will be given may be obtained from high school guidance counselors, or by 
writing directly to the College Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 for 



the Bulletin of Information. The Bulletin includes an application form and is 
available without charge. 

Additional information concerning Admissions may be obtained by contacting 
the Undergraduate Admissions Office, 112 Peele Hall, Box 7103, Raleigh, N.C. 
27695-7103 (919-737-2434). 

NEW TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Students seeking transfer admission into a degree program should obtain an 
application from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and submit it before 
May 1. These students should not complete the Summer Sessions application in 
this bulletin. 

Priority will be given to students presenting 60 or more semester hours of "C" 
or better work on courses which are applicable to the degree program to which 
they are applying. The minimum overall grade point average required for 
transfer admission is 2.0; programs which are experiencing space limitations 
require a higher GPA. 

Individual official transcripts must be submitted from each institution 
attended. Students must be eligible to return to the last institution attended. 
College credits must have been earned at an accredited institution and should 
include a college-level math or the high school record must be submitted to show 
proper background. 

NEW GRADUATE STUDENTS 

All students working towards advanced degrees are enrolled in the Graduate 
School. An application for admission may be obtained from the Dean of the 
Graduate School, Box 7102, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7102. 

STUDENTS ADMITTED TO THE FALL SEMESTER 

Any student accepted for regular admission for the fall semester wishing to 
attend either summer session should notify the Admissions Office, to change the 
date of entrance. He or she should not complete a Summer Sessions application. 

LIFELONG EDUCATION STUDENTS 

Lifelong Education students must complete the Summer Sessions Registration 
Application in the front of this bulletin. A Lifelong Education student is one who 
has never been formally admitted as a degree candidate at North Carolina State 
University. All students visiting from other schools will be classified as Lifelong 
Education students. 

Lifelong Education Students — Undergraduate Studies (UGS) — This classifica- 
tion is used for individuals who have not obtained a baccalaureate degree and 
who wish to take courses but who are not currently admitted to a degree program. 
To be eligible for acceptance as an Undergraduate Lifelong Education Student, 
for the Summer Sessions an individual should: 

a. have acquired a high school diploma or GED certificate; and 

b. not be a degree candidate at North Carolina State University; or 

c. be a high school student who has been recommended by his/her school and 
approved by the Office of Admissions to take lower level courses. 



10 



Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS)— The Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) classi- 
fication is designed for U.S. citizens who wish to undertake academic work 
beyond the baccalaureate degree but who are not currently admitted to a degree 
program. This classification is not open to international students with the excep- 
tion of the spouse of a regularly enrolled NCSU student. In special cases where 
students are sponsored by an agency of the U. S. Government for specialized, 
non-degree study, approval may be given by the Graduate School for registration 
in the Post-Baccalaureate Studies classification. The following policies apply to 
students who wish to register for PBS: 

1. All must have baccalaureate degrees from accredited institutions of higher 
education. 

2. All classes taken for credit by PBS students will be graded in the usual 
manner that applies for the particular course (A, B, C, D, NC or S, U). All 
courses taken at NCSU will show on the student's transcript. If the student is 
admitted as a graduate student, a maximum of nine hours may apply toward 
the minimum requirements of the degree for which the student is enrolled, 
including hours approved for graduate credit while classified as a senior, 
unclassified undergraduate or professional engineering student. Only the 
first nine hours of course work taken at the graduate level in the PBS 
category can be accepted toward degree requirements unless a request for 
some other combination of nine hours is made by the student's advisory 
committee and approved both by the College or School Dean and the Gradu- 
ate Dean. 

3. The Grade Point Average (GPA) of a graduate student who has credits in the 
PBS category will be based on all courses taken at the 400-600 level. How- 
ever, no course taken six (6) years prior to enrollment into a program will be 
considered in the GPA calculation. 

4. Registration is limited to a maximum of two courses per session. Individuals 
who are employed fulltime should limit their PBS registration to one course 
per session. 

5. The PBS classification carries with it no implication that the student will be 
admitted to the Graduate School in any degree classification. 

6. All course work accepted for degree credit must be approved by the student's 
advisory committee as being germane to the program. Requests for degree 
credit for courses completed in the PBS classification are considered after 
admission to a graduate degree program when the student's Plan of Gradu- 
ate Work is filed with the Graduate School. 

7. PBS students are expected to familiarize themselves with Graduate School 
policies and to seek further advice or clarification as needed. 

Limitations— Persons found eligible to study as Lifelong Education students are 
not to assume that they have received formal admission to the University as 
either undergraduate or graduate degree candidates. To become a degree candi- 
date, formal application must be made through the Undergraduate Admissions 
Office or the Graduate School. Undergraduate Lifelong Education students may 
not register for more than two courses plus one physical education course per 
summer session. 

Course Availability— Persons found eligible may register for any course offered 
by the University, provided they satisfy the required course prerequisites and 
classroom space is available. 



11 



Academic Standards — The academic standards applicable to undergraduate 
students at the University also apply to Lifelong Education students. 

CONTINUING NCSU DEGREE STUDENTS 

Any regular NCSU degree candidate may attend the Summer Sessions. The 
Summer Sessions application in this bulletin must not be completed, but registra- 
tion procedures as listed on page 13 must be followed. 

READMISSION OF FORMER NCSU DEGREE STUDENTS 

Former NCSU degree students who wish to attend the Summer Sessions must 
apply for readmission through Registration and Records at least 30 days prior to 
the intended date of return. The readmission application may be obtained by 
writing to the Department of Registration and Records, NCSU, Box 7313, 
Raleigh, N.C. 27695-7313. The Summer Sessions application in this bulletin must 
not be completed, but registration procedures as listed on page 13 must be 
followed. 

SUSPENDED NCSU DEGREE STUDENTS 

NCSU degree students suspended at the end of the spring semester, 1988, may 
attend one or both sessions of the Summer Sessions to become eligible to continue 
in the fall. The Summer Sessions application in this bulletin must not be completed, 
but registration procedures as listed on page 13 must be followed. Students 
suspended prior to the spring semester, 1988, may attend one or both sessions of 
the Summer Sessions but should follow readmission procedures. The readmis- 
sion application may be obtained by writing the Department of Registration and 
Records, NCSU, Box 7313, Raleigh, N.C. 27695-7313. 




REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 

PREREGISTRATION 

All students who plan to attend, the Summer Sessions must preregister. Pre- 
registration consists of selecting the courses to be taken during the Summer 
Sessions and filing a Preregistration Schedule Request Form with Registration 
and Records. Each student who preregisters will be allowed to complete registra- 
tion by mail if tuition and fees have been paid by the deadline. The preregistra- 
tion period for all students will begin on Monday, March 21, 1988. The deadlines 
for preregistration will be: 

First Summer Session and the Ten-Week Session— Thursday, March 31, 1988 
Second Summer Session— Thursday, May 19, 1988 

Currently enrolled degree students will preregister for the Summer Sessions at 
the time they preregister for the 1988 fall semester. 

Former degree students returning may preregister for the Summer Sessions 
after they have filed an application for readmission and have received their 
letters of approval. 

New freshmen and new transfer degree students may preregister for the 
Summer Sessions after they have received their letter of approval. New students 
who desire to attend the Summer Sessions should contact the Admissions Office. 

Lifelong Education (non-degree) students will preregister for the Summer Ses- 
sions by completing the Summer Sessions Registration Application in the front of 
the Summer Sessions Bulletin and filing this with the Summer Sessions Office by 
mail or in person. 

REGISTRATION BY MAIL FOR ALL PREREGISTERED STUDENTS 

All students (undergraduate degree, graduate degree, and Lifelong Education 
(non-degree) students) who have preregistered will complete registration by mail 
if tuition and fees have been paid by the deadlines: 

First Summer Session and the Ten- Week Session — Monday, May 9, 1988 
Second Summer Session— Monday, June 20, 1988 

No class schedule will be mailed if tuition and fees are not paid in full by these 
deadlines. Class schedules will be mailed approximately one week prior to the 
beginning of classes to the student's mailing address. It is very important that all 
students notify the Department of Registration and Records of any address 
changes. Class schedules returned by the U.S. Postal Service because of an 
improper address should be picked up in 100 Harris Hall by Registration/- 
Change Day: 

First Summer Session and the Ten-Week Session— Monday, May 23, 1988 
Second Summer Session— Tuesday, July 5, 1988 

Degree Students should check with the Department of Registration and 
Records, telephone (919) 737-2572. 

Lifelong Education students (non-degree) should check with the Division for 
Lifelong Education, McKimmon Center; telephone (919) 737-2265 



13 




If a student fails to pick up a returned class schedule, the University will assume 
that the student does not wish to complete registration and the student's schedule 
will be CANCELLED. 

Remember 

There are three IMPORTANT steps required for a student to complete 
registration: 

1) Preregister by the deadline: 

First Summer Session and Ten-Week Session— Thursday, March 31, 1988 
Second Summer Session— Thursday, May 19, 1988 

2) Pay tuition and fees and all other debts to the University by the deadline: 
First Summer Session and Ten-Week Session— Monday, May 9, 1988 
Second Summer Session — Monday, June 20, 1988 

NOTE: Holds placed on class schedules could be a result of parking fines, 
library fines, gym clothes not returned to the PE department, or 
other outstanding fees owed to departments that the student has not 
paid. Students are encouraged to check with the Cashiers Office 
(Student Accounts) if they believe that a hold on their class sche- 
dules could exist. It is the student's responsibility to clear all obliga- 
tions to the University. 

3) Obtain a class schedule and AllCampus Card (see page 15). Class schedules 
will be mailed to the student's Permanent Address approximately one week 
prior to Registration/Change Day. 

Cancellation Policy 

All class schedules not mailed because of a University Hold will be automatically 
cancelled. 



14 



PAYMENT DEADLINES 

First Summer Session and the Ten-Week Session— May 9, 1988 
Second Summer Session — June 20, 1988 

REGISTRATION FOR NON-PREREGISTERED STUDENTS 

All students will report to Reynolds Coliseum with a "Permit to Register." The 
"Permit to Register" may be obtained at the appropriate office according to the 
following categories: 

Contin u ing Degree Students (students who were registered or withdrew during 
the 1988 spring semester)— Report to Room 100, Harris Hall, and request a 
"Permit." 

Re-entering Degree Students (students who previously attended NCSU but 
were not enrolled during the 1988 spring semester) — Report to Room 100, 
Harris Hall, complete a Readmission Application, and obtain a "Permit." 

New Undergraduate Degree Students (never attended NCSU)— Report to the 
Admissions Office, 107 Peele Hall and obtain a "Permit." 

New Graduate Degree Students (never attended NCSU) — Report to the Gradu- 
ate Office, 104 Peele Hall and obtain a "Permit." 

Lifelong Education Students (non-degree) — Report to the Division for Lifelong 
Education, McKimmon Center, complete a Lifelong Education Student Appli- 
cation Form, and obtain a "Permit." 

All students will be admitted to the Coliseum from 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon on 
the Registration dates indicated below: 

First Summer Session and the Ten-Week Session— May 23, 1988 
Second Summer Session — July 5, 1988 

ALLCAMPUS CARDS 

North Carolina State University has implemented a permanent photo I.D./reg- 
istration card program called the AllCampus Card. The AllCampus card is used 
to gain access to various campus activities including: D. H. Hill Library, Clark 
Infirmary, physical education activities, Student Accounts, athletic events, and 
University Dining's meal plan program. The AllCampus card is also the card 
used by Money Card depositors to access their funds at University Dining loca- 
tions, the NCSU Bookstore, the Laundry, Parking Services and Health Services. 

Students continuing their studies during the Summer Sessions will use the 
card they currently possess. New students can have their pictures taken and 
AllCampus cards made on Summer Session Registration/Change days, May 23 
and July 5. at Reynolds Coliseum from 8:30 a.m. -12:00 noon. Photographing of 
new students will take place throughout each session in Room 217 Harris Hall. 

Office hours will be extended until 7:00 p.m. on May 23-24 and July 5-6. 

Lost/stolen AllCampus cards can be replaced any regular business day at 217 
Harris Hall from 8:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. There is a nonrefundable $15.00 service 
charge for this replacement card. 



15 



WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

A regularly enrolled student who finds it necessary to drop all courses will 
initiate withdrawal from the University at the Counseling Center, 200 Harris 
Hall. A Lifelong Education student in the same circumstance initiates withdra- 
wal from the University at the Summer Sessions Office, McKimmon Center, 
Gorman Street and Western Boulevard. A student who withdraws will not have 
any grades recorded. A student who discontinues attending classes without 
officially withdrawing will receive all "NC" grades. 

After a short period (four days) during which it is possible to withdraw with a 
refund of fees (less a registration fee), there is a period during which a student 
may withdraw but without refund. The withdrawal deadline for undergraduates 
(regularly classified and Undergraduate Lifelong Education students) corres- 
ponds to the last day to drop a course at the 400-level or below; for graduate 
students (including Post-Baccalureate students) the deadline for withdrawal 
corresponds to the last day to drop 500- or 600-level courses. (See the appropriate 
Summer Sessions Calendar for dates.) After the published deadlines, there is no 
withdrawal except for unusual circumstances which can be documented as, for 
example, extended illness. Under these circumstances a student may petition the 
Fee Appeals Committee for a prorated refund of tuition and fees. 



SPECIAL NOTES 

1. Tuition and fees are payable by check or cash before or on the day of 
registration. Advanced billing of tuition and fees will be made only for those 
students who preregister. Payment is requested by May 9, 1988 for the First 
Summer Session and Ten-Week Session and June 20, 1988 for the Second 
Summer Session. 

2. Students planning to take courses in both the First and Second Sessions 
should plan their sequences well in advance. Offerings in the Second Session 
are often substantially less in number than in the First Session, and in some 
instances, departments do not offer courses in both summer sessions. 

3. Everything possible will be done to insure that the courses listed in this 
bulletin will be given at the time indicated. However, the Director of Summer 
Sessions reserves the right to cancel courses in which enrollment is deemed 
insufficient. 

4. The maximum load for either session of the Summer Sessions is two courses 
plus a PE course for undergraduates and six hours for graduates. Any 
student may carry less. Regularly enrolled students who desire to carry more 
than seven hours must obtain the approval of the dean of the college or school 
in which they are enrolled. Students visiting from other institutions who 
wish to take more than the maximum must obtain the approval of the 
Director of Summer Sessions. 

5. All Lifelong Education students (including those from other universities and 
colleges) are advised that N CSV degree students are always given priority for 
Summer Sessions classes. Acceptance of the Registration Application for 
Lifelong Education students by the Summer Sessions Office in no way consti- 
tutes a guarantee that class space will be available. 

NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY 

North Carolina State University is dedicated to equality of opportunity within 
its community. Accordingly, North Carolina State University does not practice 

16 



or condone discrimination, in any form, against students, employees, or appli- 
cants on the ground of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or handicap. 
North Carolina State University commits itself to positive action to secure equal 
opportunity regardless of those characteristics. 

North Carolina State University supports the protection available to members 
of its community under all applicable Federal laws, including Titles VI and VII 
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 
Sections 799A and 845 of the Public Health Service Act, the Equal Pay and Age 
Discrimination Acts, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Vietnam Veteran's Read- 
justment Assistance Act of 1974, and Executive Order 11246. For information 
concerning these provisions, contact: 

Dr. Lawrence M. Clark 

Associate Provost and University Affirmative Action Officer 

Box 7101 

North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7101 

Phone: (919) 737-3148 

PLANNING TO GRADUATE. . . . 

If you plan to graduate at the end of the Summer Sessions, there are a number 
of items that should be of interest to you. 

1. You should submit an Application for Degree card for each degree you are 
to receive. This should be turned in to your department within two weeks 
after the beginning of the Session. If for any reason you submitted an 
Application for Degree card last semester, but did not graduate, it is 
necessary that you submit another Application for the Summer Sessions. 
Remember: If you are to receive two degrees, you must submit a separate 
application for each degree. 

2. Your local address and your official University correspondence address 
should be kept up-to-date. Also, the address you show on your Application 
for Degree card will be the address to which your diploma is mailed and 
also the address to which any further correspondence from the University 
will be sent. Any changes should be made by reporting your new address to 
the Department of Registration and Records, 100 Harris Hall, Box 7313, 
Raleigh, NC 27695-7313. 

3. If you are transferring hours from another university in order to graduate, 
this should be done before the end of the Summer Sessions. If you are 
enrolled at another institution and that institution is unable to furnish an 
official transcript by the end of this Session, you must have that university's 
Registrar send to the Department of Registration and Records a letter 
showing the course and grade with an official school seal and Registrar's 
signature. This letter must be received by the end of the Summer Session. 

4. Correspondence course grades must be received, all "incompletes" and 
"late grades" cleared, and all fines and fees paid by the end of the Summer 
Session. 

5. If you are eligible to take reexamination, it must be taken no later than 30 
days after the date of the intended graduation. 



17 



6. If you would like to participate in the May. 1989 commencement exercises, 
contact your Dean's office at your earliest convenience. You will be placed 
on a mailing list to receive all necessary information about the graduation 
activities. Graduation exercises are scheduled for May 6, 1989. 

If you have any questions concerning the above information, please call Loretta 
Massenburg, Supervisor of Records, Department of Registration and Records, 
100 Harris Hall, telephone (919) 737-2572. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

North Carolina State University's grading system for recording academic 
achievement is: 

DEFINITION OF LETTER GRADES AND GRADE POINTS 

Grade Defin it ion Grade Points Per Credit Hour 

A Excellent 4 

B Good 3 

C Satisfactory ("Passing" for graduate 2 

students) 

D Marginal 1 

NC No Credit 

(The following grades are not used in the calculation of grade point averages.) 

S Satisfactory (Credit-only and certain other courses) 

U Unsatisfactory (Credit-only and certain other courses) 

CR Credit by Examination or Advanced Placement 

IN Incomplete 

LA Temporarily Late 

AU Audit 

NR No Recognition Given for Audit 

W Withdrawal or Late Drop 

Questions concerning this grading system should be directed to James H. Bundy, 
University Registrar, NCSU, Box 7313, Raleigh. N.C. 27695-7313. 

EXPENSES 

TUITION AND FEES RATE SCHEDULE-1988 SUMMER SESSIONS 

Undergraduates 

Residents of North Carolina Nonresidents 

Required Required 

Hours Tuition Fees Total Hours Tuition Fees Total 



0-5 


$ 63 


$65 


$128 


0-5 


$ 513 


$65 


$ 578 


6-8 


126 


65 


191 


6-8 


1.027 


65 


1.092 


9-11 


189 


65 


254 


9-11 


1.540 


65 


1.605 


12+ 


252 


65 


317 


12+ 


2,053 


65 


2,118 



18 









Graduate Students 








Residents of North Carolina 




Nonresidents 




Hours 


Tuition 


Required 

Fees 


Total 


Hours 


Tuition 


Required 
Fees 


Total 


0-Thesis 
0-2 
3-5 
6-8 

9+ 


$116 

63 

126 

189 

252 


$ 7 
65 
65 
65 
65 


$123 
128 
191 
254 
317 


0-Thesis $ 366 
0-2 513 
3-5 1,027 
6-8 1,540 
9+ 2,053 


$ 7 
65 
65 
65 
65 


$ 373 

578 

1,092 

1,605 

2,118 






School of Veterinary Medicine 






Residents of North Carolina 




Nonresidents 




Hours 


Tuition 


Required 

Fees 


Total 


Hours 


Tuition 


Required 

Fees 


Total 


0-2 
3-5 
6-8 
9+ 


$141 
281 
422 
562 


$65 
65 
65 
65 


$206 
346 
487 
627 


0-2 
3-5 

6-8 

9+ 


$ 811 
1,622 
2,432 
3,243 


$65 
65 
65 
65 


$ 876 
1,687 
2,497 
3,308 



vak- 



f, 








SPECIAL REGISTRATION AND FEES 

A. Thesis Preparation (GR 598 or GR 698), Dissertation Research (GR 697), 
Examination Only (GR 597), and Summer Research (GR 596S or GR 696S) 
are all charged the O-Thesis rate. 

B. Cooperative Education Fee $130 

C. Audits Rates same as for credit 

Note: The tuition and fees charge is assessed according to the total hours and 
courses carried as of 5:00 p.m. on: 

—Monday, May 30, 1988, for the First Summer Session and Ten-Week Session. 
—Monday, July 11, 1988 for the Second Summer Session. 

* Tuition and fees for the 1988 Summer Sessions are tentative rates and are 
subject to change. 

NOTICES 

1. A statement of tuition and fees is mailed to each preregistered student 
around 20-30 days before the beginning of each Summer Session. The 
statement must be returned with full payment or complete financial assis- 
tance information by May 9, 1988 for the First Summer Session and the 
Ten-Week Session and by June 20, 1988 for the Second Summer Session. 
Nonpreregistered students are required to pay tuition and fees at registra- 
tion. Deferred payments will not be allowed during the Summer Sessions. 

2. Required fees are included in the rates listed above and must be paid by all 
students. Students are entitled to the services, facilities, and programs 
offered by the Student Center, Health Services, Physical Education Depart- 
ment, and Athletics Department. An itemization of required fees will be 
provided upon request. 

3. Upon adding course work that results in an increased fee, students should 
pay at Reynolds Coliseum on Registration/Change Day and at Suite 1105 
Student Services Center thereafter. Refunds resulting from courses 
dropped can be obtained by presenting the official drop form at Suite 1105 
Student Services Center. 

4. All students enrolled in courses designated as requiring student use of 
University, College/School, or Departmental computing resources during 
class or laboratory sessions or as homework assignments will be charged a 
computer course fee of $15 per Summer Session. Similarly, all students 
enrolled in courses designated as requiring student use of University, Col- 
lege/School, or Departmental laboratory resources will be charged a labor- 
atory course fee of $15 per Summer Session. The maximum course fee to be 
charged to any student will be $30 per Summer Session regardless of the 
computer and/or laboratory courses taken. This fee will not be waived when 
a designated lab or computer fee course is dropped after the official enroll- 
ment date. (Official enrollment dates are stated at the end of the following 
listing of designated courses.) 



20 





COURSES REQUIRING COMPUTER OR LABORATORY 








COURSE FEES 












SUMMER SESSIONS, 1988 




ARC 


400 


CSC 
CSC 


202E 
302 


FLS 102 
FLS 201 


MB 


401 


BCH 


554 


CSC 
CSC 


311 
311E 


FLS 201E 


MEA 


110 


BO 


200 


CSC 


312 


FOR 111 


NE 


202 


BO(ZO) 


365 


CSC 


417 


FOR 204 










CSC 


431E 


FOR 261 


PP 


503 


BS 


100 


CSC 


461 


FOR 264 










CSC 


461E 


FOR 274 


PS 


471 


CE 


382 


CSC 


499 


FOR(FW)310 


PY 


205 


CH 


101 


CSE 


452 


FW(FOR)310 


PY 


208 


CH 


103 


CSE 


452E 




PY 


211 


CH 


104 


CSE 


453 


HS 400 


PY 


212 


CH 


107 


CSE 


453E 




PY 


231 


CH 


221 


CSE 


699 


IA 115 






CH 


223 






IA 122 


SOC 


416 


CH 


315 


ECE 


213 


IA 351 






CH 


499 


ECE 
ECE 


214 
301 


IE 361 


ST 


516 


CHE 


205 


ECE 


302 


IE 452 


T 


220 


CHE 


225 






IE 453 


T 


250 






FLF 


101 




T 


301 


CSC 


101E 


FLF 


101E 


LAR 698 






CSC 


102 


FLF 


102 




VD 


400 


CSC 


102E 


FLF 


102E 


MAE 305 






CSC 


111 






MAE 306 


WPS 


205 


CSC 


200X 


FLG 


101 








CSC 


200Y 


FLG 


102 


MAT 200 


zo 


201 


CSC 


201 






MAT 210 


zo 


305 


CSC 


201E 


FLS 


101 




ZO(BO) 


365 


**Course fees wi 


1 be assessed for courses officially a 


irried at 5:00 p.m. on 


Monday, May 30 


for the ] 


7 irst and Ten-Week Sessions 


; Monday, July 11 for 


the Second Sessic 


HI.** 









RESIDENCE STATUS CLASSIFICATION FOR TUITION PURPOSES 

To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes, a person must have established 
legal residence (domicile) in North Carolina and maintained that legal residence 
for at least twelve months immediately prior to his or her classification as a 
resident for tuition purposes. To be eligible for classification as a resident for 
tuition purposes a person must establish that his or her presence in the State is, 
and during the requisite twelve month qualifying period was, for purposes of 
maintaining a bona fide domicile rather than of maintaining a mere temporary 
residence or abode incident to enrollment in an institution of higher education. 



21 



North Carolina General Statute (G. S.) 1 16-143. 1 is the governing law concern- 
ing resident status classification and sets forth statutory definitions, rules and 
special provisions for determining resident status for tuition purposes. Copies of 
the law and implementing regulations are found in A Manual to Assist the Public 
Higher Education Institutions of North Carolina in the Matter of Student Resi- 
dence Classification for Tuition Purposes which is available for inspection in the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 112 Peele Hall. Special situations concern- 
ing minors, the military, and marriage as they relate to residence status classifi- 
cation are addressed in The Manual. It is the student's responsibility to initiate a 
review of their situation when classification or re-classification as a resident for 
tuition purposes is sought. 

Active military personnel assigned to North Carolina and their military 
dependents may be eligible to receive the benefit of the in-state tuition rate under 
G.S. 116-143.3. A student who qualifies for the in-state tuition rate under this 
statute is not considered a resident, but merely eligible for the benefit of the 
in-state tuition rate. Application for eligibility to be charged the in-state tuition 
rate under G.S. 116-143.3 must be made prior to initial enrollment or re- 
enrollment for which the student claims the benefit. Further application for such 
eligibility must similarly be made prior to the outset of each successive academic 
year of enrollment. 

Questions concerning residence status classification should be addressed to the 
Director of Undergraduate Admissions, North Carolina State Universitv, Box 
7103, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7103, (919) 737-2434 

REFUND OF TUITION AND FEES 

A student who withdraws from school on or before May 30 for the First and 
Ten-Week Sessions or July 11 for the Second Session will receive a refund of the 
full amount paid, less a $15 registration fee. After the dates specified, no refunds 
will be made. 

In some instances, circumstances justify waiving rules regarding refunds. An 
example might be withdrawal from the University because of illness. Students 
have the privilege of appeal to the Fee Appeals Committee when they feel special 
consideration is merited. Application for such appeals may be secured from the 
Department of Registration and Records (100 Harris Hall), Summer Sessions 
Office (McKimmon Center), or University Cashier's Office (Suite 1105 Student 
Services Center). 

FINANCIAL AID 

The financial aid available to regular students attending the Summer Sessions 
is ordinarily limited to loans and work-study jobs. Students who wish to be 
considered for financial aid should make application to the Financial Aid Office 
as far in advance as possible, preferably no later than March 31. Summer 
applications will be available in early March. 

The University has no financial aid for summer visitor students. However, 
these students may have access to the part-time job listings on the bulletin board 
outside the Financial Aid Office, 2005 Harris Hall. 

COUNSELING CENTER 

The Counseling Center provides services designed to assist individuals in 
gaining a better understanding of themselves and their opportunities. Psycholo- 

22 




gists, professional counselors, and psychiatrists are available to evaluate and to 
work with students who have concerns such as: choosing a career; academic 
planning; identifying and overcoming educational difficulties; developing 
greater self-understanding; drug and alcohol problems; developing more satisfy- 
ing personal relations; and coping with stress or emotional crisis. All counseling 
is strictly confidential. 

In addition to one-to-one and group counseling for individuals and couples, 
workshops are offered throughout the year in a variety of areas, including 
vocational exploration, test anxiety-reduction, and assertive behavior. 

Counseling services are available without cost to all enrolled NCSU students, 
and some services are available to prospective students. Appointments may be 
scheduled over the telephone by calling 737-2424 or in person by coming to 200 
Harris Hall. Some evening appointments are available, and a counselor is on call 
24 hours a day through Health Services, 737-2563. 

HOUSING 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

During the 1988 Summer Sessions, housing will be provided in the residence 
halls on a first-come, first-served basis for men and women who are enrolled for 
one or more courses. 

Assignment to a room for a Summer Session does not guarantee that a room 
will be available for the Fall Semester. A student must be accepted by NCSU for 
Fall enrollment as a full-time student to be eligible to apply for University 
housing. 



23 



ROOM RENTALS AND APPLICATIONS 

The rental rate for a five-week Session is $160.00 per person in a double room on 
main campus. If space is available, a single room may be reserved for $220.00 
each Session. Watauga Hall (air-conditioned) is primarily for graduate students 
(juniors and seniors on space available basis). The rental rate is $255.00 for a 
double room and $280.00 for a single room. Contact the Housing Assignments 
Office in Suite 1112J Student Services Center or telephone 737-2440 for further 
housing reservation information. 

Residents will be permitted to change rooms after the first week of classes with 
the approval of the Housing Assignments Office. The room change fee is $5.00. 
Opening days of the residence halls will be as follows: 

FIRST SESSION-Noon, Sunday, May 22, 1988 
SECOND SESSION-Noon, Tuesday, July 5, 1988 

HOUSING REFUND POLICY 

Cancellation of a room reservation must be made in writing as follows: 

(a) In person at the Housing Assignments Office in Suite 1112J, Student 
Services Center, Monday through Friday, between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., 
on the cancellation form provided; or 

(b) By mail addressed to the Housing Assignments Office, Box 7315, NCSU, 
Raleigh, N.C., 27695-7315. 

The effective date of cancellation is the date notification is received at the 
Housing Assignments Office or the date the room is vacated, whichever is later. 
Residents who have moved out of their rooms must return their Check-Out Card 
to the Housing Assignments Office to avoid a charge for an improper check-out. 

If the housing agreement is cancelled on or before Registration/Change Day, 
the rental fee paid will be refunded less a $25 processing fee. // the housing 
agreement is cancelled AFTER 5:00 p.m. on Registration/ Change Day, NO 
REFUND of room rent will be made. In cases of medical withdrawals, however, a 
$25 processing fee will be charged plus a daily charge from date of occupancy. 

If a student fails to check in and secure his/her keys by 5:00 p.m. on Registrati- 
on/Change Day, the housing agreement will be cancelled and NO REFUND will 
be made except as stated above. 

STUDENT FAMILY HOUSING 

The University operates E.S. King Village as an apartment complex for stu- 
dents with families. This complex consists of 300 apartments (120 efficiency, 148 
one-bedroom, and 32 two-bedroom). Interested students should write to Student 
Family Housing, NCSU, Box 7315, Raleigh, N.C., 27695-7315, for family housing 
applications and information. 

FRATERNITY HOUSES 

Several of the 20 fraternity houses located on or adjacent to the campus provide 
housing for Summer Sessions students. Twelve of the 20 houses are fully air- 
conditioned and all provide furnished rooms and living areas. In addition, some 
houses offer board plans during the summer months. Any student interested in 
further details should write to the Office of Student Development, Box 7314, 
NCSU, Raleigh, N.C., 27695-7314 or telephone (919) 737-2441. 

24 



D. H. HILL LIBRARY 

The libraries of North Carolina State University contain more than 1,200,000 
volumes of books and bound journals, 620,000 federal government publications, 
and 2,500,000 microforms. The collection is especially strong in the physical and 
biological sciences, agriculture, textiles, architecture and design. The D. H. Hill 
Library houses the vast majority of these publications and subscribes to over 
9,400 periodicals. Five branch libraries — the College of Textiles Library in 
Nelson Hall, the Design School Library in Brooks Hall, the College of Forest 
Resources Library in Biltmore Hall, Veterinary Medical Library in the College 
of Veterinary Medicine, and the Curriculum Materials Center in Poe Hall — serve 
the special needs of their colleges/schools. 

The D. H.Hill Library has been a depository for U. S. government publications 
since 1924 and receives over 97% of these publications. The library also receives 
the microfiche research reports published by the Department of Energy (DOE), 
the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA), the Educational 
Resources Information Center (ERIC), and the National Technical Information 
Service (NTIS). 

On-line computer-based literature searching is offered by the library from a 
number of data bases such as ERIC, AGRICOLA (Bibliography of Agriculture), 
Psychological Abstracts, Sociological Abstracts, BIOSIS (Biological Abstracts), 
and Nuclear Science Abstracts. Only direct costs are charged to the user. 

Facilities and equipment are also available for both individual and group use of 
audiovisual media. The library's theater can be scheduled for group media 
presentations, and films in the State Library's film collection can be borrowed by 
the D. H. Hill Library's Media Center for academic use by faculty and students. 







The scholar, student, and browser will each discover the materials and services 
of the library to be useful and enjoyable additions to his or her Summer Sessions 
program. All areas of the library complex are air-conditioned and open to stu- 
dents and faculty. 

Library hours for the Summer Sessions are as follows: 

Monday-Thursday 7:45 a.m. -12:00 midnight 

Friday 7:45 a.m.- 9:30 p.m. 

Saturday 9:30 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. 

Sunday 1:00 p.m.-12:00 midnight 

SUMMER ACTIVITIES 

Through many curricular and extracurricular activities, the Summer Ses- 
sions provide special opportunities to those students engaged in summer study. 
Interesting, informative and entertaining programs and activities are scheduled 
for each session. 

A few of the more popular activities and special features include the Car- 
michael Gym athletic and recreation programs and the varied activities spon- 
sored by the University Student Center. 

The University's regular program of student personnel services is available to 
summer students. It includes the Counseling Center for educational, career and 
personal counseling; the Career Planning and Placement Center for career plan- 
ning and placement; the Residence Life and Residence Facilities offices for 
residence quarters; the Financial Aid Office for financial assistance; and the 
Student Health Service for medical care. 

Beyond the campus, the city of Raleigh offers cultural and recreational oppor- 
tunities of interest to students. The Raleigh Little Theater presents several 
productions during the summer, the North Carolina Museum of Art sponsors 
gallery concerts and exhibits, and there are several swimming pools and city and 
state parks located in and around Raleigh. 

UNIVERSITY STUDENT CENTER 

The hub of campus summer activity is the University Student Center. The 
Center is supported in part by student fees, and all Summer Sessions students are 
invited to attend the programs and activities sponsored by the Summer Pro- 
grams Board. These programs include movies and a variety of social and recrea- 
tional events. 

The air-conditioned Center offers many facilities, including a television 
lounge, an art gallery, offices for student organizations, a game room, snack bar, 
theater and meeting rooms. The Craft Center in the Thompson Building has a full 
range of crafts programs. 

University Student Center hours during the summer are: 

Monday-Friday 7:00 a.m. -11:00 p.m. 

Saturday-Sunday 9:00 a.m. -11:00 p.m. 



26 



SPECIAL COURSES 
AND INSTITUTES 

NCSU MIDDLE SCHOOL WORKSHOP-ALTERNATIVES FOR THE 
MIDDLE YEARS" 
(Listed as ED 598-F) 
June 20-July 1 

This ninth annual activity-oriented workshop is designed to help teachers and 
administrators develop humane and imaginative programs for students ages 
10-15. It will focus upon (a) the developmental needs, interests, and abilities of 
emerging adolescents; (b) curriculum ideas and teaching methods; and (c) school 
organization strategies. 

Participants will be involved in whole group activities and mini-courses which 
explore topics such as: 

Adolescence and contemporary society 

Team organization 

Advisor/advisee programs 

Learning styles 

Interdisciplinary inquiry 

Arts and the adolescent 

Learning environment/classroom design 

Creativity and the right side of the brain 

Competition and cooperation 

Case studies of outstanding schools 

Outdoor education 

Adolescent sexuality 

Moral development and values clarification 

Adolescence and authority 

Cognitive and social development in adolescence 

All school activities 

Learning games and simulations 

The principal as educational leader 

In addition, special electives will be offered in math, science, language arts, 
and social studies. 

Emphasis in most sessions will be placed on activity, involvement and sharing. 
Films, slides, simulations, small group discussions, working with classroom 
materials, and a variety of other learning techniques will be utilized. 

The workshop will be directed by John Arnold, Coordinator of Middle Years 
Education at NCSU, and Chris Stevenson, Curriculum Specialist, University of 
Vermont. Consultants from the State Department of Public Instruction and from 
area schools will serve on a part-time basis. 

Sessions will meet Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Three 
graduate credits will be granted to those who participate satisfactorily and 
complete a curriculum project. Also, 5.5 CEU credits will be awarded by the 
State Department of Public Instruction. 

Dormitory rooms (for approximately $15 per night per person, double occu- 
pancy), will be available for out-of-town participants. Rooms may be reserved by 
contacting the Housing Assignments Office, NCSU, Box 7315, Raleigh, NC 
27695-7315. 

To register, contact Dr. John Arnold, Department of Curriculum and 
Instruction, NCSU, Box 7801, Raleigh, NC 27695-7801, for special registra- 
tion forms. Or, you may call (919)737-3221 and request forms from the 
secretary. Registration must be completed no later than May 23, 1988. 

27 



REGIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL FOR ADULT, EXTENSION, AND 
COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATORS 
June 6-June 24, 1988 

The Department of Adult and Community College Education offers a special 
three-week program of instruction designed to provide graduate study and pro- 
fessional improvement opportunities for educators. This intensive session assists 
extension workers, community college instructors, administrators, and other 
adults to increase their understanding of topics such as current issues in com- 
munity colleges, use of microcomputers, designing and producing educational 
materials, and coping with decline. It also offers opportunities for keeping up-to- 
date in areas of agricultural and home economics technology. 

The program is interdisciplinary; it enlists the professional competence of 
visiting and resident faculty. Courses meet daily in block schedule for morning 
and afternoon. Each participant may take a maximum of six semester hours. 

Students enrolling for the special three-week session will complete registration 
by mail. In order to register for the 1988 Regional Summer School, students must 
complete the application form and submit the tuition by May 23, 1988. The form 
mav be obtained from Bernadette G. Watts, Department of Adult and Commun- 
ity College Education, NCSU, Box 7607, Raleigh. NC 27695-7607. 

Course offerings are listed below: 
ANS 500 Advanced Ruminant Nutrition 
CS 591G Crop Stress Relations 
EB 403 Economics of Consumer Decisions 
EB 433 U. S. Agricultural Policy 

ED 596C Instructional Leadership in the Community College 
ED 596D Extension Education Methods 
ED 5961 Emerging Issues in Adult Education 
ED 596J Leading and Working with People 
ED 596K Developing Supervisory Skills 
ED 596M Improving Administrative Skills 
ED 696 Leadership Strategies 

HS 595A Production Maintenance and Marketing of Quality Horticultural Crops 
PP 595A Plant Diseases— Principles, Diagnoses and Management 
SSC 560 Advanced Soil Management 

INSTITUTE FOR TEACHERS OF GIFTED AND TALENTED 
June 20-July 10 

This institute will consist of two courses: 

ED 598-1 Special Problems in Curriculum and Instruction: Intelligence 

& 
ED 598-J Special Problems in Curriculum and Instruction: Counseling the 
Gifted Individual 

Registration for this three-week workshop must be completed during the 
regularly scheduled Preregistration and Registration times for the Univer- 
sity's Second Summer Session. For further information, contact: Dr. Lyn 
Aubrecht, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, NCSU, Box 7801, 
Raleigh, NC 27695-7801. Phone (919) 737-3221. 



28 



SPECIAL WORKSHOPS FOR MATHEMATICS AND 
SCIENCE TEACHERS 

North Carolina State University's Center for Research in Mathematics and 
Science Education (CRMSE) will offer five workshops during the summer of 
1988. Tuition, stipends and materials will be furnished to participating teachers. 

These workshops are not included in the Summer Sessions Program described 
in this catalog. Special registration procedures are required. To apply, contact 
Dr. Sarah B. Berenson, Center for Research in Mathematics and Science 
Education, NCSU, Box 7801, Raleigh, NC 27695-7801 (telephone: 919/737- 
2013) for special application forms. APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 
APRIL 16, 1988. 

• NSF WORKSHOP FOR HIGH SCHOOL MATHEMATICS TEACH- 
ERS— "Tool Software and the Impact on the High School Mathematics 
Curriculum" 

This National Science Foundation workshop is planned to update high school 
mathematics teachers' knowledge and skills in the use of computer tools that 
manipulate symbols, perform calculations, plot functions, and draw geometric 
constructions. The two main components of the workshop are to become familiar 
with operating the software and how to use the software to improve instruction. 

Teachers will develop instructional materials for one class using a tool of their 
choice. Emphasis in most sessions will be placed on hands-on learning, sharing, 
and cooperation in a computer laboratory setting. Materials for teachers to use as 
demonstration lessons and laboratory lessons and some public domain software 
will be given to teachers attending. 
Schedule: 8:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m., weekdays— June 20-July 1 
Credit: Two semester hours graduate credit 
Instructor: CRMSE Staff 

• TITLE II WORKSHOP FOR HIGH SCHOOL ADVANCED ALGEBRA 
AND ADVANCED MATHEMATICS TEACHERS-'Problems, Solutions, 
and Strategies for High School Advanced Mathematics (PS 2 )" 

This workshop will provide high school teachers of Advanced Algebra and 
Advanced Mathematics an opportunity to: enhance their problem-solving skills, 
improve the way they teach their students to solve problems, and learn how to 
generate non-routine, real-world problems. The class format will encourage 
cooperation and sharing of ideas. The last week will be spent developing prob- 
lems and solutions which will be published and distributed to high school 
teachers across the State. 
Schedule: 4:00-7:00 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday— May 24-June 17; and 

all day, Monday through Friday— June 20-June 30 
Credit: Six semester hours graduate credit 
Instructor: Dr. William Waters 

• SUMMER INSTITUTE FOR MIDDLE GRADES MATH TEACHERS 
-"LOGO and BASIC as Mathematics Tools" 

This Mathematics Summer Institute, supported in part by the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction and the Mathematics and Science Education Net- 
work, is designed for Middle School mathematics teachers who have had little or 
no computer programming in LOGO and BASIC. The emphasis is to integrate 

29 



the use of these languages into the middle school math curriculum, especially in 
the areas of Informal Geometry. Number Theory, and Probability. The instruc- 
tional approach will be hands-on with the computer and concrete materials that 
will enhance instruction. 

Schedule: 8:00 a.m. -12:00 noon, weekdays— July 23-August 3 
Credit: Two semester hours graduate credit 
Instructor: Dr. Sarah Berenson 

• SUMMER INSTITUTE FOR MIDDLE GRADES SCIENCE TEACH- 
ERS — "Physical Science for Middle Grades Teachers" 

This Science Summer Institute, supported in part by the State Department of 
Public Instruction and the Mathematics and Science Education Network, is 
designed for Middle School science teachers who wish to improve their under- 
standing of physic concepts taught in the middle grades. Through lectures, 
discussion, and appropriate activities, teachers will deepen their understanding 
of science concepts and learn how to increase their pupils' interest in and under- 
standing of physical science. 

Schedule: 8:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m., weekdays— July 5-July 18 
Credit: Three semester hours graduate credit 
Instructor: CRMSE Staff 

• SUMMER INSTITUTE FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS OF 
GRADES 4-6 — "Measurement and Arithmetic for Upper Elementary 
Teachers" 

This course will assist teachers in using concrete materials to teach whole 
number, fraction, and decimal algorithms to their students. It will also develop 
the theory of measurement and present the measurement concepts that elemen- 
tary students should understand before pre-Algebra. The instruction will be 
presented in a hands-on format with teachers working cooperatively in a labora- 
tory setting. 

Schedule: 8:00 a.m.-12:00 noon, weekdays— July 5-July 18 
Credit: Two semester hours graduate credit 
Instructor: Dr. John R. Kolb 

TEACHING OF WRITING INSTITUTE 
(Listed as ED 598-D) 
June 27-July 26 

The Capital Area Writing Project (C AWP) at N. C. State University is modeled 
after the highly successful National Writing Project and is one of eight sites of the 
North Carolina Writing Project network. 

Experienced elementary and secondary teachers of English and other content 
areas are eligible for the 25 Fellowships available. Applicants should have a 
marked interest in improving effectiveness in teaching writing and in sharing 
new knowledge with their colleagues. Participants will agree to conduct inser- 
vice programs as Teacher/Consultants within the Region. Applicants from pri- 
vate schools and colleges within Region Three can be considered only if public 
school applicants do not fill available openings. Application deadline is March 31, 
1988. 

Fellows will receive (at no cost) six hours of graduate credit from NCSU in the 
teaching of writing, a $400 stipend, and a text of numerous writing activities and 
successful teaching strategies developed during the four weeks of the project. 

30 



Workshop sessions will be held five days per week, Monday through Friday. 
Mornings will be spent in journal writing, group response and editing. Because of 
the intensive nature of the workshop and occasional evening activities, dormitory 
residence during the week is recommended, though not required. Participants 
will be expected to attend an all-day orientation on Saturday, June 11. 

Registration for this Institute must be completed during the regularly 
scheduled Preregistration and Registration times for the University's 
Second Summer Session. For further information about the Capital Area 
Writing Project at NCSU, please contact either Dr. Ruie Pritchard (NCSU) 
at (919) 737-3221 or Dr. Sally Buckner (Peace College) at (919) 832-2881. 

HIGHLANDS BIOLOGICAL STATION 

The Highlands Biological Station is a regional field station for biological 
research and education in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. Its facilities are 
available for use by qualified scientists and graduate students who are engaged 
in research on the biota and environments of the Southern Appalachian region. 
The Station is an interinstitutional facility of the University of North Carolina. It 
is administered by Western Carolina University, located in nearby Cullowhee, a 
constituent institution of the University of North Carolina. Responsibility for the 
Station's programs is held by a nine-member Board of Directors that includes 
representatives from the biology faculties of several southeastern universities. 
Twenty-one colleges and universities support the Station through institutional 
memberships. The USDA Forest Service is a cooperating agency. 

The Station offers several courses each summer at the advanced under- 
graduate-graduate level dealing with the special biological features of the south- 
ern Appalachians and with areas of study that are appropriate for investigation 
at a mountain field station. Students have the option of receiving credit for 
courses through either Western Carolina University or UNC-Chapel Hill. The 
following courses are being offered in 1988: 

Amphibian Larval Biology. June 6-17. Three semester hours. Team taught by 
Drs. Richard Wassersug (Dalhousie University), H. Bradley Shaffer (University 
of California, Davis), and James Hanken (University of Colorado). This is a 
lecture, laboratory, and field course addressing a variety of topics on the biology 
of amphibian larvae. Among the topics to be covered are: the identification of 
local larvae, the evolution of complex life cycles and metamorphosis, and the 
feeding behavior of tadpoles and salamander larvae. Assorted aspects of the 
morphology, ecology, behavior, and population genetics of amphibian larvae that 
reflect the special interests and expertise of the instructors will be emphasized. 
Students will conduct individual 2% day projects of their own design and execu- 
tion. Prerequisite: General Zoology. 

Forestry and Wildlife Concepts for Biologists. June 20-25. Two semester hours. 
Dr. Stephen G. Boyce (Duke). A field study of how biological knowledge is used to 
manage forests for enhanced biological diversity, game, timber, recreation, wil- 
derness, and other values. Current resource management practices and the 
biological effects of these practices are examined on both public and private 
lands. Trips include: forests recently harvested and regenerated, forest cultured 
for game and nongame habitats, a tree nursery, forest cultured for recreation, a 
wilderness, and a fish hatchery for producing game and endangered fish. Man- 
agers and biologists explain current forestry and wildlife concepts. Each student 
participates in daily seminars on the biological significance of the findings and on 
opportunities for research to support management concepts. Prerequisites: Uni- 
versity training in biology and ecology, or permission of the instructor. 

31 



Flora of the Southern Blue Ridge. July 4-15. Three semester hours. Dr. J. R. 
Massey (UXC-Chapel Hill). A survey of the ferns, gymnosperms. and flowering 
plants characteristic of the southern Blue Ridge Mountains. This two-week 
intensive field course will involve the identification, recognition, and characteri- 
zation of local plants. Most days will be spent studying and collecting in the field, 
with lectures and discussions in the evening. Prerequisite: General Botany. 

Biology of Spiders. July 18-29. Three semester hours. Team taught by Drs. 
Fred A. Coyle (Western Carolina University) and William A. Shear (Hampden- 
Sydney College). This course will focus on all aspects of the biology of spiders. 
Lectures and discussions will be held daily, in the mornings and or evenings. 
Discussions will be based on recent research articles. Afternoons will be devoted 
to field work. The main objective of the field work will be the assemblage of a 
significant collection of the local spider fauna, which is extraordinarily rich: in 
the course of collecting attention will inevitably be drawn to ecology and behav- 
ior. Most evenings will be available for students to work on identification. Pre- 
requisite: General Zoology. 

Scientific Illustration. July 10-16. Two semester hours. George Venable 
(Smithsonian Institution) and Lewis Sadler (University of Illinois at Chicago). 
An intensive course in basic through advanced techniques for rendering plant 
and animal specimens. This course makes widespread use of the biological 
resources of the Highlands region. The course is designed for both field biologists 
and artists. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Photography for the Field Biologist. July 18-23. Two semester hours. Gilbert 
Leebrick (Appalachian Environmental Arts Center ) and A. Murray Evans ( L'ni- 
versity of Tennessee ). A course designed for the amateur or professional biologist 
covering both field and laboratory applications. Photographic equipment, tech- 
niques, software, close-up work, laboratory still-lifes. composition, and design 
will be covered, all in the context of the southern Appalachian flora and fauna. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Registration fees: Western Carolina University. $15 application fee and $40 
registration fee. UXC-Chapel Hill. $50 registration fee. 

Tuition: $65 semester hour 

Housing: $25-$35 week 

The Highlands Biological Foundation. Inc. offers limited financial aid to quali- 
fied students. Further information on specific courses, financial aid. and applica- 
tion forms can be obtained by writing the Executive Director. Highlands Bio- 
logical Station. P.O. Drawer 580. Highlands. North Carolina 28741 or by contact- 
ing Dr. A. W. Cooper. Department of Forestrv. X. C. State Universitv. Telephone 
(919) 737-2891. 

EVENING SUMMER SESSIONS 

Late afternoon and evening classes are scheduled during the First Session 
(May 23-June 28). Second Session (July 5- August 10). and the Ten-Week Session 
(May 23-August 10) for the convenience of Evening Degree students. Lifelong 
Education students and "traditional" day students who have summer jobs but 
who would like to remain academically active. Many of the evening courses 
offered in the 1988 Summer Sessions may be used toward fulfilling the basic 
requirements for a B.A. degree from the College of Humanities and Social 
Sciences. 

The following departments are offering late afternoon and evening classes 
during the 1988 Summer Sessions: Accounting. Adult and Community College 
Education. Anthropology, Computer Science. Computer Studies. Counselor 

32 



Education, Curriculum and Instruction, Economics and Business, English, 
Electrical and Computer Engineering, French, Health Occupations, Industrial 
Arts, Mathematics, Occupational Education, Physical Education, Political 
Science, Public Administration, Social Work, Sociology, Spanish, and Zoology. 
Please refer to the Course Listings beginning on page 116 for specific details. 

For information concerning the evening degree and certificate programs in 
the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, contact Ms. Lynda Hambourger, 
Coordinator of Evening Programs, Room 106 Caldwell Building, or call (919) 
737-2467. Ms. Hambourger's office is open until 7:30 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday and until 5:00 p.m. Fridays. 

SUMMER INSTITUTE IN ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER 

LANGUAGES 

June 27-July 30 

The Summer Institute in English for Speakers of Other Languages at North 
Carolina State University is a five-week, noncredit course of study of the English 
language and American culture. It is designed for individuals from other coun- 
tries who intend to pursue university studies or specialized training programs in 
the United States. With an emphasis on developing competence in all aspects of 
English language usage, the program includes classroom instruction, use of 
language laboratories, and extensive opportunities for practicing English in 
actual communication situations. In addition, opportunities are available for 
students to become acquainted with life in the U.S. with weekend trips to places 
of historic, artistic and scenic interest. 

Any student who has a score of 400 on the TOE FL (Test of English as a Foreign 
Language) or an equivalent facility in the use of spoken English may attend the 
Institute. (Information about taking the test at one of the centers located in the 
students' home countries may be obtained by writing to: Test of English as a 
Foreign Language, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey.) 

Admission to the Institute does not imply admission as a degree candidate at 
North Carolina State University or any other campus of The University of North 
Carolina. 

The Institute, which is sponsored by the Division for Lifelong Education in 
cooperation with the Summer Sessions and the Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages and Literatures, is under the direction of Mrs. Claire A. Drehmel of the 
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. All classroom work is con- 
ducted on the campus. Classes, including language laboratory practice sessions, 
are held six hours a day, Monday through Friday, from 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 
and 1:30 p.m. to 3:10 p.m. (Attendance at the Institute does not carry academic 
credit, although students who complete the program receive a certificate of 
attendance.) 

The total cost of the five-week program is approximately $1,775. The cost of the 
Institute is estimated on the basis of campus dormitory accommodations and 
meals at the campus cafeterias. Incidental expenses, such as laundry, dry clean- 
ing, entertainment, etc., are not included. (Room rent includes sheets and towels.) 

Course and Books/Materials Fees $775.00 

Room in Campus Dormitory (Estimated) $500.00 

Food (Estimated) $500.00 

For further information about the Institute, write to Nancy E. Polk or Gwen 
Hobby, Division for Lifelong Education, NCSU, Box 7401, Raleigh, North Caro- 
lina 27695-7401. Telephone (919) 737-2265. 

33 



INDEPENDENT STUDY BY EXTENSION 

In addition to the classes listed in this schedule, many undergraduate courses 
are available through independent study (correspondence instruction). This pro- 
gram allows students to enroll at any time, to work at their own pace, and to take 
up to thirteen months to complete a course. For further information about 
independent study, including a complete listing of courses, contact Independent 
Studv by Extension, 201 Abernethy Hall 002A. University of North Carolina, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514. Telephone (919) 962-1106. 



7t\ 



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k^*?M 



COURSE LISTINGS 



Courses are listed by department, departmental abbreviation and numerical 
designator. Semester hour credits for each course are given following the name of 
the course. Classes meet daily, Monday through Friday, except where specified to 
the contrary. The symbols "LR", "LB" and "PR" before the clock hours refer to 
"lecture-recitation," "laboratory" and "problem-solving session," respectively. If 
there is no symbol before the clock hours, lecture-recitation is implied. 

The number in parentheses to the right of the class meeting time is the "Call 
Number." This number must be indicated on the Preregistration Schedule 
Request Form by students who are preregistering for Summer Sessions courses. 

The "$" symbol beside the departmental abbreviation and course number 
indicates that the course has been designated as requiring student use of Univer- 
sity, College/School or Departmental laboratory or computing resources. Stu- 
dents enrolling in each course so designated will be charged at $15.00 labora- 
tory/computer course fee. 

Courses numbered from one through 99 are preparatory courses carrying no 
college credit; courses in the 100, 200, 300 and 400 series are primarily designed 
for undergraduates; courses in the 500 series for graduates and advanced under- 
graduates; and courses in the 600 series for graduates only. Consent of the 
department is required to register for all practicum and individual special topics 
or special problems courses as well as internships and thesis or dissertation 
research. 

All courses are subject to cancellation by the Director of Summer Sessions 
if there is inadequate enrollment. 

Waiver of prerequisites is at the discretion of the instructor. 

Please note that class meeting times in this bulletin are indicated in interna- 
tional time which is measured in hours numbered to 24 instead of 12. 



If the schedule The beginning 

shows the class hour in terms of a 

beginning at: 12-hour clock is: 

0800 8:00 a.m. 

0900 9:00 a.m. 

1000 10:00 a.m. 

1100 11:00 a.m. 

1200 12:00 noon 

1300 1:00 p.m. 

1400 2:00 p.m. 

1500 3:00 p.m. 




If the schedule The beginning 
shows the class hour in terms of a 

beginning at: 12-hour clock is: 

1600 4:00 p.m. 

1700 5:00 p.m. 

1800 6:00 p.m. 

1900 7:00 p.m. 

2000 8:00 p.m. 

2100 9:00 p.m. 

2200 10:00 p.m. 



37 



SPECIAL GRADUATE CATEGORIES 
FIRST SESSION AND SECOND SESSION 



GR 596S MR Summer Research 

GR 597 Master's Exam Only 

GR 598 MR Thesis Preparation 

GR 696S DR Summer Research 

GR 697 Dissertation Research 

GR 698 DR Thesis Preparation 



FIRST SESSION 



(046-596-001) 
(046-597-001)0 
(046-598-001) 
(046-696-001) 
(046-697-001) 
(046-698-001) 



Accounting 



ACC 210 Accounting I— Concepts of Financial Reporting 

0800-0930(004-210-001) 
0800-0930(004-210-002) 
0950-1120(004-210-003) 
1140-1310(004-210-004) 

ACC 220 Accounting II— An Introduction to Managerial Accounting 

Prerequisite: ACC 210 

0950-1120(004-220-001) 

1140-1310(004-220-002) 

ACC 310 Intermediate Financial Accounting I 

Prerequisite: ACC 220 
0950-1120(004-310-001) 

ACC 330 An Introduction to Income Taxation 

Prerequisites: ACC 210 and EB 201 
0800-0930 (004-330-001) 
0950-1120(004-330-002) 

ACC 410 Advanced Financial Accounting 

Prerequisite: ACC 311 
0800-0930 (004-410-001) 

ACC 450 Auditing Financial Information 

Prerequisites: ACC 311, EB(ST) 350 
0950-1120(004-450-001) 

ACC 498 Independent Study in Accounting 

Hours arranged (004-498-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

ACC 210 Accounting I— Concepts of Financial Reporting 

0800-0930(004-210-001) 
0950-1120(004-210-002) 



-An Introduction to Managerial Accounting 



ACC 220 Accounting II 

Prerequisite: ACC 210 
0800-0930 (004-220-001) 
0950-1120(004-220-002) 

ACC 311 Intermediate Financial Accounting II 

Prerequisite: ACC 310 

1140-1310(004-311-001) 

0950-1120(004-311-002) 



Rockness 

Bartley 

Bartlev 

Staff 



Staff 
McKee 



Rockness 
3 

Peace 
Peace 

3 

Frazier 
3 

McKee 

1-6 

Staff 



3 

Staff 
Staff 



Williams 
Williams 



Staff 
Staff 



38 



ACC 320 Managerial Uses of Cost Data 3 

Prerequisite: ACC 220 

0950-1120(004-320-001) Zuckerman 

ACC 420 Production Cost Analysis and Control 3 

Prerequisites: ACC 320 and EB (ST) 350 

0800-0930 (004-420-001) Zuckerman 

ACC 460 Specialized Financial Reporting Theory and Practice 3 

Prerequisite: ACC 311 

1140-1310(004-460-001) Staff 

ACC 498 Independent Study in Accounting 1-6 

Hours arranged (004-498-001) Staff 

TEN-WEEK SESSION 

ACC 210E Accounting I — Concepts of Financial Reporting 3 

1745-1930 TuTh (004-210-051) Brooks 

ACC 220E Accounting II— An Introduction to Managerial Accounting 3 

Prerequisite: ACC 210 

1945-2130 TuTh (004-220-051) Staff 

Agriculture and Life Sciences 
FIRST SESSION 

ALS 499H Honors Research 1-3 

For junior and senior students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences who have a 

GPA of 3.0 or better. Participation is by invitation. 

Hours arranged (006-499-001) Craig 

SECOND SESSION 

ALS 499H Honors Research 1-3 

For junior and senior students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences who have a 

GPA of 3.0 or better. Participation is by invitation. 

Hours arranged (006-499-001) Craig 

Animal Science 

FIRST SESSION 

ANS 590 Topical Problems in Animal Science Maximum 6 

Hours arranged (010-590-001) Cornwell 

ANS 699 Research in Animal Science Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (010-699-001) Lassiter 

SECOND SESSION 

ANS (FS, NTR) 301 Modern Nutrition 3 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Food Science maiors may use as a free elective only. 

0950-1120(010-301-001) Ash 

ANS 590 Topical Problems in Animal Science Maximum 6 

Hours arranged (010-590-001) Cornwell 

ANS 699 Research in Animal Science Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (010-699-001) Lassiter 



39 



ADULT EDUCATION SESSION 

* ANS 500 Advanced Ruminant Nutrition 3 

Prerequisite: ANS 204 or ANS 415 Pond/Crickenberger/Whitlow 

0900-1200 

June 6-June 24— Three-Week Course— Final Exam June 24 

Anthropology 

FIRST SESSION 

ANT 251 Physical Anthropology 3 

1140-1310(012-251-001) Rovner 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology 3 

0800-0930 (012-252-001) Nickerson 

0950-1120(012-252-002) Nickerson 

ANT 252E Cultural Anthropology 3 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (012-252-003) Staff 

ANT 253 Prehistoric Archaeology 3 

0950-1120(012-253-001) Rovner 

ANT 498 Special Topics in Anthropology 1-6 

Prerequisite: Six hours of SOC/ANT 

Hours arranged (012-498-001) Suval 

ANT 591 Special Topics in Anthropology Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: ANT 501 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (012-591-001) Suval 

SECOND SESSION 

ANT 251 Physical Anthropology 3 

0800-0930 (012-251-001) Staff 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology 3 

0800-0930 (012-252-001) Ellovich 

0950-1120(012-252-002) Ellovich 

1140-1310(012-252-003) Wallace 

ANT 252E Cultural Anthropology 3 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (012-252-004) Staff 

ANT 254 Language and Culture 3 

0950-1120(012-254-001) Wallace 

ANT 498 Special Topics in Anthropology 1-6 

Prerequisite: Six hours of SOC/ANT 

Hours arranged (012-498-001) Suval 

ANT 591 Special Topics in Anthropology Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: ANT 501 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (012-591-001) Suval 

""Course taught in the three-week Regional Summer School for Adult, Extension and 
Community College Educators (June 6-24). Special registration procedures are 
required. See page 28 for additional information. 



40 



Architecture 
FIRST SESSION 

ARC 349 Historic Architecture Research 3 

Prerequisite: DN 141 or DN 142 or ARC 244 

Hours arranged (013-349-001) Weinel 

ARC 494 Internship in Architecture 3-6 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in Architecture: 3.0 GPA or better; and written approval of 

department head 

Maximum 6 credit hours 

Hours arranged (013-494-001) Burns 

ARC 495 Independent Study in Architecture 1-3 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in Architecture; 3.0 GPA or better; and written approval of 

department head 

Maximum 6 credit hours 

Hours arranged (013-495-001) Burns 

ARC 595 Independent Study 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (013-595-001) Burns 

ARC 691 Special Topics in Architecture Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (013-691-001) Burns 

SECOND SESSION 

ARC 494 Internship in Architecture 3-6 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in Architecture; 3.0 GPA or better; and written approval of 

department head 

Maximum 6 credit hours 

Hours arranged (013-494-001) Burns 

ARC 495 Independent Study in Architecture 1-3 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in Architecture; 3.0 GPA or better; and approval of depart- 
ment head 

Maximum 6 credit hours 
Hours arranged (013-495-001) Burns 

ARC 595 Independent Study 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (013-595-001) Burns 

ARC 692 Special Topics in Architecture Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (013-692-001) Burns 

TEN-WEEK SESSION 

$ ARC 400 Architecture Studio 6 

Prerequisite: DF 102 or written approval of department head and Dean 

1340-1750 MTuWTh (013-400-051) Rifki 

May 24-July 21— Eight- Week Course— Final Exam July 21 



41 



Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

FIRST SESSION 

BAE 590 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate standing in Biological and Agricultural Engineering 
Hours arranged (016-590-001) Blum 

BAE 690 Special Topics 1-4 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (016-690-001) Sowell 

BAE 699 Research in Biological and Agricultural Engineering Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Hours arranged (016-699-001) Sowell 

SECOND SESSION 

BAE 590 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate standing in Biological and Agricultural Engineering 
Hours arranged (016-590-001) Blum 

BAE 690 Special Topics 1-4 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (016-690-001) Sowell 

BAE 699 Research in Biological and Agricultural Engineering Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Hours arranged (016-699-001) Sowell 

Biochemistry 
FIRST SESSION 

BCH 490 Special Studies in Biochemistry 1-3 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Hours arranged (015-490-001) Staff 

$ BCH 554 Radioisotope Techniques in Biology 2 

Prerequisite: BCH 451 or Consent of Instructor 

0800-1200 (015-554-001) Sisler 

May 24-June 14— Three-week course— Final Exam June 14 

BCH 590 Special Topics in Biochemistry Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: BCH 451 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (015-590-001) Staff 

BCH 695 Special Topics in Biochemistry Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Biochemistry 

Hours arranged (015-695-001) Staff 

BCH 699 Biochemical Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (015-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

BCH 451 Introductory Biochemistry 3 

Prerequisite: CH 223 

0950-1120(015-451-001) Staff 

BCH 490 Special Studies in Biochemistry 1-3 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Hours arranged (015-490-001) Staff 



42 



BCH 590 Special Topics in Biochemistry Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: BCH 451 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (015-590-001) Staff 

BCH 695 Special Topics in Biochemistry Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Biochemistry 

Hours arranged (015-695-001) Staff 

BCH 699 Biochemical Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (015-699-001) Staff 

Biomathematics 

FIRST SESSION 

BMA 591 Special Topics Maximum 3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (018-591-001) Staff 

BMA 691 Advanced Special Topics 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (018-691-001) Staff 

BMA 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (018-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

BMA 591 Special Topics Maximum 3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (018-591-001) Staff 

BMA 691 Advanced Special Topics 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (018-691-001) Staff 

BMA 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (018-699-001) Staff 



Botany 



FIRST SESSION 



BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 3 

(See Zoology) 

$ BO (ZO) 365 Ecology Laboratory 1 

(See Zoology) 

BO 590 Topical Problems 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (019-590-001) Staff 

BO 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (019-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

$ BO 200 Plant Life 4 

LR 0800-0930 (019-200-001) Beckmann 

LB 1340-1750 MW (019-200-101) 
LB 1340-1750 TuTh (019-200-102) 



43 



BO 590 Topical Problems 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (019-590-001) Staff 

BO 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (019-699-001) Staff 



Biological Sciences 



FIRST SESSION 



$ BS 100 General Biology 4 

Students may not receive credit for both BS 100 and BS 105 

LR 0800-0930 (017-100-001) Wynn 

LB 1020-1300 TuTh (017-100-101) 

LB 1340-1620 TuTh (017-100-102) 

LB 1020-1300 WF (017-100-103) 

LB 1340-1620 WF (017-100-104) 

BS 495A Special Topics in Biology 1-6 

Hours arranged (017-495-001) Staff 

BS 495T Special Topics in Biology: Laboratory Techniques for 3 

Secondary Teachers 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged Lytle/Williams 

June 20-July 1 — Two-week course — Final exam July 1 

Special registration procedures are required for this course. Contact Dr. Charles 
F. Lytle, Biological Sciences, NCSU, Box 7611, Raleigh, NC 27695-7611 (919/737- 
3341). 

SECOND SESSION 

BS 495A Special Topics in Biology 1-6 

Hours arranged (017-495-001) Staff 

Civil Engineering 
FIRST SESSION 

CE 213 Introduction to Mechanics 3 

Corequisite: MA 202. Not for CE Department majors. 

0730-0900 (022-213-001) Staff 

CE 214 Engineering Mechanics— Statics 3 

Prerequisite: PY 205 
Corequisite: MA 202 
0910-1040 (022-214-001) Staff 

CE 215 Engineering Mechanics — Dynamics 3 

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in CE 214 

Corequisite: MA 301 

1050-1220(022-215-001) Staff 

CE 313 Mechanics of Solids 3 

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in CE 214 

Corequisite: MA 301 

0910-1040 (022-313-001) Staff 



44 



CE 498A Special Problems in Civil Engineering 1-4 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Hours arranged (022-498-001) Wahls 

CE 562 Construction Productivity 3 

Prerequisite: CE 463 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (022-562-001) Staff 

CE 598 Civil Engineering Projects 1-6 

Hours arranged (022-598-001) Wahls 

CE 698 Advanced Reading in Civil Engineering 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (022-698-001) Wahls 

CE 699 Civil Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (022-699-001) Wahls 

SECOND SESSION 

CE 213 Introduction to Mechanics 3 

Corequisite: MA 202. Not for CE Department majors. 

0730-0900 (022-213-001) Staff 

CE 214 Engineering Mechanics— Statics 3 

Prerequisite: PY 205 
Corequisite: MA 202 
0910-1040 (022-214-001) Staff 

CE 215 Engineering Mechanics— Dynamics 3 

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in CE 214 

Corequisite: MA 301 

1050-1220 (022-215-001) Staff 

CE 313 Mechanics of Solids 3 

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in CE 214 

Corequisite: MA 301 

0730-0900 (022-313-001) Staff 

CE 498A Special Problems in Civil Engineering 1-4 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Hours arranged (022-498-001) Wahls 

CE 598 Civil Engineering Projects 1-6 

Hours arranged (022-598-001) Wahls 

CE 698 Advanced Reading in Civil Engineering 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (022-698-001) Wahls 

CE 699 Civil Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (022-699-001) Wahls 

TEN-WEEK SESSION 

CE 325 Structural Analysis 3 

Prerequisites: CE 202 and CE 313 

0910-1040 MWF (022-325-051) Staff 

CE 327 Reinforced Concrete Design 3 

Prerequisites: CE 325 and CE 332 

1050-1220 TuTh (022-327-051) Staff 



45 



$ CE 382 Hydraulics 4 

Prerequisites: CE 202, CE 215. MA 301 

LR 0730-0900 MWF (022-382-051) Staff 

LB 0730-0900 TuTh (022-382-151) 

CE 426 Structural Steel Design 3 

Prerequisite: CE 325 

0910-1040 MWF (022-426-051) Staff 



Chemistry 



FIRST SESSION 



$ CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 with a grade of C or better 

LR 0800-0930 (021-101-001) Staff 

LB 0940-1340 MW (021-101-101) (021-101-102) (021-101-103) 

LB 1340-1750 MW (021-101-110) (021-101-111) (021-101-112) 

$ CH 104 Experimental Chemistry 1 

Prerequisite: CH 101 

Corequisite: CH 105 

LB 1340-1750 MW (021-104-001) Staff 

CH 105 Chemistry Principles and Applications 3 

Prerequisite: CH 101 with a grade of C or better. Credit cannot be received for both CH 105 

and either CH 103 or CH 107. 
0950-1120(021-105-001) Staff 

$ CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

Prerequisite: CH 101 with a grade of C or better. 

LR 0950-1120 (021-107-001) Staff 

LB 1340-1750 MW (021-107-109) (021-107-113) (021-107-114) (021-107-115) (021-107-116) 

$ CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

Prerequisite: CH 107. Credit is not allowed for both CH 220 and CH 221. 

LR 0800-0930 (021-221-001) Staff 

LB 0940-1340 MW (021-221-101) (021-221-102) (021-221-103) 

LB 1340-1750 MW (021-221-105) (021-221-106) 

$ CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

Prerequisite: CH 221 

LR 0800-0930 (021-223-001) Staff 

LB 0940-1340 TuTh (021-223-109) (021-223-111) 

LB 1340-1750 TuTh (021-223-112) (021-223-113) 

$ CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

Prerequisite: CH 103 or CH 107. or CH 104 and CH 105. Credit is not allowed for both CH 

315 and CH 317. 
LR 0800-0930 (021-315-001) Staff 

LB 0940-1340 MW (021-315-101) 
LB 1340-1750 MW (021-315-102) 

CH 401 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Corequisite: CH 431 or CH 331 

0950-1120(021-401-001) Staff 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I 3 

Prerequisites: CH 107, MA 202, PY 203 or PY 208 

Corequisite: MA 301 

1140-1310(021-431-001) Staff 



46 



$ CH 499 Senior Research in Chemistry 1-3 

Prerequisite: Three years in Chemistry 

Hours arranged (021-499-001) Staff 

CH 699 Chemical Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Chemistry 

Hours arranged (021-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

$ CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 with a grade of C or better 

LR 0800-0930 (021-101-001) Staff 

LB 0940-1340 MW (021-101-101) (021-101-102) 

LB 1340-1750 MW (021-101-110) (021-101-111) 

$ CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

Prerequisite: CH 101 

LR 0800-0930 (021-103-001) Staff 

LB 0940-1340 MW (021-103-104) (021-103-105) 

LB 1340-1750 MW (021-103-112) 

$ CH 104 Experimental Chemistry 1 

Prerequisite: CH 101 

Corequisite: CH 105 

LB 1340-1750 MW (021-104-001) Staff 

CH 105 Chemistry Principles and Applications 3 

Prerequisite: CH 101 with a grade of Cor better. Credit cannot be received for both CH 105 

and either CH 103 or CH 107. 
0950-1120(021-105-001) Staff 

$ CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

Prerequisite: CH 101 with a grade of C or better. 

LR 0950-1120 (021-107-001) Staff 

LB 1340-1750 MW (021-107-109) (021-107-113) (021-107-114) (021-107-115) 

$ CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

Prerequisite: CH 107. Credit is not allowed for both CH 220 and CH 221. 

LR 0800-0930 (021-221-001) Staff 

LB 0940-1340 MW (021-221-101) (021-221-102) 

$ CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

Prerequisite: CH 221 

LR 0800-0930 (021-223-001) Staff 

LB 0940-1340 MW (021-223-109) (021-223-112) 

LB 0940-1340 TuTh (021-223-110) (021-223-111) 

LB 1340-1750 MW (021-223-115) 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II 3 

Prerequisites: CH 431 and MA 301 

1140-1310(021-433-001) Staff 

$ CH 499 Senior Research in Chemistry 1-3 

Prerequisite: Three years in Chemistry 

Hours arranged (021-499-001) Staff 

CH 595T Special Topics in Chemistry: High School Teachers I 6 

Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry or equivalent teaching experience. 
0950-1120(021-595-001) Staff 



47 



CH 691 Seminar Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Chemistry 

Hours arranged (021-691-001) Staff 

CH 699 Chemical Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Chemistry 

Hours arranged (021-699-001) Staff 

Chemical Engineering 
FIRST SESSION 

$ CHE 205 Chemical Process Principles 4 

Prerequisites: MA 201, PY 205, CH 107 

Corequisite: MA 202 

1020-1230 (020-205-001) Staff 

CHE 497 Chemical Engineering Projects I 3 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, CHE 330 

Hours arranged (020-497-00 1 ) Staff 

CHE 498 Chemical Engineering Projects II 1-3 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, CHE 330 

Hours arranged (020-498-001) Staff 

CHE 597 Chemical Engineering Projects 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (020-597-00 1 ) Staff 

CHE 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (020-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

$ CHE 225 Chemical Process Systems 3 

Prerequisites: PY 208, a grade of C or better in CHE 205 

Corequisite: MA 301 

LR 1020-1230 TuTh (020-225-001) Staff 

LB 0950-1120 MWF (020-225-101) 

LB 1140-1310 MWF (020-225-102) 

CHE 497 Chemical Engineering Projects I 3 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, CHE 330 

Hours arranged (020-497-001) Staff 

CHE 498 Chemical Engineering Projects II 1-3 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, CHE 330 

Hours arranged (020-498-001) Staff 

CHE 597 Chemical Engineering Projects 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (020-597-001) Staff 

CHE 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (020-699-001) Staff 



48 



CO-OP PROGRAM 

TWELVE-WEEK SESSION 

(Deadlines for Ten-Week Session apply) 

Engineering Undergraduate Students Only 

COP 100E Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-100-051) Weston 

COP 200E Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-200-051) Weston 

COP 300E Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-300-051) Weston 

COP 400E Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-400-051) Weston 

COP 500E Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-500-051) Weston 

Forest Resources Undergraduate Students Only 

COP 100F Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-100-052) Weston 

COP 200F Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-200-052) Weston 

COP 300F Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-300-052) Weston 

COP 400F Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-400-052) Weston 

COP 500F Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-500-052) Weston 

Humanities and Social Sciences Undergraduate Students Only 

COP 100L Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-100-053) Weston 

COP 200L Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-200-053) Weston 

COP 300L Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-300-053) Weston 

COP 400L Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-400-053) Weston 

COP 500L Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-500-053) Weston 

Physical and Mathematical Sciences Undergraduate Students Only 

COP 100P Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-100-054) Weston 

COP 200P Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-200-054) Weston 

COP 300P Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-300-054) Weston 



49 



COP 400P Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-400-054) 

COP 500P Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-500-054) 

Textiles Undergraduate Students Only 

COP 100T Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-100-055) 

COP 200T Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-200-055) 

COP 300T Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-300-055) 

COP 400T Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-400-055) 

COP 500T Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-500-055) 

Agriculture and Life Sciences Undergraduate Students Only 

COP 100A Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-100-056) 

COP 200A Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-200-056) 

COP 300A Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-300-056) 

COP 400A Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-400-056) 

COP 500A Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-500-056) 

Design Undergraduate Students Only 

COP 100D Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-100-057) 

COP 200D Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-200-057) 

COP 300D Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-300-057) 

COP 400D Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged <025-400-057) 

COP 500D Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-500-057) 

Education Undergraduate Students Only 

COP 100W Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-100-058) 

COP 200W Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-200-058) 




Weston 


Weston 




Weston 


Weston 


Weston 



Weston 


Weston 




Weston 


Weston 


Weston 


Weston 


Weston 




Weston 


Weston 


Weston 


Weston 


Weston 




Weston 


Weston 



50 



COP 300W Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-300-058) Weston 

COP 400W Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-400-058) Weston 

COP 500W Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (025-500-058) Weston 

Graduate Students Only 

COP 500N Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged. Full-time Alternating. (025-500-059) Weston 

COP 500R Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged. Part-time Parallel. (025-500-060) Weston 

Crop Science 

FIRST SESSION 

CS 591 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (024-591-001) Emery 

CS 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (024-699-001) Emery 

SECOND SESSION 

CS 591 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (024-591-001) Emery 

CS 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (024-699-001) Emery 

ADULT EDUCATION SESSION 

*CS 59 1G Crop Stress Relations 3 

Prerequisite: BO 424 or an equivalent plant physiology course 

0800-1000 (plus three 3-hour field trips, times arranged) Patterson 

June 6-June 24— Three-Week Course— Final Exam June 24 

*Course taught in the three-week Regional Summer School for Adult, Extension and 
Community College Educators (June 6-24). Special registration procedures are 
required. See page 28 for additional information. 

Computer Science 
TEN-WEEK SESSION 

$ CSC 101E Introduction to Programming 3 

Prerequisite: MA 111 with a grade of C or better 

LR 1745-1930 MW (023-101-051) Nelson 

LB 1945-2130 MW (023-101-151) (023-101-152) (023-101-153) (023-101-154) 
(023-101-155) (023-101-156) 

$ CSC 102 Programming Concepts 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 101 

1340-1525 MW (023-102-051) Brain 



51 



$ CSC 102E Programming Concepts 

Prerequisite: CSC 101 
1745-1930 MW (023-102-052) 

$ CSC 111 Introduction to FORTRAN Programming 

0800-0930 MW (023-111-051) 



3 

Brain 

2 
Martin 



CSC 200A Introduction to Computers and Their Uses 3 

A student who has previously taken CSC 101 or CSC 111 may not receive credit for this 

course. 

1140-1255 TuTh (023-200-051) Lindhome/Curtis 

NOTE: Students registering for CSC 200A must also register for CSC 200X 

$ CSC 200X Introduction to Computers Laboratory 

1305-1605 Tu (023-200-151) 
0900-1200 W (023-200-152) 
1305-1605 W (023-200-153) 

CSC 200E Introduction to Computers and Their Uses 3 

A student who has previously taken CSC 101 or CSC 111 may not receive credit for this 

course. 

1615-1730 TuTh (023-200-052) Lindhome/Curtis 

NOTE: Students registering for CSC 200E must also register for CSC 200Y 



$ CSC 200Y Introduction to Computers Laboratory 

1745-2045 Tu (023-200-161) 
1745-2045 W (023-200-162) 
1745-2045 Th (023-200-163) 

$ CSC 201 Basic Computer Organization and Assembly Language 

Prerequisite: CSC 102 
1340-1525 TuTh (023-201-051) 

$ CSC 201E Basic Computer Organization and Assembly Language 

Prerequisite: CSC 102 
1945-2130 TuTh (023-201-052) 

$ CSC 202E Concepts and Facilities of Operating Systems 

Prerequisite: CSC 201 or equivalent 
1745-1930 TuTh (023-202-051) 

$ CSC 302 Introduction to Numerical Methods 

Prerequisites: CSC 101 or CSC 111, MA 202 
1200-1345 MW (023-302-051) 

$ CSC 311 Data Structures 

Prerequisite: CSC 102 
1140-1325 TuTh (023-311-051) 

$ CSC 31 IE Data Structures 

Prerequisite: CSC 102 
1745-1930 TuTh (023-311-052) 

$ CSC 312 Computer Organization and Logic 

Prerequisite: CSC 201 

Corequisite: CSC 322 

LR 0950-1120 MW (023-312-051) 

LB 1340-1550 MW (023-312-151) (023-312-152) 

CSC (MA) 322 Discrete Mathematical Structures 

Prerequisite: MA 202 
Corequisite: CSC 311 
0910-1055 MW (023-322-051) 







E. Hodges 
3 

Lasher 
3 

Miller 
3 

Reid 
3 

L. Hodges 
3 

E. Hodges 
4 

Martin 



Williamson 



52 



$ CSC 417 Theory of Programming Languages 3 

Prerequisite: CSC (MA) 322 

1200-1345 MW (023-417-051) Williamson 

CSC 42 IE Introduction to Management Information Systems 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 311 

1745-1930 MW (023-421-051) Reid 

$ CSC 431E File Organization and Processing 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 311 

1545-1730 TuTh (023-431-051) Ruchte 

$ CSC 461 Computer Graphics 3 

Prerequisites: MA 202 or MA 212; CSC 101 or CSC 111 

1340-1525 TuTh (023-461-051) Love 

$ CSC 461E Computer Graphics 3 

Prerequisites: MA 202 or MA 212; CSC 101 or CSC 111 

1745-1930 TuTh (023-461-052) L. Hodges 

CSC 495 Special Topics in Computer Science 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (023-495-051) Honeycutt 

$ CSC 499 Independent Research in Computer Science 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of Department 

Hours arranged (023-499-051) Honeycutt 

Computer Studies 
TEN-WEEK SESSION 

$ CSE 452 Assembly Language and Basic Computer Organization 1 

Prerequisites: Higher level programming language and Consent of Instructor 

No degree credit for Computer Science or Computer Studies majors or anyone having 

received credit for CSC 201 or CSC 256. 

1340-1525 TuTh (009-452-051) E. Hodges 

$ CSE 452E Assembly Language and Basic Computer Organization 1 

Prerequisites: Higher level programming language and Consent of Instructor 

No degree credit for Computer Science or Computer Studies majors or anyone having 

received credit for CSC 201 or CSC 256. 

1945-2130 TuTh (009-452-052) Lasher 

$ CSE 453 Data Structures 1 

Prerequisites: Higher level programming language and Consent of Instructor 

Corequisite: CSE 452 or equivalent 

No degree credit for Computer Science or Computer Studies majors or anyone having 

received credit for CSC 311. 

1140-1325 TuTh (009-453-051) L. Hodges 

$ CSE 453E Data Structures 1 

Prerequisites: Higher level programming language and Consent of Instructor 

Corequisite: CSE 452 or equivalent 

No degree credit for Computer Science or Computer Studies majors or anyone having 

received credit for CSC 311. 

1745-1930 TuTh (009-453-052) E. Hodges 



53 



CSE 454 Computer Organization and Logic 1 

Prerequisites: CSE 452 or equivalent and Consent of Instructor 

No degree credit for Computer Science or Computer Studies majors or anyone having 

received credit for CSC 312. 

0950-1120 MW (009-454-051) Martin 

CSE 693 Individual Topics in Computer Studies 1-3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (009-693-051) Honeycutt 

$ CSE 699 Computer Studies Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (009-699-051) Honeycutt 

Design 
FIRST SESSION 

DN 494 Internship in Design 3-6 

Prerequisites: Junior standing; 3.0 GPA or better; and approval of department head 

Maximum 6 credit hours 

Hours arranged (026-494-001) Joyner 

DN 495 Independent Study in Design 1-3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in Design; 3.0 GPA or better; and approval of department 

head 
Maximum 6 credit hours 
Hours arranged (026-495-001) Joyner 

SECOND SESSION 

DN 494 Internship in Design 3-6 

Prerequisites: Junior standing; 3.0 GPA or better; and approval of department head 

Maximum 6 credit hours 

Hours arranged (026-494-001) Joyner 

DN 495 Independent Study in Design 1-3 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in Design: 3.0 GPA or better: and approval of department 

head 
Maximum 6 credit hours 
Hours arranged (026-495-001) Joyner 

Economics and Business 
FIRST SESSION 

EB 201 Economics I 3 

Credit will not be awarded for both EB 201 and EB 212. Students interested in Agriculture 
and Natural Resources should enroll in EB 212 instead of this course. 

0800-0930 (027-201-001) Flath 

0950-1120(027-201-002) Flath 

0950-1120 (027-201-003) Liebowitz 

0950-1120 (027-201-004) V. Smith 

1340-1510 (027-201-005) Liebowitz 

1140-1310(027-201-006) Staff 

0800-0930 (027-201-007) Staff 

EB 202 Economics II 3 

Prerequisite: EB 201 or EB 212 

0800-0930 (027-202-001) Staff 

0950-1120(027-202-002) Staff 



54 



EB 301 Intermediate Microeconomics 

Prerequisites: MA 113 or MA 112 and EB 201 or EB 212 
0800-0930 (027-301-001) 
0950-1120(027-301-002) 
1340-1510 (027-301-003) 

EB 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics 

Prerequisites: EB 201 or EB 212; MA 113 or MA 112 

0800-0930 (027-302-001) 

1140-1310(027-302-002) 

0950-1120(027-302-003) 



Grennes 
Ball 
Ball 



Rossana 
McElroy 
McElroy 



EB 307 Business Law I 3 

Prerequisite: EB 201 or EB 212. Credit for both EB 306 and EB 307 is not allowed. 
1140-1310(027-307-001) Carraway 

EB 313 Marketing Methods 3 

Prerequisite: EB 201 or EB 212 

1140-1310(027-313-001) Kimbrough 

0950-1120(027-313-002) Kimbrough 

EB 325 Managerial Economics 3 

Prerequisite: EB 201 or EB 212 
0800-0930 (027-325-001) 
0950-1120(027-325-002) 

EB 326 Human Resource Management 

Prerequisite: EB 201 or EB 212 

1140-1310(027-326-001) 

0950-1120(027-326-002) 

EB (ST) 350 Economics and Business Statistics 

Prerequisites: MA 114: EB 201 or EB 212 or equivalent 
0800-0930 (027-350-001) 
0950-1120(027-350-002) 
0800-0930 (027-350-003) 

EB 404 Money, Financial Markets, and the Economy 

Prerequisite: EB 302 
0800-0930 (027-404-001) 

EB 420 Corporation Finance 

Prerequisites: EB 201 or EB 212 and ACC 260 or ACC 265 

0950-1120(027-420-001) 

0800-0930 (027-420-002) 

EB 422 Investments and Portfolio Management 

Prerequisites: EB (ST) 350 or ST 311 and EB 420 
0950-1120(027-422-001) 

EB 431 Labor Economics 

Prerequisite: EB 301 
0800-0930 (027-431-001) 
0950-1120(027-431-002) 

EB 448 International Economics 

Prerequisite: EB 301 
0950-1120(027-448-001) 

EB 475 Comparative Economic Systems 

Prerequisite: EB 201 or EB 212 
0950-1120(027-475-001) 



Sloan 
Sloan 



Fisher 
Fisher 



Wilson 

Wilson 

V. Smith 



Karanjia 
3 

Karanjia 
Kupiec 



Kupiec 
3 

Wessels 
Wessels 

3 

Grennes 
3 

Turner 



55 



EB 498 Independent Study in Economics and Business 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (027-498-00 1 ) Staff 

EB 502 Income and Employment Theory 3 

Prerequisites: MA 113, EB 301 and EB 302, EB (ST) 350 

0800-0930 (027-502-001) Lapp 

EB 598 Topical Problems in Economics 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (027-598-001) Staff 

EB 699 Research in Economics Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (027-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

EB 201 Economics I 3 

Credit will not be awarded for both EB 201 and EB 212. Students interested in Agriculture 
and Natural Resources should enroll in EB 212 instead of this course. 

0800-0930 (027-201-001) Staff 

0950-1120 (027-201-002) (027-201-004) Staff 

1140-1310(027-201-003) Staff 

EB 202 Economics II 3 

Prerequisite: EB 201 or EB 212 

0800-0930 (027-202-001) Staff 

0950-1120(027-202-002) Staff 

EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

Prerequisite: MA 111. Credit will not be awarded for both EB 201 and EB 212. 

0950-1120(027-212-001) Peeler 

EB 301 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 

Prerequisites: MA 113 or MA 112 and EB 201 or EB 212 

0950-1120(027-301-001) Staff 

0800-0930 (027-301-002) Staff 

EB 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 

Prerequisites: EB 201 or EB 212; MA 113 or MA 112 

0950-1120(027-302-001) Fisher 

0950-1120(027-302-002) Cuddy 

0800-0930 (027-302-003) Cuddy 

EB 308 Business Law II 3 

Prerequisite: EB 307 

0950-1120(027-308-001) Huggard 

1140-1310(027-308-002) Huggard 

EB 313 Marketing Methods 3 

Prerequisite: EB 201 or EB 212 

0800-0930 (027-313-001) Hess 

EB 325 Managerial Economics 3 

Prerequisite: EB 201 or EB 212 

0950-1120(027-325-001) Newmark 

EB (ST) 350 Economics and Business Statistics 3 

Prerequisites: MA 114; EB 201 or EB 212 or equivalent 

0800-0930 (027-350-001) McCrickard 

0950- 1 120 (027-350-002) McCrickard 



56 



EB (HI) 370 The Rise of Industrialism 

Prerequisite: EB 20i or EB 212 
1140-1310(027-370-001) 

EB 420 Corporation Finance 

Prerequisites: EB 201 or EB 212, and ACC 260 or ACC 265 
0800-0930 (027-420-001) 

EB 422 Investments and Portfolio Management 

Prerequisites: EB (ST) 350 or ST 311 and EB 420 

0950-1120(027-422-001) 

1140-1310(027-422-002) 

EB 431 Labor Economics 

Prerequisite: EB 301 
0800-0930 (027-431-001) 

EB 498 Independent Study in Economics and Business 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 
Hours arranged (027-498-001) 

EB 501 Price Theory 

Prerequisites: MA 113 and EB 301 
1140-1310(027-501-001) 

EB 598 Topical Problems in Economics 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (027-598-001) 

EB 699 Research in Economics 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (027-699-001) 

TEN-WEEK SESSION 



D. Fisher 
3 

M. Fisher 
3 

Jones 
Jones 

3 

Fearn 
1-6 

Staff 
3 

Fearn 
1-6 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 



EB 307E Business Law I 3 

Prerequisite: EB 201 or EB 212. Credit for both EB 306 and EB 307 is not allowed. 

1745-1930 MW (027-307-051) Staff 

EB 603E History of Economic Thought 3 

Prerequisites: EB 501, EB 502 or equivalent 

1745-1930 MW (027-603-051) D. Fisher 

EB 625E Long Range Planning in Business and Industry 3 

Prerequisite: EB 501 

1745-1930 TuTh (027-625-051) Newmark 



ADULT EDUCATION SESSION 

*EB 403 Economics of Consumer Decisions 

Prerequisite: EB 201 or EB 212 or equivalent 

1330-1630 

June 6-June 24— Three- Week Course— Final Exam June 24 

*EB 433 U. S. Agricultural Policy 

Prerequisite: EB 301 or EB 401 

0830-1130 

June 6-June 24— Three-Week Course— Final Exam June 24 



3 

Walden 

3 
Holder 



*Course taught in the three-week Regional Summer School for Adult, Extension and 
Community College Educators (June 6-24). Special registration procedures are 
required. See page 28 for additional information. 



57 



Electrical and Computer Engineering 
FIRST SESSION 

ECE 331 Principles of Electrical Engineering I 3 

Prerequisites: MA 201. PY 208 

Not available to EE and CPE majors 

0800-0930 (030-331-001) Staff 

ECE 435 Elements of Control 3 

Prerequisites: ECE 301. ECE 302, ECE 314 

0950-1120(030-435-001) Staff 

ECE 699 Electrical Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Electrical and Computer Engineering and approval of 

advisor 
Hours arranged (030-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

ECE 332 Principles of Electrical Engineering II 3 

Prerequisite: ECE 331 

Not available to undergraduates in Electrical Engineering 

1140-1310(030-332-001) Staff 

ECE 436 Digital Control Systems 3 

Prerequisite: ECE 435 

1730-1915 MTuWTh (030-436-001) Staff 

ECE 699 Electrical Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Electrical and Computer Engineering and approval of 

advisor 
Hours arranged (030-699-001) Staff 

TEN-WEEK SESSION 

ECE 211 Electric Circuits I 3 

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and GPA 2.4 or above with a grade of C or better in 

ENG 111, MA 141S, MA 241S, and PY 205. 
Corequisites: PY 208, MA 202S (Note: students may satisfy the MA corequisite by schedul- 
ing MA 202S in the Second Summer Session) 
1140-1255 MWF (030-211-051) Staff 

ECE 212 Fundamentals of Logic Design 3 

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and GPA 2.4 or above and a grade of C or better in 

ENG 111, MA HIS, MA 241S, and PY 205. 
0950-1105 MWF (030-212-051) Staff 

$ ECE 213 Electronic Circuits I Laboratory 1 

Prerequisite: ECE 211 (Correspondence students) 
Corequisite: ECE 211 

1345-1635 M (030-213-051) Staff 

1 135-1425 Tu (030-213-052) Staff 

1445-1735 Tu (030-213-053) Staff 

1345-1635 W (030-213-054) Staff 

1135-1425 Th (030-213-055) Staff 

1445-1735 Th (030-213-056) Staff 



58 



$ ECE 214 Fundamentals of Logic Design Laboratory 

Corequisite: ECE 212 
1135-1425 M (030-214-051) 
1445-1735 M (030-214-052) 
1135-1425 Tu (030-214-053) 
1445-1735 Tu (030-214-054) 
1135-1425 W (030-214-055) 
1445-1735 W (030-214-056) 

$ ECE 301 Linear Systems 

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ECE 211 
0950-1105 MWF (030-301-051) 

$ ECE 302 Electrical Circuits II with Numerical Applications 

Prerequisites: CSC 101 and a grade of C or better in ECE 211 
0800-0915 MWF (030-302-051) 

ECE 303 Electromagnetic Fields 

Prerequisites: MA 301S and a grade of C or better in ECE 211 
1140-1255 MWF (030-303-051) 

ECE 409 Introduction to Telecommunications Engineering 

Prerequisite: ECE 301 
0800-0915 MWF (030-409-051) 

ECE 540 Electromagnetic Fields 

Prerequisite: ECE 448 
1530-1645 MWF (030-540-051) 



1 

Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 

3 

Staff 
3 

Staff 
3 

Kauffman 
3 

Bottomley 
3 

Kauffman 



Education 



FIRST SESSION 



ED 105 College Developmental Reading 3 

Credit is not applicable toward graduation in any curriculum. 

1300-1430 (028-105-001) Kuzminski 

ED 200 Principles for Teaching Geography 3 

0940-1110(028-200-001) Harper 

ED 203 Introduction to Teaching Mathematics and Science 3 

0800-1120(028-203-001) Wheatley 

ED 205 Introduction to Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences 3 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

0800-0930 (028-205-001) Harper 

ED 296 Special Topics in Education 1-3 

Hours arranged (028-296-001) Williams 

ED 296B Special Topics in Education: Health Care Delivery Systems 3 

1700-2030 MTh (028-296-002) Patterson 

ED 344 School and Society 3 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing 

1340-1510 (028-344-001) Staff 

ED 451 Improving Reading In Secondary Schools 2 

Prerequisite: Six hours of ED and/or PSY 

1135-1235 (028-451-001) Kuzminski 



59 



ED 496 Special Topics in Education 

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (028-496-001) 

ED 496N Special Topics in Education: New Developments in 
Teaching English as a Second Language 

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and Consent of Instructor 
1745-1900 MTuWTh (028-496-002) 

ED 526 Teaching in College 

1300-1430 (028-526-001) 

ED 530E Theories and Techniques of Counseling 

Prerequisite: Six hours of ED or PSY 
Corequisite: ED 520 or equivalent 
1600-1930 TuTh (028-530-001) 
1600-1930 MW (028-530-002) 



1-3 

Williams 
3 

Fennell 

3 

Wheatley 



Saidla 
Gerler 



ED 590 Special Problems in Guidance Maximum 6 

Prerequisites: Six hours graduate work in department or equivalent and Consent of 

Instructor 
Hours arranged (028-590-00 1 ) Staff 

ED 592 Special Problems in Mathematics Teaching 1-3 

Prerequisite: ED 471 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (028-592-00 1 ) Staff 

ED 593C Special Problems in Occupational Education: 3 

Innovation/Entrepreneurship for Educational Leadership 

Prerequisite: Senior standing, PBS status, or Graduate standing in OED 

0900-1600 (028-593-001) Wenig 

June 13-June 28— Two-Week Course— Final Exam June 28 

Registration for this course must be completed during the regularly scheduled Pre- 
registration and Registration times set for the First Summer Session. 



ED 594 Special Problems in Science Teaching 

Prerequisite: ED 476 or equivalent 
Hours arranged (028-594-001) 

ED 596 Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 
Education 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 
Hours arranged (028-596-001) 

ED 596A Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 
Education: Death and Dying— A Lifespan Issue 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 
1600-1930 MW (028-596-002) 

ED 596B Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 
Education: Working in Groups in Adult Education 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 
1600-1930 TuTh (028-596-003) 

ED 597 Special Problems in Education 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 
Hours arranged (028-597-001) 

ED 597G Special Problems in Education: Personal Publishing 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 
1600-1930 TuTh (028-597-002) 



60 



1-6 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 
3 

Glass 
3 

Glass 
1-3 

Exum 
3 

Ballenger 






ED 598 Special Problems in Curriculum and Instruction 1-6 

Prerequisites: Six hours of ED or PSY and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (028-598-00 1 ) Staff 

ED 598F Special Problems in Curriculum and Instruction: 3 

Alternatives for the Middle Years 

Prerequisites: Six hours of ED or PSY and Consent of Instructor 

0830-1500 Arnold 

0830-1500 Stevenson 

June 20-July 1— Two- Week course— Final Exam July 1 

Special registration procedures are required. See page 27 for additional infor- 
mation. 

ED 599 Research Projects in Education 1-3 

Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor; ED 532 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (028-599-001) Exum 

ED 599A Research Projects in Education: Adult and Community 1-3 

College Education 

Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor; ED 532 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (028-599-002) Staff 

ED 621 Internship in Education 3-9 

Prerequisites: Nine credit hours in graduate level courses and Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (028-621-001) Exum 

ED 621A Internship in Education: Special Education 3 

Prerequisites: Nine credit hours in graduate level courses and Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (028-621-002) Crossland 

ED 636 Observation and Supervised Field Work 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (028-636-001) Staff 

ED 639E Group Counseling 3 

Prerequisites: ED 530 and one of the following: ED 520, ED 534, ED 553, or ED 535 
1600-1930 TuTh (028-639-001) Gerler 

ED 699 Thesis and Dissertation Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: 15 hours of Education; Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (028-699-001) Exum 

ED 699A Thesis and Dissertation Research: Adult and Credits Arranged 

Community College Education 

Prerequisites: 15 hours of Education; Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (028-699-002) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

ED 105 College Developmental Reading 3 

Credit is not applicable toward graduation in any curriculum 

0800-0930 (028-105-001) Staff 

ED 210 College Tutoring 2 

Registration priority will be given to students who plan to become tutors or who are 

tutoring 

LR Hours arranged (028-210-001) Staff 

LB 1200-1300 MWF (028-210-101) 

ED 296 Special Topics in Education 1-3 

Hours arranged (028-296-001) Williams 



61 



ED 344 School and Society 3 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing 

0945-1125(028-344-001) Staff 

ED 496 Special Topics in Education 1-3 

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (028-496-001) Williams 

ED 532 Introduction to Educational Inquiry 3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 

1140-1310(028-532-001) Staff 

ED 54 IB Practicum in Education Administration 1-6 

Prerequisites: ED 550 and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (028-541-001) Taylor 

ED 590 Special Problems in Guidance Maximum 6 

Prerequisites: Six hours graduate work in department or equivalent and Consent of 

Instructor 
Hours arranged (028-590-001) 



ED 592 Special Problems in Mathematics Teaching 

Prerequisite: ED 471 or equivalent 
Hours arranged (028-592-001) 

ED 593A Special Problems in Occupational Education: 

Teaching Technical Content in Agricultural Education 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, PBS status, or Graduate standing in OED 

1600-1900(028-593-001) 

July 5-July 25— Three-Week Course— Final Exam July 25 

ED 593B Special Problems in Occupational Education: Advanced 
Teaching Procedures in Agricultural Education 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, PBS status, or Graduate standing in OED 

0900-1200 (028-593-002) 

July 5-July 25— Three- Week Course— Final Exam July 25 

ED 593C Special Problems in Occupational Education: Advanced 
Microcomputer Applications in Occupational Education 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, PBS status, or Graduate standing in OED 

1300-1600 (028-593-003) 

July 5-July 25— Three-Week Course— Final Exam July 25 

ED 593D Special Problems in Occupational Education: Marketing 
Education and Training Programs 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, PBS status, or Graduate standing in OED 
1730-2130 WTh (028-593-004) 



Staff 
1-3 

Staff 
3 

Malpiedi 



Flowers 



Malpiedi 



ED 594 Special Problems in Science Teaching 

Prerequisite: ED 476 or equivalent 
Hours arranged (028-594-001) 

ED 596 Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 
Education 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 
Hours arranged (028-596-001) 

ED 597 Special Problems in Education 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 
Hours arranged (028-597-001) 



Burrow 
1-6 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 
1-3 

Exum 



62 



ED 598 Special Problems in Curriculum and Instruction 1-6 

Prerequisites: Six hours of ED or PSY and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (028-598-001) Staff 

ED 598D Special Problems in Curriculum and Instruction: 6 

Teaching of Writing Institute (Capital Area Writing Project) 

Prerequisites: Six hours of ED or PSY and Consent of Instructor 

0815-1530 (028-598-005) Pritchard 

0815-1530 (028-598-006) Buckner 

June 27-July 26— Four-Week Course— Final Exam July 26 

(See "Special Courses and Institutes," page 30) 

ED 598J Special Problems in Curriculum and Instruction: 3 

Counseling the Gifted Individual 

Prerequisites: Six hours of ED or PSY and Consent of Instructor 

1300-1600 (028-598-007) Aubrecht 

June 20-July 11— Three-Week Course— Final Exam July 11 

(See "Special Courses and Institutes," page 28) 

ED 5981 Special Problems in Curriculum and Instruction: 3 

Intelligence 

Prerequisites: Six hours of ED or PSY and Consent of Instructor 

0900-1200 (028-598-008) Aubrecht 

June 20-July 11— Three-Week Course — Final Exam July 11 

(See "Special Courses and Institutes," page 28) 

ED 599 Research Projects in Education 1-3 

Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor; ED 532 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (028-599-001) Exum 

ED 599A Research Projects in Education: Adult and 1-3 

Community College Education 

Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor; ED 532 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (028-599-002) Staff 

ED 621 Internship in Education 3-9 

Prerequisites: Nine credit hours in graduate level courses and Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (028-621-001) Exum 

ED 636 Observation and Supervised Field Work 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (028-636-001) Staff 

ED 693 Advanced Special Problems in Occupational 3 

Education: Clinical Evaluation of Students 

Prerequisite: Master's degree in Vocational field or Consent of Instructor 

1710-2030 MW (028-693-001) Davis 

ED 699 Thesis and Dissertation Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: 15 hours of education; Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (028-699-001) Exum 

ED 699A Thesis and Dissertation Research: Adult Credits Arranged 

and Community College Education 

Prerequisites: 15 hours of education; Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (028-699-002) Staff 



63 



ADULT EDUCATION SESSION 

The following courses will be taught in the three-week Regional Summer School of 
Adult, Extension and Community College Educators (June 6-24). Special registra- 
tion procedures are required. See page 28 for additional information. 

ED 596C Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 3 

Education: Instructional Leadership in the 
Community College 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status. Limited to participants in the Instruc- 
tional Administrators Leadership Institute or by Consent of Instructor 



0845-1630 

June 13-June 24— Two- Week Course- 



Final Exam June 24 



ED 596D Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 
Education: Extension Education Methods 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 

0830-1200 

June 6-June 24— Three-Week Course— Final Exam June 24 

ED 5961 Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 
Education: Emerging Issues in Adult Education 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 

1300-1630 

June 6-June 24— Three- Week Course— Final Exam June 24 

ED 596J Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 
Education: Leading and Working with People 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 

0830-1200 

June 6-June 10— One- Week Course— Final Exam June 10 

ED 596K Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 
Education: Developing Supervisory Skills 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 

0830-1200 

June 13-June 17— One- Week Course— Final Exam June 17 

ED 596M Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 
Education: Improving Administrative Skills 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 

0830-1200 

June 20-June 24— One- Week Course— Final Exam June 24 



Tollefson 



Lamble 



Griffith 



Joseph 



Joseph 



Joseph 



ED 696 Seminar in Adult and Community College Education: 2 

Leadership Strategies 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Limited to participants in the Instructional Administra- 
tors Leadership Institute or by Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged Tollefson 

June 13-June 24— Two- Week Course— Final Exam June 24 



64 



English 
FIRST SESSION 
FRESHMAN ENGLISH 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

General University requirement. Successful completion of ENG 1 1 1 requires a grade of C 
or better. 

0800-0930 (036-111-001) (036-111-004) Staff 

0950-1120 (036-111-002) (036-111-005) Staff 

1140-1310 (036-111-003) (036-111-006) Staff 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

General University requirement. 

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENG 111. 

0800-0930 (036-112-001) (036-112-004) (036-112-007) Staff 

0950-1120 (036-112-002) (036-112-005) (036-112-008) Staff 

1140-1310 (036-112-003) (036-112-006) Staff 

WRITING AND LANGUAGE 

The prerequisite for all courses in writing and language at the 200-level and above is the 
completion of ENG 111 and ENG 112. 

ENG 214 Introduction to Editing 3 

1140-1310 (036-214-001) Kochersberger 

ENG 215 Principles of News and Article Writing 3 

0950-1120 (036-215-001) Kochersberger 

ENG 221 Communication for Business and Management 3 

0800-0930 (036-221-001) Covington 

ENG 321 The Communication of Technical Information 3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

0800-0930 (036-321-001) (036-321-004) Staff 

0950-1120 (036-321-002) (036-321-005) Staff 

1140-1310 (036-321-003) (036-321-006) Staff 

LITERATURE 

The prerequisite for all literature courses is the completion of ENG 111 and ENG 112. 

ENG 205 Studies in Great Works of Literature 3 

The courses ENG 205, ENG 206. ENG 207, and ENG 208 are designed for students not 

enrolled in Humanities and Social Sciences. 

0950-1120(036-205-001) Staff 

ENG 208 Studies in Fiction 3 

The courses ENG 205, ENG 206, ENG 207, and ENG 208 are designed for students not 
enrolled in Humanities and Social Sciences. 

0800-0930 (036-208-001) Staff 

0950-1120(036-208-002) Staff 

1140-1310 (036-208-003) Staff 

ENG 251 Major British Writers 3 

Credit will not be given for both ENG 251 and either ENG 261 or ENG 262. 

0800-0930 (036-251-001) Staff 

1140-1310(036-251-002) Staff 



65 



ENG 252 Major American Writers 3 

Credit will not be given for both ENG 252 and either ENG 265 or ENG 266. 

0950-1120(036-252-001) Staff 

ENG 261 English Literature I 3 

1140-1310(036-261-001) Staff 

ENG 262 English Literature II 3 

0950-1120(036-262-001) Staff 

ENG 265 American Literature I 3 

0800-0930 (036-265-001) Staff 

0950-1120 (036-265-002) (036-265-004) Staff 

1140-1310(036-265-003) Staff 

ENG 266 American Literature II 3 

0800-0930 (036-266-001) Staff 

0950-1120(036-266-002) Staff 

1140-1310(036-266-003) Staff 

ENG 298 Special Projects in English 1-3 

Hours arranged (036-298-001) Staff 

ENG 324 Modern English 3 

0950-1120(036-324-001) Fennell 

ENG 487 Shakespeare, The Later Plays 3 

Corequisite: A 200-level English course is desirable preparation 

0800-0930 (036-487-001) Hester 

ENG 498 Special Topics in English 1-6 

Prerequisite: Six hours in ENG above the freshman level. 

Hours arranged (036-498-001) Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

The prerequisite for all 600-level English courses is graduate standing unless additional 
prerequisites are noted. 

ENG 662 Eighteenth-Century English Literature 3 

1140-1310(036-662-001) Durant 

ENG 692 Special Topics in American Literature 3 

Prerequisite: Consent of seminar chairman. 

Hours arranged (036-692-001) Staff 

ENG 698 Bibliography and Methodology 1-3 

Hours arranged (036-698-001) Staff 

ENG 699 Research in Literature (Thesis) Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of graduate adviser. 

Hours arranged (036-699-001) Thesis Director 

SECOND SESSION 

FRESHMAN ENGLISH 

ENG 110 Developmental English 3 

Credit is not applicable toward graduation in any curriculum. Students placed in ENG 110 

must receive a grade of S in order to advance to ENG 111. 

0800-0930(036-110-001) Staff 



66 



ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

General University requirement. Successful completion of ENG 111 requires a grade of C 
or better 

0800-0930 (036-111-001) (036-111-004) Staff 

0950-1120 (036-111-002) (036-111-005) Staff 

1140-1310 (036-111-003) (036-111-006) Staff 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

General University requirement. 

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENG 111. 

0800-0930 (036-112-001) (036-112-004) (036-112-007) Staff 

0950-1120 (036-112-002) (036-112-005) Staff 

1140-1310 (036-112-003) (036-112-006) Staff 

WRITING AND LANGUAGE 

The prerequ isite for all courses in writing and language at the 200-level and above is the 
completion of ENG 111 and ENG 112. 

ENG 221 Communication for Business and Management 3 

0800-0930 (036-221-001) Weinberg 

ENG 321 The Communication of Technical Information 3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

0800-0930 (036-321-001) (036-321-004) Staff 

0950- 1 120 (036-32 1-002) (036-32 1-005) Staff 

1140-1310(036-321-003) Staff 

LITERATURE 

The prerequisite for all literature courses is the completion of ENG 111 and ENG 112. 

ENG 205 Studies in Great Works of Literature 3 

The courses ENG 205, ENG 206, ENG 207, and ENG 208 are designed for students not 

enrolled in Humanities and Social Sciences. 

0950-1120 (036-205-001) Staff 

ENG 208 Studies in Fiction 3 

The courses ENG 205, ENG 206, ENG 207, and ENG 208 are designed for students not 
enrolled in Humanities and Social Sciences. 

0800-0930 (036-208-001) Staff 

1140-1310(036-208-002) Staff 

ENG 251 Major British Writers 3 

Credit will not be given for both ENG 251 and either ENG 261 or ENG 262. 

0950-1120(036-251-001) Staff 

ENG 252 Major American Writers 3 

Credit will not be given for both ENG 252 and either ENG 265 or ENG 266. 

1140-1310(036-252-001) Staff 

ENG 261 English Literature I 3 

0800-0930 (036-261-001) Staff 

ENG 262 English Literature II 3 

0950-1120(036-262-001) Staff 

ENG 265 American Literature I 3 

0800-0930 (036-265-001) Staff 

0950-1120(036-265-002) Staff 

1140-1310(036-265-003) Staff 



67 



ENG 266 American Literature II 3 

0800-0930 (036-266-001) Staff 

0950-1120(036-266-002) Staff 

1140-1310(036-266-003) Staff 

ENG 298 Special Projects in English 1-3 

Hours arranged (036-298-001) Staff 

ENG 375 The Film: A Literary Medium 3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

1140-1310(036-375-001) Staff 

ENG 463 The Victorian Period 3 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of English literature 

1140-1310 (036-463-001) Harrison 

ENG 498 Special Topics in English 1-6 

Prerequisite: Six hours in ENG above the freshman level. 

Hours arranged (036-498-001) Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

The prerequisite for all 600-level English courses is graduate standing unless additional 
prerequisites are noted. 

ENG 655 American Romantic Period 3 

0800-0930 (036-655-001) Stein 

ENG 670 Twentieth-Century British Prose 3 

0950-1120(036-670-001) Halperen 

ENG 692 Special Topics in American Literature 3 

Prerequisite: Consent of seminar chairman 

Hours arranged (036-692-001) Staff 

ENG 693 Special Topics in English Literature: 3 
Fantasy and Science Fiction 

Prerequisite: Consent of seminar chairman. 

1140-1310 (036-693-001) W. Meyers 

ENG 698 Bibliography and Methodology 1-3 

Hours arranged (036-698-001) Staff 

ENG 699 Research in Literature (Thesis) Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of graduate adviser. 

Hours arranged (036-699-001) Thesis Director 

TEN-WEEK SESSION 

FRESHMAN ENGLISH 

ENG 11 IE Composition and Rhetoric 3 

General University requirement. Successful completion of ENG 111 requires a grade of C 

or better 

1745-1930 MW (036-111-051) Staff 

ENG 112E Composition and Reading 3 

General University requirement. 

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENG 111. 

1745-1930 MW (036-112-051) Staff 

1945-2130 MW (036-112-052) Staff 



68 



WRITING AND LANGUAGE 

The prerequisite for all courses in writing and language at the 200-level and above is the 
completion of ENG 111 and ENG 112. 

ENG 321E The Communication of Technical Information 3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

1745-1930 TuTh (036-321-051) Staff 

1945-2130 TuTh (036-321-052) Staff 

LITERATURE 

The prerequisite for all literature courses is the completion of ENG 111 and ENG 112. 

ENG 208E Studies in Fiction 3 

The courses ENG 205, ENG 206, ENG 207, and ENG 208 are designed for students not 

enrolled in Humanities and Social Sciences. 

1945-2130 MW (036-208-051) Staff 

ENG 26 IE English Literature I 3 

1745-1930 MW (036-261-051) Staff 

ENG 265E American Literature I 3 

1745-1930 TuTh (036-265-051) Staff 

ENG 266E American Literature II 3 

1945-2130 TuTh (036-266-051) Staff 

Entomology 

FIRST SESSION 

ENT 590 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (038-590-001) Staff 

ENT 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (038-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

ENT 590 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (038-590-001) Staff 

ENT 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (038-699-001) Staff 

Foreign Languages & Literatures 
FRENCH 
FIRST SESSION 

$ FLF 101 Elementary French I 3 

0800-0930 (064-101-001) Hammond 

0950-1120(064-101-002) Paschal 

0800-0930 (064-101-003) Stack 

$ FLF 101E Elementary French I 3 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (064-101-004) Staff 



69 



$ FLF 102 Elementary French II 3 

Prerequisite: FLF 101 

1140-1310(064-102-001) Paschal 

1140-1310(064-102-002) Staff 

FLF 201 Intermediate French I 3 

Prerequisite: FLF 102 or FLF 105 

0950-1120(064-201-001) Hammond 

0950-1120(064-201-002) Stack 

SECOND SESSION 

$ FLF 102 Elementary French II 3 

Prerequisite: FLF 101 

0800-0930 (064-102-001) Paliyenko 

0800-0930 (064-102-002) Staff 

$ FLF 102E Elementary French II 3 

Prerequisite: FLF 101 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (064-102-003) Ryan 

FLF 201 Intermediate French I 3 

Prerequisite: FLF 102 or FLF 105 

0950-1120(064-201-001) Paliyenko 

0950-1120(064-201-002) Staff 

FLF 202 Intermediate French II 3 

Prerequisite: FLF 201 

1140-1310(064-202-001) Ryan 



GERMAN 



FIRST SESSION 



$ FLG 101 Elementary German I 3 

0950-1120 (065-101-001) Simonsen 

1140-1310(065-101-002) Jezierski 

FLG 201 Intermediate German I 3 

Prerequisite: FLG 102. Credit for both FLG 201 and FLG 210 is not allowed. 

0800-0930 (065-201-001) Simonsen 

SECOND SESSION 

$ FLG 102 Elementary German II 3 

Prerequisite: FLG 101 

0950-1120(065-102-001) Tschacher 

1140-1310(065-102-002) Tschacher 

SPANISH 
FIRST SESSION 

$ FLS 101 Elementary Spanish I 3 

0800-0930 (068-101-001) Gonzalez 

0950-1120(068-101-002) Gonzalez 

0950-1120(068-101-003) Jezierski 

1545-1730 MTuWTh (068-101-004) Alonso 

1140-1310(068-101-005) Kelly 



70 



$ FLS 102 Elementary Spanish II 

Prerequisite: FLS 101 
0800-0930 (068-102-001) 
0950-1120(068-102-002) 
0950-1120(068-102-003) 
1140-1310(068-102-004) 

$ FLS 201 Intermediate Spanish I 

Prerequisite: FLS 102 or FLS 105 

0950-1120(068-201-001) 

0950-1120(068-201-002) 

1140-1310(068-201-004) 

1140-1310(068-201-005) 

$ FLS 201E Intermediate Spanish I 

Prerequisite: FLS 102 or FLS 105 
1745-1930 MTuWTh (068-201-003) 

FLS 304 Modern Latin American Literature 

Prerequisite: FLS 202 or equivalent 
1545-1730 MTuWTh (068-304-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

$ FLS 101 Elementary Spanish I 

0800-0930 (068-101-001) 
0950-1120(068-101-002) 

$ FLS 102 Elementary Spanish II 

Prerequisite: FLS 101 
0800-0930 (068-102-001) 
0950-1120(068-102-002) 
0950-1120(068-102-003) 
1140-1310(068-102-004) 

$ FLS 201 Intermediate Spanish I 

Prerequisite: FLS 102 or FLS 105 
0800-0930 (068-201-001) 
0950-1120(068-201-002) 
0950-1120(068-201-003) 
1140-1310(068-201-004) 

FLS 202 Intermediate Spanish II 

Prerequisite: FLS 201 
0950-1120(068-202-001) 



Lioret 
Lioret 

Navey 
Navey 



Wright 
Feeny 

Wright 
Feeny 



Alonso 
3 

Kelly 



3 
Matos 
Matos 



Arias 

Arias 

Castro 

Castro 



Grace 

Grace 

Malaxecheverria 

Malaxecheverria 

3 
Alder 



Forestry 



FIRST SESSION 



$ FOR 111 Introduction to Field Forestry 

Summer Pre-Camp (May 9-May 20) 

Open only to students transferring to a forestry major. 

0800-1700(040-111-001) 

FOR 491 Senior Problems in Forestry 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 
Hours arranged (040-491-001) 

FOR 592 Special Topics in Forestry 

Hours arranged (040-592-001) 



Staff 
1-6 

Staff 

Credits Arranged 
Staff 



71 



FOR 691 Graduate Seminar 1 

Hours arranged (040-691-001) Perry 

FOR 692 Advanced Topics in Forestry Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (040-692-001) Staff 

FOR 699 Research in Forestry Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (040-699-00 1 ) Staff 

SECOND SESSION. 

FOR 491 Senior Problems in Forestry 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (040-491-001) Staff 

FOR 592 Special Topics in Forestry Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (040-592-001) Staff 

FOR 691 Graduate Seminar 1 

Hours arranged (040-691-001) Perry 

FOR 692 Advanced Topics in Forestry Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (040-692-001) Staff 

FOR 699 Research in Forestry Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (040-699-001) Staff 

TEN-WEEK SESSION 

$ FOR 204 Silviculture 2 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in FOR; meet Summer Camp eligibility standards 

0800-1700 (040-204-051) Jervis 

$ FOR 261 Forest Communities 2 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in FOR: meet eligibility requirements for Summer Camp 

0800-1700 (040-261-051) Braham 

$ FOR 264 Forest Pest Management 1 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in FOR; meet Summer Camp eligibility standards 

0800-1700 (040-264-051) Farrier/Grand 

$ FOR 274 Mapping and Mensuration 4 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in FOR; meet Summer Camp eligibility standards 

0800-1700 (040-274-051) Jervis/Steensen 

$ FOR (FW) 310 Fisheries and Wildlife Inventory and Management 6 

(See Fisheries and Wildlife) 

Note: See page 31 for course "Forestry and Wildlife Concepts for Biologists" offered at 
Highlands Biological Station. 

Food Science 
FIRST SESSION 

FS 491 Special Topics in Food Science 1-6 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours of Food Science and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (039-491-001) Staff 

FS 591 Special Problems in Food Science 1-6 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (039-591-001) Staff 



72 



FS 691 Special Research Problems in Food Science 

Hours arranged (039-691-001) 

FS 699 Research in Food Science 

Hours arranged (039-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

FS (ANS, NTR) 301 Modern Nutrition 

(See Animal Science) 

FS 491 Special Topics in Food Science 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours of Food Science and Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (039-491-001) 

FS 591 Special Problems in Food Science 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (039-591-001) 

FS 691 Special Research Problems in Food Science 

Hours arranged (039-691-001) 

FS 699 Research in Food Science 

Hours arranged (039-699-001) 



Credits Arranged 
Staff 

Credits Arranged 
Staff 



1-6 

Staff 
1-6 

Staff 

Credits Arranged 
Staff 

Credits Arranged 
Staff 



Fisheries and Wildlife 



FIRST SESSION 



FW (ZO) 221 Conservation of Natural Resources 

0950-1120(051-221-001) 

TEN-WEEK SESSION 

$ FW (FOR) 310 Fisheries and Wildlife Inventory and Management 

Summer Camp 

Prerequisites: FW (ZO) 353 or FW (ZO) 420; Junior or Senior standing 

0800-1700 (051-310-051) 



3 

Staff 



6 

Staff 



Graphic Communications 



FIRST SESSION 



GC 101 Engineering Graphics I 

0800-0930 (098-101-001) 
0800-0930 (098-101-002) 
0950-1120(098-101-003) 
0950-1120(098-101-004) 

SECOND SESSION 

GC 101 Engineering Graphics I 

0800-0930 (098-101-001) 
0800-0930 (098-101-002) 
0950-1120(098-101-003) 
0950-1120(098-101-004) 



2 
Hilliard 

Vander Wall 
Hilliard 

Vander Wall 



Freeman 
Markley 

Freeman 
Markley 



73 



Genetics 
FIRST SESSION 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 3 

Prerequisite: Students should have Sophomore standing 

0800-0930(041-301-001) McKenzie 

0950-1120(041-301-002) McKenzie 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 3 

Prerequisites: BS 100, Junior standing 

1140-1310(041-411-001) Staff 

GN 695 Special Problems in Genetics 1-3 

Prerequisites: Advanced Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (041-695-001) Staff 

GN 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, Consent of Advisor 

Hours arranged (041-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

GN 695 Special Problems in Genetics 1-3 

Prerequisites: Advanced Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (041-695-001) Staff 

GN 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, Consent of Advisor 

Hours arranged (041-699-001) Staff 

History 
FIRST SESSION 

HI 205 Western Civilization Since 1400 3 

1140-1310 (044-205-001) Staff 

HI 207 Ancient World to 180 A.D. 3 

0800-0930 (044-207-001) Sack 

0950-1120(044-207-002) Sack 

HI 210 Modern Europe 1815-Present 3 

0950-1120(044-210-001) Vincent 

HI 233 The World in the 20th Century 3 

0800-0930 (044-233-001) Vincent 

HI 244 United States Since 1914 3 

0800-0930 (044-244-001) Hobos 

0950-1120(044-244-002) Wishy 

HI 275 Introduction to History of South and East Africa 3 

0950-1120(044-275-001) Vickery 

HI 452 Recent America 3 

Prerequisite: Three hours of History 

0950-1120(044-452-001) Hobbs 

HI 476 Leadership in Modern Africa 3 

Prerequisite: Three hours of History 

1140-1310 (044-476-001) Vickery 



74 



HI 498 Independent Study in History 

Prerequisite: Three hours of History 
Hours arranged (044-498-001) 



1-6 
Staff 



HI 576 Leadership in Modern Africa 3 

Prerequisite: Six hours of advanced History (400-level or above) or equivalent. Credit in 

both HI 476 and HI 576 is not allowed. 
1140-1310(044-576-001) Vickery 



HI 685 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 
Hours arranged (044-685-001) 

HI 691 Practicum in Applied History 

Prerequisites: HI 601, HI 602, HI 685 
Hours arranged (044-691-001) 

HI 699 Research in History 

Prerequisite: Six hours of advanced History or equivalent 
Hours arranged (044-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

HI 208 The Middle Ages 

0800-0930 (044-208-001) 
0950-1120(044-208-002) 

HI 209 Europe, Renaissance to Waterloo, 1300-1815 

1140-1310(044-209-001) 

HI 216 Latin America Since 1826 

0950-1120(044-216-001) 

HI 242 United States: 1783-1845 

0950-1120(044-242-001) 

HI 243 United States: 1845-1914 

0950-1120(04,4-243-001) 
1140-1310 (044-243-002) 

HI 244 United States Since 1914 

0800-0930 (044-244-001) 

HI 333 History of American Sport 

0800-0930(044-333-001) 

HI (EB) 370 The Rise of Industrialism 

(See Economics and Business) 



1-6 

Staff 

1-6 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 



3 

Newby 
Newby 

3 

Staff 

3 
Beezley 

3 
King 

3 

Smith 

King 

3 
Harris 

3 
Beezley 



HI 446 Civil War and Reconstruction 3 

Prerequisite: Three hours of History. Credit for both HI 446 and HI 546 will not be allowed. 
0950-1120 (044-446-001) Harris 

HI 461 Civilization of the Old South 3 

Prerequisite: Three hours of Historv. Credit for both HI 461 and HI 561 will not be allowed. 
1140-1310 (044-461-001) Smith 



HI 498 Independent Study in History 

Prerequisite: Three hours of History 
Hours arranged (044-498-001) 



1-6 
Staff 



75 






HI 546 Civil War and Reconstruction 3 

Prerequisite: Six hours of advanced History. Credit for both HI 446 and HI 546 will not 

be allowed. 

0950-1120(044-546-001) Harris 

HI 561 Civilization of the Old South 3 

Prerequisite: Six hours of advanced History (400-level or above) or equivalent. Credit for 

both HI 461 and HI 561 will not be allowed. 

1140-1310(044-561-001) Smith 

HI 685 Independent Study 1-6 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 

Hours arranged (044-685-001) Staff 

HI 691 Practicum in Applied History 1-6 

Prerequisites: HI 601. HI 602, HI 685 

Hours arranged (044-691-001) Staff 

HI 699 Research in History Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Six hours of advanced History or equivalent 

Hours arranged (044-699-001) Staff 

Horticultural Science 

FIRST SESSION 

$ HS 400 Residential Landscaping 6 

Prerequisites: DF 234; HS 211, HS 212, HS 342; HS 416 or DN 433; SSC 200; DN 257, DN 
430. Seniors in the Landscape Horticulture area of concentration given 
priority. 

0900-1400 (045-400-001) Hooker 

HS 495 Special Topics in Horticultural Science 1-6 

Hours arranged (045-495-001) Staff 

HS 595 Special Topics in Horticultural Science 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor , 

Hours arranged (045-595-001) Staff 

HS 599 Research Principles Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (045-599-00 1 ) Staff 

HS 695 Graduate Topics in Horticultural Science 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (045-695-00 1 ) Staff 

HS 699 Research Credits Arranged 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Horticulture, Consent of Advisory 

Committee Chairman 

Hours arranged (045-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

HS 495 Special Topics in Horticultural Science 1-6 

Hours arranged (045-495-00 1 ) Staff 

HS 595 Special Topics in Horticultural Science 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (045-595-001) Staff 



76 



HS 599 Research Principles Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (045-599-00 1 ) Staff 

HS 695 Graduate Topics in Horticultural Science 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (045-695-001) Staff 

HS 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Horticulture, Consent of Advisory 

Committee Chairman 
Hours arranged (045-699-001) Staff 

ADULT EDUCATION SESSION 

*HS 595A Special Topics in Horticultural Science: Production 3 

Maintenance and Marketing of Quality Horticultural Crops 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

0900-1200-MTuThF Wilson 

and 
0900-1700 W 
June 6-June 24 — Three- Week Course — Final Exam June 24 

*Course taught in the three-week Regional Summer School of Adult, Extension and 
Community College Educators (June 6-24). Special registration procedures are 
required. See page 28 for additional information. 

Industrial Arts 
FIRST SESSION 

$IA 115 Wood Processing I 3 

1020-1310(047-115-001) DeLuca 

$ IA 122 Metal Technology I 3 

0750-0940 (047-122-001) Haynie 

IA 590 Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts: Advanced Technology 3 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and Consent of Instructor 

1630-1800 (047-590-001) DeLuca 

SECOND SESSION 

$IA 115 Wood Processing I 3 

0750-0940 (047-115-001) Troxler 

$ IA 351 General Ceramics 3 

1020-1310 (047-351-001) Troxler 

Industrial Engineering 
FIRST SESSION 

IE 311 Engineering Economic Analysis 3 

Prerequisite: MA 102 (non-engineering students may use MA 112 or MA 113) 
0800-0930(049-311-001) Liggett 

$ IE 361 Deterministic Models in Industrial Engineering 3 

Prerequisite: MA 303 or MA 405. For IE, ECE, and CSC majors and minors only. 
0800-0930 (049-361-001) Bernhard 



77 



$ IE 452 Ergonomics 3 

Corequisite: IE 352. For IE and FMM majors and IE minors onlv. 

LR 0950-1 120 (049-452-001) Ayoub 

LB Hours arranged (049-452-101) 

IE 495 Project Work in Industrial Engineering 1-6 

Prerequisites: Junior standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (049-495-001) Staff 

IE 498 Senior Design Project 3 

Prerequisites: IE 308, IE 311, IE 441, IE 443, IE 452, IE 453 

Hours arranged (049-498-001) Ayoub 

IE 591 Project Work 1-6 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (049-591-001) Staff 

IE 651 Special Studies in Industrial Engineering Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (049-651-001) Staff 

IE 699 Industrial Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (049-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

IE 311 Engineering Economic Analysis 3 

Prerequisite: MA 102 (non-engineering students may use MA 112 or MA 113) 
0800-0930(049-311-001) Canada 

IE 443 Quality Control 3 

Prerequisite: ST 361 

LR 0800-0930 (049-443-001) Tye-Coleman 

PR 1340-1550 MW (049-443-201) 

$ IE 453 Facilities Design 3 

Prerequisites: IE 351 and IE 352 

LR 0950-1120 (049-453-001) Canada 

LB Hours arranged (049-453-101) 

IE 495 Project Work in Industrial Engineering 1-6 

Prerequisites: Junior standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (049-495-001) Staff 

IE 591 Project Work 1-6 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (049-591-001) Staff 

IE 651 Special Studies in Industrial Engineering Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (049-651-001) Staff 

IE 699 Industrial Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (049-699-00 1 ) Staff 



78 



Landscape Architecture 
FIRST SESSION 

LAR 494 Internship in Landscape Architecture 3-6 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in Landscape Architecture; 3.0 GPA or better; and approval 

of department head 

Maximum 6 credit hours 

Hours arranged (052-494-001) Dalton 

LAR 495 Independent Study in Landscape Architecture 1-3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in Landscape Architecture; 3.0 GPA or better; and approval 

of department head 

Maximum 6 credit hours 

Hours arranged (052-495-001) Dalton 

LAR 595 Independent Study 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (052-595-001) Dalton 

LAR 691 Degree Seminar 

Prerequisite: Three LAR 600 studios 

Hours arranged (052-691-001) Dalton 

$ LAR 698 Advanced Research Project 2-6 

Prerequisite: Two LAR 600 studios or Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (052-698-001) Dalton 

SECOND SESSION 

LAR 494 Internship in Landscape Architecture 3-6 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in Landscape Architecture; 3.0 GPA or better; and approval 

of department head 
Maximum 6 credit hours 
Hours arranged (052-494-001) Dalton 

LAR 495 Independent Study in Landscape Architecture 1-3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in Landscape Architecture; 3.0 GPA or better; and approval 

of department head 

Maximum 6 credit hours 

Hours arranged (052-495-001) Dalton 

LAR 595 Independent Study 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (052-595-001) Dalton 

LAR 691 Degree Seminar 

Prerequisite: Three LAR 600 studios 

Hours arranged (052-691-001) Dalton 

$ LAR 698 Advanced Research Project 2-6 

Prerequisite: Two LAR 600 studios or Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (052-698-001) Dalton 



79 



Mathematics 
FIRST SESSION 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

Credit is not allowed for both MA 100 and MA 111. For students in Engineering, Physical 
and Mathematical Sciences, Design, Biological and Agricultural Engineering (Science 

program), Biological Sciences (all options), and Mathematics Education, Science Educa- 
tion, credit in MA 111 does not count toward graduation requirements. 

0730-0940 (054-111-001) (054-111-002) Staff 

1020-1230 (054-111-003) (054-111-004) (054-111-005) Staff 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or equivalent completed in high school 
Credit is not allowed for more than one of MA 141, MA 112, MA 113. 

0730-0940(054-112-001) Staff 

1020- 1230 (054-1 12-002) Staff 

MA 1 13 Elements of Calculus 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or placement via NCSU Math placement exam 

Credit is not allowed in more than one of MA 141, MA 112, MA 113. MA 113 may not be 

substituted for MA 141 as a curricular requirement. 

0730-0940 (054-113-001) (054-113-002) Staff 

MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathematics With Applications 3 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or equivalent completed in high school 

0800-0930 (054-114-001) (054-114-002) Staff 

MA 115 Basic Algebra 4 

Credit in MA 115 is not allowed if student has prior credit for MA 141, MA 111, MA 112, 
MA 113, or MA 114. Credit for graduation is not given for MA 115 in any curricula. 

1020-1230(054-115-001) Kolb 

MA 122 Mathematics of Finance 3 

Prerequisite: MA 115 or equivalent completed in high school 

0800-0930 (054-122-001) (054-122-002) Staff 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 with grade of C or better, or placement via NCSU Mathematics 

Placement Examination. 
Credit not allowed for more than one of MA 141, MA 112, MA 113. 

0730-0940 (054-141-001) (054-141-002) (054-141-003) Staff 

1020-1230 (054-141-004) (054-141-005) (054-141-006) Staff 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 4 

Prerequisite: MA 201 with a grade of C or better. 

MA 202 will not substitute for MA 242. 

0730-0940 (054-202-001) (054-202-002) Staff 

1020-1230 (054-202-003) (054-202-004) Staff 

MA 202S Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 4 

Prerequisite: MA 201S with a grade of C or better. MA 202S will not substitute for MA 242 

0730-0940 (054-202-070) Staff 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 4 

Prerequisite: MA 141 with a grade of C or better 

0730-0940 (054-241-001) (054-241-002) Staff 

1020-1230 (054-241-004) (054-241-005) Staff 

MA 225 Structure of the Real Number System 3 

Prerequisite: MA 201 

0800-0930 (054-225-001) Staff 

80 



MA 301 Introduction to Differential Equations 3 

Prerequisite: Credit for 12 semester hours of calculus. Credit not allowed if MA 241 taken 

previously at NCSU. 
0800-0930 (054-301-001) (054-301-002) Staff 

1140-1310 (054-301-003) (054-301-004) Staff 

MA 405 Introduction to Linear Algebra and Matrices 3 

Prerequisite: One year of calculus 

0800-0930 (054-405-001) (054-405-002) Staff 

1140-1310(054-405-003) Staff 

MA 421 Introduction to Probability 3 

Prerequisite: One year of calculus 

1140-1310 (054-421-001) Staff 

MA 433 History of Mathematics 3 

Prerequisite: One vear of calculus 

0800-0930 (054-433-001) Staff 

MA 501 Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists I 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 or equivalent. Credit for this course and MA 401 is not allowed. 
1140-1310(054-501-001) Staff 

MA 511 Advanced Calculus I 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301. May not be taken for credit bv undergraduate Mathematics majors. 
1140-1310(054-511-001) Staff 

MA 512 Advanced Calculus II 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 

1140-1310(054-512-001) Staff 

MA 513 Introduction to Complex Variables 3 

Prerequisite: MA 202 

0800-0930 (054-513-001) Staff 

MA 697 Master's Project 3 

Hours arranged (054-697-001) Franke 

MA 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (054-699-001) Franke 

SECOND SESSION 

MA 100 Precalculus Trigonometry 2 

Credit not allowed for both MA 100 and MA 111. For students in Engineering, Physical and 
Mathematical Sciences, Design, Biological and Agricultural Engineering (Science pro- 
gram), Biological Sciences (all options), and Mathematics Education, Science Education, 
credit in MA 100 does hot count toward graduation requirements. 
0730-0835 (054-100-001) Staff 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

Credit is not allowed for both MA 100 and MA 111. For students in Engineering, Physical 
and Mathematical Sciences, Design, Biological and Agricultural Engineering (Science 
program). Biological Sciences (all options) and Mathematics Education, Science Educa- 
tion, credit in MA 111 does not count toward graduation requirements. 
0730-0940 (054-111-001) (054-111-002) Staff 

1020-1230 (054-111-004) (054-111-005) (054-111-006) Staff 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or equivalent completed in high school 
Credit is not allowed in more than one of MA 141, MA 112, MA 113. 
1020-1230(054-112-001) Staff 



81 



MA 1 13 Elements of Calculus 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or placement via NCSU Math Placement exam 

Credit is not allowed in more than one of MA 141, MA 112, MA 113. 

MA 113 mav not be substituted for MA 141 as a curricular requirement. 

1020-1230 (054-113-001) (054-113-002) Staff 

MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathematics with Applications 3 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or equivalent completed in high school 

0800-0930 (054-1 14-001) (054-1 14-002) Staff 

MA 115 Basic Algebra 4 

Credit in MA 115 is not allowed if student has prior credit for MA 141, MA 111, MA 112, 
MA 113, or MA 114. Credit toward graduation is not given for MA 115 in any curricula. 

0730-0940(054-115-001) Staff 

1020-1230(054-115-002) Waters 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 with a grade of C or better, or placement via NCSU Mathematics 

Placement Examination. 

Credit not allowed for more than one of MA 141, MA 112, MA 113. 

0730-0940 (054-141-001) Staff 

1020-1230 (054-141-002) (054-141-003) Staff 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 4 

Prerequisite: MA 201 with a grade of C or better. MA 202 will not substitute for MA 242 

0730-0940 (054-202-001) (054-202-002) Staff 

1020-1230 (054-202-003) (054-202-004) Staff 

MA 212 Analytic Geometry and Calculus B 3 

Prerequisite: MA 112 

1140-1310(054-212-001) Staff 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 4 

Prerequisite: MA 141 with a grade of C or better 

0730-0940 (054-241-001) (054-241-002) Staff 

1020-1230 (054-241-003) (054-241-004) Staff 

MA 301 Introduction to Differential Equations 3 

Prerequisite: Credit for 12 semester hours of calculus. Credit not allowed if MA 241 taken 

previously at NCSU. 

0800-0930 (054-301-001) (054-301-002) Staff 

1140-1310 (054-301-003) (054-301-004) Staff 

MA 401 Applied Differential Equations II 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301. Credit for MA 401 and MA 501 will not be given. 

0800-0930 (054-401-001) Staff 

MA 405 Introduction to Linear Algebra and Matrices 3 

Prerequisite: One year of calculus 

0800-0930 (054-405-001) Staff 

1140-1310(054-405-002) Staff 

MA 502 Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists II 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 or equivalent. Any student receiving credit for MA 502 may receive 

credit for, at most, one of the following: MA 405, MA 512, or MA 513. 

1140-1310(054-502-001) Staff 

MA 512 Advanced Calculus II 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 

0800-0930 (054-512-001) Staff 

MA 697 Master's Project 3 

Hours arranged (054-697-001) Staff 

82 



MA 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (054-699-001) Staff 

TEN-WEEK SESSION 

MA 11 IE Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

Credit is not allowed for both MA 100 and MA 111. For students in Engineering, Physical 
and Mathematical Sciences, Design, Biological and Agricultural Engineering (Science 
program), Biological Sciences (all options), and Mathematics Education, Science Educa- 
tion credit in MA 111 does not count toward graduation requirements. 

1915-2150 MW (054-111-051) (054-111-052) Staff 

MA 1 13E Elements of Calculus 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or placement via NCSU Math Placement exam 

Credit is not allowed in more than one of MA 141, MA 112, MA 113. MA 113 may not be 

substituted for MA 141 as a curricular requirement. 

1915-2150 TuTh (054-113-051) Staff 

MA 114E Introduction to Finite Mathematics with Applications 3 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or equivalent completed in high school 

1945-2130 MW (054-114-051) Staff 

MA (CSC) 322 Discrete Mathematical Structures 3 

(See Computer Science) 

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 
FIRST SESSION 

MAE 206 Engineering Statics 3 

Prerequisite: PY 205 

Corequisite: MA 202 

0800-0930 (055-206-001) Brown 

1140-1310 (055-206-002) Staff 

MAE 208 Engineering Dynamics 3 

Prerequisite: MAE 206 or CE 214 

Corequisite: MA 301 

1140-1310(055-208-001) Keltie 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I 3 

Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 208 or PY 202 

0800-0930 (055-301-001) Afify 

0800-0930 (055-301-002) Staff 

0950-1120(055-301-003) Afify 

0950-1120(055-301-004) Staff 

1140-1310(055-301-005) Staff 

1140-1310(055-301-006) Brown 

MAE 302 Engineering Thermodynamics II 3 

Prerequisites: MAE 301, CSC 111 

0800-0930 (055-302-001) Leach 

$ MAE 305 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I 1 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in ME 

1340-1750 TuTh (055-305-001) Batton 

1340-1750 MW (055-305-002) Staff 

1750-2200 MW (055-305-003) Staff 



83 



MAE 308 Fluid Mechanics I 3 

Prerequisites: MA 202; MAE 208 or CE 215 or CE 213; CSC 111 or CSC 101 
Corequisite: MAE 301 

0950-1120(055-308-001) Hodgson 

1140-1310(055-308-002) Staff 

MAE 310 Conduction and Radiation Heat Transfer 3 

Prerequisites: MA 301. MAE 301, CSC 111 

0800-0930 (055-310-001) Staff 

0950-1120(055-310-002) Edwards 

MAE 314 Solid Mechanics 3 

Prerequisites: MAE 206, CE 213 or CE 214 

Corequisite: MAT 201 

0800-0930 (055-314-001) Edwards 

0950-1120 (055-314-002) Silverberg 

MAE 316 Strength of Mechanical Components 3 

Prerequisites: MAE 314, CSC 111; students in ME, AE, NE only 
1140-1310(055-316-001) Staff 

MAE 411 Machine Component Design 3 

Prerequisites: MAE 315, MAE 316 

0800-0930(055-411-001) Maday 

MAE 435 Principles of Automatic Control 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 

0950-1120(055-435-001) Maday 

MAE 586 Project Work in Mechanical Engineering 1-6 

Hours arranged (055-586-001) Staff 

MAE 686 Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (055-686-001) Staff 

MAE 699 Mechanical Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in mechanical engineering and consent of advisor. 
Hours arranged (055-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

MAE 206 Engineering Statics 3 

Prerequisite: PY 205 

Corequisite: MA 202 

0800-0930 (055-206-001) Staff 

1140-1310(055-206-002) Staff 

MAE 208 Engineering Dynamics 3 

Prerequisite: MAE 206 or CE 214 

Corequisite: MA 301 

0800-0930 (055-208-001) Staff 

MAE 261 Aerospace Vehicle Performance 3 

Prerequisites: MA 201, PY 205 

0800-0930 (055-261-001) Hale 



84 



MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I 3 

Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 208 or PY 202 

0800-0930 (055-301-001) Boles 

0800-0930 (055-301-002) Johnson 

0950-1120(055-301-003) Boles 

0950-1120(055-301-004) Staff 

1140-1310(055-301-005) Staff 

MAE 302 Engineering Thermodynamics II 3 

Prerequisites: MAE 301, CSC 111 

1140-1310 (055-302-001) Johnson 

$ MAE 306 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II 1 

Prerequisite: MAE 305 

1340-1750 TuTh (055-306-001) Batton 

1340-1750 MW (055-306-002) Staff 

1750-2200 MW (055-306-003) Staff 

MAE 308 Fluid Mechanics I 3 

Prerequisites: MA 202; MAE 208 or CE 215 or CE 213; CSC 111 or CSC 101 

Corequisite: MAE 301 

0800-0930 (055-308-001) Smetana 

MAE 314 Solid Mechanics 3 

Prerequisites: MAE 206, CE 213 or CE 214 

Corequisite: MAT 201 

0950-1120(055-314-001) Smetana 

1140-1310 (055-314-002) Staff 

MAE 410 Convective Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow 3 

Prerequisites: MAE 301, MAE 308 

Corequisite: MAE 310 

0950-1120(055-410-001) Leach 

MAE 462 Flight Vehicle Stability and Control 3 

Prerequisites: MAE 261, MAE 435 

0950-1120(055-462-001) Hale 

MAE 586 Project Work in Mechanical Engineering 1-6 

Hours arranged (055-586-001) Staff 

MAE 686 Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (055-686-001) Staff 

MAE 699 Mechanical Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in mechanical engineering and consent of advisor. 
Hours arranged (055-699-001) Staff 

TEN-WEEK SESSION 

MAE 315 Dynamics of Machines 3 

Prerequisites: MAE 208, CSC 111 

1000-1115 MWF (055-315-051) Staff 

Materials Science and Engineering 
FIRST SESSION 

MAT 201 Structure and Properties of Engineering Materials 3 

Prerequisite: CH 105 

LR 1200-1330 (061-201-001) Staff 

PR i340-1620 TuTh (061-201-201) (061-201-202) 

85 



$ MAT 210 Experiments in Materials Engineering 1 

Corequisite: MAT 201 

LB 1340-1650 MWF (061-210-001) Staff 

MAT 495 Materials Engineering Projects 1-6 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing 

Hours arranged (061-495-001) Staff 

MAT 595 Advanced Materials Experiments 1-3 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (06 1-595-00 1 ) Staff 

MAT 699 Materials Science and Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (061-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

$ MAT 200 Mechanical Properties of Structural Materials 2 

Prerequisites: CH 105 and the first course in Engineering Mechanics 

LR 1020-1 120 MWF (061-200-001) Fahmy 

LB 1340-1650 MWF (061-200-101) (061-200-102) 

MAT 201 Structure and Properties of Engineering Materials 3 

Prerequisite: CH 105 

LR 1200-1330 (061-201-001) Fahmy 

PR 1340-1620 TuTh (061-201-201) (061-201-202) 

MAT 495 Materials Engineering Projects 1-6 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing 

Hours arranged (061-495-001) Staff 

MAT 595 Advanced Materials Experiments 1-3 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (061-595-001) Staff 

MAT 699 Materials Science and Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (061-699-001) Staff 

Microbiology 
FIRST SESSION 

MB 490 Special Topics in Microbiology 1-3 

Prerequisites: Three courses in Microbiology and permission of instructor 

Hours arranged (057-490-001) Staff 

MB 590 Topical Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (057-590-001) Staff 

MB 692 Special Problems in Microbiology Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (057-692-001) Staff 

MB 699 Microbiology Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (057-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

$ MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

Prerequisites: BS 100, CH 223 or CH 220 

LR 0950-1 120 (057-401-001) Shore 

LB 1340-1750 TuTh (057-401-101) 



86 



MB 490 Special Topics in Microbiology 1-3 

Prerequisites: Three courses in Microbiology and permission of instructor 

Hours arranged (057-490-001) Staff 

MB 590 Topical Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (057-590-001) Staff 

MB 692 Special Problems in Microbiology Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (057-692-001) Staff 

MB 699 Microbiology Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (057-699-001) Staff 

Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 
EARTH SCIENCE (GEOLOGY/GEOPHYSICS) 
FIRST SESSION 

MEA 101 Introduction to Geology I: Physical 3 

Credit is not allowed for both MEA 101 and MEA 120. Recommended that MEA 110 be 

taken concurrently. 

0800-0930 (053-101-001) Kimberley 

$ MEA 110 Introduction to Geology I: Laboratory 1 

Corequisite: MEA 101 or MEA 120 

1020-1230 MW (053-110-001) Staff 

1340-1550 TuTh (053-110-002) Staff 

MEA 465 Geologic Field Camp I 3 

Prerequisites: MEA 351, MEA 440. MEA 452 

First part of six weeks out-of-state summer field camp. Both MEA 465 and MEA 466 must 

be taken in the same summer. 

Hours arranged (053-465-001) Staff 

MEA 475 Geophysical Field Methods 2 

Prerequisite: MEA 471 

Credit is not allowed for both MEA 475 and MEA 575. 

Hours arranged (053-475-001) Won/Bevis 

MEA 575 Geophysical Field Methods 2 

Prerequisite: MEA 570 

Hours arranged (053-575-001) Won/Bevis 

MEA 593 Special Topics 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (053-593-001) Staff 

MEA 695 Seminar 1 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (053-695-001) Staff 

MEA 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (053-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

MEA 101 Introduction to Geology I: Physical 3 

Credit is not allowed for both MEA 101 and MEA 120. Recommended that MEA 110 be 

taken concurrently. 

0800-0930 (053-101-001) Staff 

87 



$ ME A 110 Introduction to Geology I: Laboratory 1 

Corequisite: MEA 101 or MEA 120 

1020-1230 MW (053-110-001) Staff 

1340-1550 TuTh (053-110-002) Staff 

MEA 466 Geologic Field Camp II 3 

Prerequisite: MEA 465 

Second part of six weeks out-of-state summer field camp. Both MEA 465 and MEA 466 

must be taken in the same summer. 

Hours arranged (053-466-001) Staff 

MEA 593 Special Topics 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (053-593-001) Staff 

MEA 695 Seminar 1 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (053-695-001) Staff 

MEA 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (053-699-001) Staff 

MARINE SCIENCE 
FIRST SESSION 

MEA 593 Special Topics 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (053-593-001) Staff 

MEA 693 Advanced Special Topics 1-3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of staff 

Hours arranged (053-693-001) Staff 

MEA 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of advisory committee 

Hours arranged (053-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

MEA 593 Special Topics 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (053-593-00 1 ) Staff 

MEA 693 Advanced Special Topics 1-3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of staff 

Hours arranged (053-693-001) Staff 

MEA 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of advisory committee 

Hours arranged (053-699-00 1 ) Staff 

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE (METEOROLOGY) 
FIRST SESSION 

MEA 493 Special Topics in Meteorology 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (053-493-001) Staff 



MEA 593 Special Topics 

Prerequisite: Consent of staff 
Hours arranged (053-593-001) 

MEA 695 Seminar 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (053-695-001) 

MEA 699 Research 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of advisory committee 
Hours arranged (053-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

MEA 493 Special Topics in Meteorology 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 
Hours arranged (053-493-001) 

MEA 593 Special Topics 

Prerequisite: Consent of staff 
Hours arranged (053-593-001) 

MEA 695 Seminar 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (053-695-001) 

MEA 699 Research 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of advisory committee 
Hours arranged (053-699-001) 

Music 
FIRST SESSION 

MUS 200 Understanding Music 

0800-0930 (069-200-001) 
0800-0930 (069-200-002) 
0950-1120(069-200-003) 

MUS 210 A Survey of Music in America 

0800-0930 (069-210-001) 

MUS 260 Historv of Jazz 

0950-1120 (069-260-001) 

MUS 320 Music of the Twentieth Century 

0950-1120(069-320-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

MUS 200 Understanding Music 

0800-0930 (069-200-001) 
0950-1120(069-200-002) 
0800-0930 (069-200-003) 
0950-1120(069-200-004) 



1-6 

Staff 

1 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 

1-3 

Staff 
1-6 

Staff 

1 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 



3 

Bliss 
Kramer 
Kramer 

3 
Hammond 

3 

Hammond 



3 

Bliss 



3 

Petters 

Petters 

Ward 

Ward 



FIRST SESSION 



Nuclear Engineering 



$ NE 202 Fundamentals of Nuclear Energy 
Prerequisite: PY 208 
0950-1120(070-202-001) 



4 
Hankins 






89 



NE 491 Special Topics in Nuclear Engineering 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (070-491-001) 

NE 591 Special Topics in Nuclear Engineering I 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (070-591-001) 

NE 691 Advanced Topics in Nuclear Engineering I 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (070-691-001) 

NE 692 Advanced Topics in Nuclear Engineering II 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (070-692-001) 

NE 699 Research in Nuclear Engineering 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (070-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

NE 491 Special Topics in Nuclear Engineering 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (070-491-001) 

NE 591 Special Topics in Nuclear Engineering I 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (070-591-001) 

NE 691 Advanced Topics in Nuclear Engineering I 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (070-691-001) 

NE 692 Advanced Topics in Nuclear Engineering II 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (070-692-001) 

NE 699 Research in Nuclear Engineering 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (070-699-001) 



1-4 

Staff 
3 

Staff 
3 

Staff 
3 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 

1-4 

Staff 
3 

Staff 
3 

Staff 
3 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 



Nutrition 



FIRST SESSION 

NTR 699 Research in Nutrition 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (071-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

NTR (ANS, FS) 301 Modern Nutrition 

(See Animal Science) 

NTR 699 Research in Nutrition 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (071-699-001) 



Credits Arranged 
Staff 



Credits Arranged 
Staff 



90 



Operations Research 
FIRST SESSION 

OR 591 Special Topics in Operations Research 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (073-591-001) Staff 

OR 691 Special Topics in Operations Research 3 

Prerequisites: OR 501, OR (IE, MA) 505 

Hours arranged (073-691-001) Staff 

OR (IE, MA) 692 Special Topics in Mathematical Programming 3 

Prerequisite: OR (IE, MA) 505 

Hours arranged (073-692-001) Staff 

OR 699 Project in Operations Research 1-3 

Hours arranged (073-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

OR 591 Special Topics in Operations Research 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (073-591-001) Staff 

OR 691 Special Topics in Operations Research 3 

Prerequisites: OR 501, OR (IE, MA) 505 

Hours arranged (073-691-001) Staff 

OR (IE, MA) 692 Special Topics in Mathematical Programming 3 

Prerequisite: OR (IE, MA) 505 

Hours arranged (073-692-001) Staff 

OR 699 Project in Operations Research 1-3 

Hours arranged (073-699-001) Staff 

Political Science and Public Administration 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
FIRST SESSION 

PA 590 Readings and Research 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (034-590-001) Staff 

PA 611 Seminar in Public Personnel Management 3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or Management Development Certificate Program and 

six semester hours of 500-level course work 
1830-2100 MTuTh (034-611-001) Sims 

PA 617 Seminar in Organization Theory 3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or Management Development Certificate Program and 

six semester hours of 500-level course work 
0800-0930 (034-617-001) Vasu 

PA 691 Internship in Public Affairs 1-6 

Prerequisite: Minimum 9 hours graduate work 

Hours arranged (034-691-001) Staff 



91 



SECOND SESSION 



*PA 516E Public Policy Analysis 3 

Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate standing including 12 hours of political science, 

Graduate standing or PBS status 
1900-2200 MW (034-516-001) Swiss 



PA 590 Readings and Research 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (034-590-001) 



1-3 
Staff 



PA 612 The Budgetary Process 3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or Management Development Certificate Program and 

six semester hours of 500-level course work 
1630-1830 MTuWTh (034-612-001) Coe 

*PA 614E Management Systems 3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or Management Development Certificate Program and 

six semester hours of 500-level course work 
1900-2200 TuTh (034-614-001) Swiss 

"There will be additional class meetings on July 23 and August 10. The final exami- 
nation will be on August 12. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



FIRST SESSION 



PS 201 Introduction to American Government 

0800-0930 (080-201-001) 
0950-1120(080-201-002) 
0950-1120(080-201-003) 

PS 231 International Relations 

0950-1120(080-231-001) 



PS 331 U.S. Foreign Policy 

0800-0930 (080-331-001) 

PS 361 Introduction to Political Theory 

0800-0930 (080-361-001) 

$ PS 471 Survey Research 

0950-1120(080-471-001) 

PS 490 Readings and Research in Political Science 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 
Hours arranged (080-490-001) 

PS 492 Honors Readings and Thesis in Political Science 

Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program and Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (080-492-001) 

PS 590 Readings and Research 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 
Hours arranged (080-590-001) 

PS 699 Research in Politics 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and approval of advisor 
Hours arranged (080-699-001) 



3 
Pavlik 
Pavlik 
Gilbert 



McClintock 

3 
Gilbert 

3 
Kessler 

3 
Vasu 

1-6 

Staff 
3-6 

Staff 
1-3 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 



92 



SECOND SESSION 

PS 201 Introduction to American Government 3 

0800-0930 (080-201-001) Solari 

0950-1120(080-201-002) Holtzman 

PS 301 The President and Congress 3 

Prerequisite: PS 201 

0800-0930 (080-301-001) Holtzman 

PS 312 Introduction to Public Administration 3 

Credit for PS 312 and PS 511 is not allowed. 

0800-0930 (080-312-001) Coe 

PS 490 Readings and Research in Political Science 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (080-490-001) Staff 

PS 492 Honors Readings and Thesis in Political Science 3-6 

Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (080-492-001) Staff 

PS 498 Special Topics in Political Science: Political Economy 3 

Prerequisite: Six hours PS 

0950-1120(080-498-001) Solari 

PS 590 Readings and Research 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 

Hours arranged (080-590-001) Staff 

PS 699 Research in Politics Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of adviser 

Hours arranged (080-699-001) Staff 

TEN-WEEK SESSION 

PS 202E State and Local Government 3 

1730-1930 MTh (080-202-051) McClain 

PS 491 Internship in Political Science 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (080-491-051) McClain 

Product Design 
FIRST SESSION 

PD 494 Internship in Product Design 3-6 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in Product Design; 3.0 GPA or better; and approval of 

department head 
Maximum 6 credit hours 
Hours arranged (082-494-001) Khachatoorian 

PD 495 Independent Study in Product Design 1-3 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in Product Design; 3.0 GPA or better; and approval of 

department head 
Maximum 6 credit hours 
Hours arranged (082-495-001) Khachatoorian 

PD 595 Independent Study in Product Design 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (082-595-001) Khachatoorian 



93 



PD 691 Special Topics in Product Design 1-6 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (082-691-001) Khachatoorian 

SECOND SESSION 

PD 494 Internship in Product Design 3-6 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in Product Design; 3.0 GPA or better; and approval of 

department head 
Maximum 6 credit hours 

Hours arranged (082-494-001) Khachatoorian 

PD 495 Independent Study in Product Design 1-3 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in Product Design; 3.0 GPA or better; and approval of 

department head 
Maximum 6 credit hours 

Hours arranged (082-495-001) Khachatoorian 

PD 595 Independent Study in Product Design 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (082-595-001) Khachatoorian 

PD 691 Special Topics in Product Design 1-6 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (082-691-001) Khachatoorian 

Physical Education 
FIRST SESSION 

PE 100 (Coed) Health and Physical Fitness 1 

0830-0930 (075-100-001) Combs 

PE 112 Beginning Swimming 1 

0940-1040 (075-112-001) Almekinders 

1040-1140 (075-112-002) Almekinders 

PE 220 Water Aerobics 1 

Prerequisite: PE 112 

1300-1400 (075-220-001) Berle 

PE 221 Intermediate Swimming 1 

Prerequisite: PE 113 or equivalent skill 

0940-1040 (075-221-001) Goldberg 

PE 226 Skin and Scuba Diving I 2 

Prerequisite: PE 221 or equivalent skill 

1040-1240 (075-226-001) Goldberg 

1500-1700 MTuWTh (075-226-002) Stewart 

PE 231 Body Conditioning and Aerobics 1 

0940-1040(075-231-001) Berle 

1040-1140(075-231-002) Berle 

PE 232 Personal Defense for Women 1 

1300-1400 (075-232-001) Combs 

PE 237 Weight Training 1 

0940-1040 (075-237-001) Combs 

1200-1300 (075-237-002) Combs 

PE 237E Weight Training 1 

1745-1845 MTuWTh (075-237-003) Stewart 

94 



PE 241 Angling 1 

Additional Fee Assessed 

0830-0930 (075-241-001) Kascenska 

PE 242 Badminton 1 

1200-1300 (075-242-001) Daniels 

PE 243 Bowling 1 

$38.00 Bowling Fee 

1300-1400 (075-243-001) Leath 

1400-1500 (075-243-002) Leath 

PE 245 Golf 1 

0940-1040 (075-245-001) Patch 

1040-1140(075-245-002) Patch 

1300-1400 (075-245-003) Patch 

1400-1500 (075-245-004) Patch 

PE 249 Tennis I 1 

0830-0930 (075-249-001) Berle 

0940-1040 (075-249-002) Wall 

1040-1140(075-249-003) Wall 

1300-1400 (075-249-004) Almekinders 

1400-1500 (075-249-005) Almekinders 

PE 250 Tennis II 1 

1040-1140(075-250-001) Leath 

PE 251 Target Archery 1 

1040-1140 (075-251-001) Shannon 

PE 256 Racquetball 1 

0940-1040 (075-256-001) Leath 

PE 256E Racquetball 1 

1945-2045 MTuWTh (075-256-002) Stewart 

PE 258 Basic Rockclimbing 1 

1040-1140(075-258-001) Kascenska 

1300-1400 (075-258-002) Kascenska 

1400-1500 (075-258-003) Kascenska 

PE 265 Softball 1 

1040-1140 (075-265-001) J. B. Brown 

1300-1400 (075-265-002) Daniels 

PE 269 Volleyball 1 

1300-1400 (075-269-001) Wall 

1400-1500 (075-269-002) Wall 

PE 280 Emergency Medical Care and First Aid 2 

This Course Does Not Constitute Credit Toward Meeting Physical Education Require- 
ments. 

0940-1040 (075-280-001) Daniels 

SECOND SESSION 

PE 100 (Coed) Health and Physical Fitness 1 

0830-0930 (075-100-001) L. Brown 

PE 112 Beginning Swimming 1 

0940-1040(075-112-001) R. Smith 



95 



PE 226 Skin and Scuba Diving I 

Prerequisite: PE 221 or equivalent skill 
1200-1400 (075-226-001) 

PE 229 Swim Conditioning 

Prerequisite: PE 221 
0940-1040 (075-229-001) 

PE 237 Weight Training 

1200-1300 (075-237-001) 
1300-1400 (075-237-002) 
1615-1715 MTuWTh (075-237-003) 

PE 242 Badminton 

1040-1140(075-242-001) 
1200-1300 (075-242-002) 

PE 243 Bowling 

$38.00 Bowling Fee 
1300-1400 (075-243-001) 
1400-1500 (075-243-002) 

PE 245 Golf 

0940-1040 (075-245-001) 
1040-1140(075-245-002) 
1200-1300 (075-245-003) 
1300-1400 (075-245-004) 
1400-1500 (075-245-005) 

PE 249 Tennis I 

0940-1040 (075-249-001) 
1040-1140(075-249-002) 

PE 249E Tennis I 

1745-1845 MTuWTh (075-249-003) 

PE 251 Target Archery 

0830-0930 (075-251-001) 
1040-1140(075-251-002) 

PE 256 Raquetball 

0940-1040 (075-256-001) 
1040-1140(075-256-002) 
1500-1600 MTuWTh (075-256-003) 

PE 256E Racquetball 

1945-2045 MTuWTh (075-256-004) 

PE 265 Softball 

1300-1400 (075-265-001) 
1400-1500 (075-265-002) 

PE 269 Volleyball 

0940-1040 (075-269-001) 



L. Brown 
1 

L. Brown 

1 

R. Smith 

R. Smith 

DeWitt 

1 

Gwyn 

Halstead 

1 

Cooper 
Cooper 

1 

Cooper 

Cooper 

Brothers 

Gwyn 

Gwyn 



FIRST SESSION 

PHI 201 Logic 

0800-0930 (074-201-001) 
0950-1120(074-201-002) 



Philosophy 



96 



PHI 205 Problems and Types of Philosophy 3 

0800-0930 (074-205-001) VanDeVeer 

0950-1120(074-205-002) VanDeVeer 

PHI 314 Issues in Business Ethics 3 

0800-0930 (074-314-001) Pierce 

0950-1120(074-314-002) Pierce 

PHI 340 Philosophy of Science 3 

0800-0930 (074-340-001) Antony 

0950-1120(074-340-002) Antony 

SECOND SESSION 

PHI 201 Logic 3 

0800-0930 (074-201-001) Levine 

0950-1120 (074-201-002) Levine 

PHI 205 Problems and Types of Philosophy 3 

0800-0930 (074-205-001) Hambourger 

0950-1120 (074-205-002) Hambourger 

PHI 340 Philosophy of Science 3 

0800-0930 (074-340-001) Austin 

0950-1120(074-340-002) Austin 

Physiology 

FIRST SESSION 

PHY 590 Special Problems in Physiology Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (078-590-001) Britt 

PHY 699 Physiological Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (078-699-001) Britt 

SECOND SESSION 

PHY 699 Physiological Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (078-699-001) Britt 

Pest Management 
FIRST SESSION 

PM 495 Special Topics in Integrated Pest Management 1-6 

Prerequisite: PM 111. A total of only 6 hours of either PM 495 and/or ALS 400 can be 

applied towards B.S. requirements. 

Hours arranged (076-495-001) Staff 

PM 590 Advanced Topics in Integrated Pest Management 1-6 

Prerequisite: PM 405 or PM 415 

Hours arranged (076-590-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

PM 495 Special Topics in Integrated Pest Management 1-6 

Prerequisite: PM 111. A total of only 6 hours of either PM 495 and/or ALS 400 can be 

applied towards B.S. requirements. 

Hours arranged (076-495-001) Staff 

97 



PM 590 Advanced Topics in Integrated Pest Management 1-6 

Prerequisite: PM 405 or PM 415 

Hours arranged (076-590-001) Staff 

Poultry Science 
FIRST SESSION 

PO 495 Special Problems in Poultry Science 1-6 

Prerequisites: Junior standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (081-495-001) Ort 

PO 698 Special Problems in Poultry Science 1-6 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (081-698-001) Ort 

PO 699 Poultry Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (081-699-001) Ort 

SECOND SESSION 

PO 495 Special Problems in Poultry Science 1-6 

Prerequisites: Junior standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (081-495-001) Ort 

PO 698 Special Problems in Poultry Science 1-6 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (081-698-001) Ort 

PO 699 Poultry Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (081-699-001) Ort 

Plant Pathology 

FIRST SESSION 

PP 595 Special Problems in Plant Pathology Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor Maximum 6 

Hours arranged (079-595-001) Klarman 

PP 699 Research in Plant Pathology Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (079-699-001) Klarman 

SECOND SESSION 

PP 595 Special Problems in Plant Pathology Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor Maximum 6 

Hours arranged (079-595-001) Klarman 

PP 699 Research in Plant Pathology Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (079-699-001) Klarman 

TEN-WEEK SESSION 

$ PP 503 Plant Disease Diagnoses 4 

Prerequisites: PP 501 and PP 502A.B.C or equivalent 

0800-1700 MF (079-503-051) Grand/Jones 



98 



ADULT EDUCATION SESSION 

*PP 595A Special Problems in Plant Pathology: Plant 4 
Diseases— Principles, Diagnoses and Management 

Prerequisite: B.S. in a Plant Science 

0900-1600 Averre 

June 6-June 24— Three-Week Course— Final Exam June 24 

""Course taught in the three-week Regional Summer School for Adult, Extension and 
Community College Educators (June 6-24). Special registration procedures are 
required. See page 28 for additional information. 

Psychology 
FIRST SESSION 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 

0800-0930 (083-200-001) Staff 

0800-0930 (083-200-002) Pond 

0950-1120 (083-200-003) Pond 
0950-1120 (083-200-004) Cunningham 
1140-1310 (083-200-005) Cunningham 

PSY 210 Applied Psychology 3 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

0950-1120 (083-210-001) Smith 

PSY 300 Perception 3 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

0950-1120 (083-300-001) Krauss 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

0800-0930 (083-304-001) Street 

0950-1120(083-304-002) Staff 

PSY 307 Industrial and Organizational Psychology 3 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

0800-0930 (083-307-001) Reardin 

PSY 376 Human Growth and Development 3 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 304 

0950-1120 (083-376-001) Baker-Ward 

1140-1310 (083-376-002) Baker-Ward 

PSY 475 Child Psychology 3 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 304 

0950-1120 (083-475-001) Walker 

1140-1310(083-475-002) Walker 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Development 3 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 304 

0800-0930 (083-476-001) Staff 

PSY 499 Individual Study in Psychology 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (083-499-001) Staff 

PSY 533 Biological Factors in Abnormal Behavior 3 

Prerequisites: 6 hours of PSY and 6 hours of biology 

0800-1000 (083-533-001) Kalat 



99 



PSY 599 Research Problems in Psychology Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (083-599-00 1 ) Staff 

PSY 693 Psychological Clinic Practicum Maximum 12 
Prerequisites: Twelve hours in graduate psychology, which must include clinical skill 

courses PSY 571 and PSY 572 and/or Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (083-693-001) Staff 

PSY 699 Thesis and Dissertation Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (083-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 

0800-0930 (083-200-001) Flannagan 

0800-0930 (083-200-002) Cheuvront 

0950-1120(083-200-003) Staff 

1140-1310(083-200-004) Habler 

1330-1500 (083-200-005) Staff 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

0800-0930 (083-304-001) Janowitz 

0950- 1 120 (083-304-002) Staff 

PSY 307 Industrial and Organizational Psychology 3 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

0800-0930 (083-307-001) Reardin 

PSY 376 Human Growth and Development 3 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 304 

0800-0930 (083-376-001) Staff 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Development 3 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 304 

0800-0930 (083-476-001) Donley 

PSY 499 Individual Study in Psychology 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (083-499-001) Staff 

PSY 535 Tests and Measurements 3 

Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology 

0800-0930 (083-535-001) Westbrook 

0950-1120(083-535-002) Westbrook 

PSY 577 Adolescent Development 3 

Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology or Consent of Instructor 

0800-0930 (083-577-001) Snyder 

0950-1120(083-577-002) Snyder 

PSY 599 Research Problems in Psychology Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (083-599-001) Staff 

PSY 693 Psychological Clinic Practicum Maximum 12 
Prerequisites: Twelve hours in graduate psychology, which must include clinical skill 

courses PSY 571 and PSY 672 and/or Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (083-693-001) Staff 

PSY 699 Thesis and Dissertation Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (083-699-001) Staff 

100 



Physics 
FIRST SESSION 

$ PY 205 General Physics 4 

Prerequisite: MA 141. Required in most Engineering curricula. 

LR 0800-0930 (077-205-001) Staff 

LR 0950-1120 (077-205-002) Staff 

LB 0730-0940 MW (077-205-101) 

LB 1250-1500 MW (077-205-102) 

LB 1020-1230 MW (077-205-103) 

LB 1250-1500 MW (077-205-105) 

LB 1250-1500 TuTh (077-205-106) 

LB 1520-1730 MW (077-205-107) 

$ PY 208 General Physics 4 

Prerequisite: PY 205 

LR 0800-0930 (077-208-001) Staff 

LR 0950-1120 (077-208-002) Staff 

LB 0730-0940 MW (077-208-101) 

LB 1020-1230 MW (077-208-103) 

LB 1020-1230 TuTh (077-208-104) 

LB 1250-1500 MW (077-208-105) 

LB 1250-1500 TuTh (077-208-106) 

LB 1520-1730 MW (077-208-107) 

$ PY 2 1 1 General Physics 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or MA 116. Credit is not allowed for PY 211 and either PY 201 or 

PY 205. 
LR 0800-0930 (077-211-001) Staff 

LB 1250-1500 MW (077-211-101) 
LB 1250-1500 TuTh (077-211-102) 

$ PY 212 General Physics 4 

Prerequisite: PY 211. Credit is not allowed for PY 212 and either PY 202 or PY 208. 
LR 0950-1120 (077-212-001) Staff 

LB 1250-1500 MW (077-212-101) 
LB 1250-1500 TuTh (077-212-102) 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

Prerequisite: MA 115 

1020-1300 (077-221-001) Staff 

$ PY 231 Physics for Non-Scientists 4 

For Humanities and Social Sciences students only 

LR 0950-1120 (077-231-001) Staff 

LB 1250-1500 MW (077-231-101) 

PY 499 Special Problems in Physics 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (077-499-001) Staff 

PY 590 Special Topics in Physics Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (077-590-001) Staff 

PY 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (077-699-001) Staff 



101 



SECOND SESSION 

$ PY 205 General Physics 4 

Prerequisite: MA 141. Required in most Engineering curricula. 

LR 0800-0930 (077-205-001) Staff 

LR 0950-1 120 (077-205-002) Staff 

LB 0730-0940 MW (077-205-101) 

LB 1020-1230 MW (077-205-103) 

LB 1250-1500 MW (077-205-105) 

LB 1250-1500 TuTh (077-205-106) 

LB 1520-1730 MW (077-205-107) 

$ PY 208 General Physics 4 

Prerequisite: PY 205 

LR 0800-0930 (077-208-001) Staff 

LR 0950-1 120 (077-208-002) Staff 

LB 0730-0940 MW (077-208-101) 

LB 1020-1230 MW (077-208-103) 

LB 1250-1500 MW (077-208-105) 

LB 1250-1500 TuTh (077-208-106) 

LB 1520-1730 MW (077-208-107) 

$ P Y 2 1 1 General Physics 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or MA 116. Credit is not allowed for PY 211 and either PY 201 or 

PY 205. 
LR 0950-1120 (077-211-001) Staff 

LB 1250-1500 MW (077-211-101) 
LB 1250-1500 TuTh (077-211-102) 

$ PY 212 General Physics 4 

Prerequisite: PY 211. Credit is not allowed for PY 212 and either PY 202 or PY 208. 
LR 0800-0930 (077-212-001) Staff 

LB 1250-1500 MW (077-212-101) 
LB 1250-1500 TuTh (077-212-102) 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

Prerequisite: MA 115 

1020-1300 (077-221-001) Staff 

PY 407 Introduction to Modern Physics 3 

Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 208 

0800-0930 (077-407-001) Staff 

PY 499 Special Problems in Physics 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (077-499-001) Staff 

PY 590 Special Topics in Physics Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (077-590-001) Staff 

PY 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (077-699-001) Staff 

Religion 
FIRST SESSION 

REL 300 Religious Traditions of the World 3 

0800-0930 (087-300-001) VanderKam 

0950- 1 120 (087-300-002) VanderKam 



102 



SECOND SESSION 

REL 300 Religious Traditions of the World 3 

0800-0930 (087-300-001) Mullin 

0950-1120(087-300-002) Mullin 

Recreation Resources Administration 
FIRST SESSION 

RRA 152 Introduction to Recreation 3 

0800-0930 (085-152-001) Sternloff 

0950-1120(085-152-002) Sternloff 

RRA 475 Recreation and Park Internship 9 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, RRA 359 

Hours arranged (085-475-001) Kirsch 

RRA 591 Recreation Resources Problems 1-4 

Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate or Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (085-591-001) Staff 

RRA 675 Field Studies in Recreation 1-4 

Prerequisite: Minimum of nine hours graduate credit 

Hours arranged (085-675-001) Staff 

RRA 692 Advanced Problems in Recreation Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours RRA courses 

Hours arranged (085-692-001) Staff 

RRA 699 Research in Recreation Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours RRA courses 

Hours arranged (085-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

RRA 152 Introduction to Recreation 3 

0800-0930 (085-152-001) Love 

RRA 591 Recreation Resources Problems 1-4 

Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate or Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (085-591-001) Staff 

RRA 595 Special Topics in Recreation Resources: Aging & Leisure 3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing: Consent of Instructor 

0950-1120(085-595-001) Love 

RRA 675 Field Studies in Recreation 1-4 

Prerequisite: Minimum of nine hours graduate credit 

Hours arranged (085-675-001) Staff 

RRA 692 Advanced Problems in Recreation Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours RRA courses 

Hours arranged (085-692-001) Staff 

RRA 699 Research in Recreation Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours RRA courses 

Hours arranged (085-699-001) Staff 



103 



Sociology 
FIRST SESSION 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

0800-0930 (092-202-001) Thomson 

0800-0930 (092-202-002) Staff 

0950- 1 120 (092-202-003) Devey 

1140-1310(092-202-004) Devey 

1140-1310(092-202-005) Delia Fave 

SOC 202E Principles of Sociology 3 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (092-202-006) Staff 

SOC 203 Current Social Problems 3 

0950-1120(092-203-001) Staff 

SOC 204 Sociology of Family 3 

0800-0930 (092-204-001) Troost 

0950-1120(092-204-002) Troost 

0950-1120(092-204-003) Risman 

1140-1310(092-204-004) Risman 

SOC 204E Sociology of Family 3 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (092-204-005) Uzzell 

1945-2130 MTuWTh (092-204-006) Uzzell 

SOC 205 Work: Occupations and Professions 3 

1140-1310 (092-205-001) Staff 

SOC 301 Human Behavior 3 

Prerequisite: SOC 202 or PSY 200 

0800-0930 (092-301-001) Hyman 

0950-1120(092-301-002) Hyman 

SOC 301E Human Behavior 3 

Prerequisite: SOC 202 or PSY 200 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (092-301-003) Staff 

SOC 305 Race and Ethnic Relations 3 

Prerequisite: Three credits of SOC 

0950-1120 (092-305-001) Delia Fave 

SOC 306 Criminology 3 

Prerequisite: Three credits of SOC 

0800-0930 (092-306-001) Zingraff 

$ SOC 416 Social Research Methods 3 

Prerequisite: Senior standing, ST 311 or Consent of Instructor 

0950-1120(092-416-001) Thomson 

SOC 420 Sociology of Corrections 3 

Prerequisites: SOC 306 and PS 311 

1140-1310(092-420-001) Zingraff 

SOC 498 Special Topics in Sociology 1-6 

Prerequisite: Six hours of SOC above 200 level 

Hours arranged (092-498-001) Staff 

SOC 591 Special Topics in Sociology 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (092-591-001) Staff 



104 



SOC 595 Practicum in Sociology 3-6 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the Master of Sociology program and 9 hours of SOC 

at the 500-600 level. 

Hours arranged (092-595-001) Staff 

SOC 699 Research in Sociology Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of chairman of graduate student committee 

Hours arranged (092-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

0800-0930 (092-202-001) (092-202-002) Staff 

0950-1120(092-202-003) Marsh 

0950-1120(092-202-004) Staff 

1140-1310(092-202-005) Staff 

SOC 202E Principles of Sociology 3 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (092-202-006) Staff 

SOC 203 Current Social Problems 3 

0950-1120(092-203-001) Staff 

SOC 203E Current Social Problems 3 

1945-2130 MTuWTh (092-203-002) Brown 

SOC 204 Sociology of Family 3 

0800-0930 (092-204-001) Staff 

0950-1120 (092-204-002) (092-204-003) Staff 

1140-1310 (092-204-004) Staff 

SOC 204E Sociology of Family 3 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (092-204-005) Staff 

1945-2130 MTuWTh (092-204-006) Staff 

SOC 301 Human Behavior 3 

Prerequisite: SOC 202 or PSY 200 

0800-0930 (092-301-001) Brisson 

0950-1120(092-301-002) Brisson 

SOC 305 Race and Ethnic Relations 3 

Prerequisite: Three credits of SOC 

1140-1310(092-305-001) Woodrum 

SOC 400 Theories of Social Structure 3 

Prerequisite: Three hours credit 200 level 

0800-0930 (092-400-001) Woodrum 

SOC 425 Juvenile Delinquency 3 

Prerequisite: SOC 202; SOC 301 desirable 

0950-1120(092-425-001) Hill 

SOC 498 Special Topics in Sociology 1-6 

Prerequisite: Six hours of SOC above the 200 level 

Hours arranged (092-498-001) Suval 

SOC 515 Deviant Behavior 3 

Prerequisite: Six hours SOC or ANT, or Graduate standing or PBS status 

1140-1310(092-515-001) Hill 

SOC 541 Social Systems and Planned Change 3 

Prerequisite: Three hours of Sociology 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (092-541-001) Marsh 



105 



SOC 591 Special Topics in Sociology 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (092-591-001) 



1-6 
Suval 



SOC 595 Practicum in Sociology 3-6 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the Master of Sociology program and 9 hours of 

SOC at 500-600 level. 
Hours arranged (092-595-001) Suval 



SOC 699 Research in Sociology 

Prerequisite: Consent of chairman of graduate study committee 
Hours arranged (092-699-001) 



Credits Arranged 
Suval 



Speech-Communication 



FIRST SESSION 



SP 101 Speech Improvement 

Not accepted for area emphasis requirement in Public Communication 
0950-1120(037-101-001) 

SP 103 Introduction to the Theatre 

0950-1120(037-103-001) 

SP 110 Public Speaking 

0800-0930(037-110-001) 
0800-0930(037-110-002) 
0950-1120(037-110-003) 
0950-1120(037-110-004) 
1140-1310(037-110-005) 

SP 112 Interpersonal Communication 

0800-0930(037-112-001) 
0800-0930(037-112-002) 
0950-1120(037-112-003) 
0950-1120(037-112-004) 
1140-1310(037-112-005) 

SP 146 Business and Professional Communication 

Speech-Communication majors may not count SP 146 in the major 
0800-0930 (037-146-001) 

SP 203 Theory and Practice of Acting 

0800-0930 (037-203-001) 

SP 204 Writing for the Electronic Media 

0800-0930 (037-204-001) 

SP 214 Introduction to Audio Production 

Preference is given to Speech-Communication majors. 
1140-1310(037-214-001) 

SP 298 Special Projects in Speech-Communication 

0950-1120(037-298-001) 

SP 298A Special Projects in Speech-Communication: 
Intercultural Communication 

0950-1120(037-298-002) 

SP 312 Patterns of Miscommunication 

0950-1120(037-312-001) 



Franklin 

3 
Caple 



Franklin 
Schrag 
Schrag 
Parker 
Parker 

3 
DeJoy 

Staff 

DeJoy 

Staff 

Anderson 



Hankins 

3 
Caple 

3 
Staff 



Alchediak 

1-3 
Staff 



Hankins 

3 

Munn 



106 



SP 322 Nonverbal Communication 3 

Prerequisite: SP 112 

0950-1120(037-322-001) Anderson 

SP 342 Interviewing 3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

0800-0930 (037-342-001) Munn 

SP 354 Portable Video Production 3 

Preference given to Speech-Communication majors. 

0950-1120(037-354-001) Alchediak 

SP 498 Special Topics in Speech-Communication 1-3 

Prerequisites: Nine hours of speech and Junior standing and permission of the department. 

Hours arranged (037-498-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

SP 103 Introduction to the Theatre 3 

0800-0930 (037-103-001) Russell 

SP 110 Public Speaking 3 

0800-0930 (037-110-001) Long 

0950-1120(037-110-002) Long 

0950-1 120 (037-1 10-003) Camp 

1140-1310(037-110-004) Camp 

SP 112 Interpersonal Communication 3 

0800-0930(037-112-001) Staff 

0950-1120 (037-112-002) (037-112-003) Staff 

1140-1310(037-112-004) Staff 

SP 146 Business and Professional Communication 3 

Speech-Communication majors may not count SP 146 in the major 

0800-0930 (037-146-001) Staff 

SP 200 Introduction to Communication Inquiry 3 

Prerequisite: SP 100 

0950-1120 (037-200-001) Funkhouser 

SP 203 Theory and Practice of Acting 3 

0950-1120 (037-203-001) Russell 

SP 214 Introduction to Audio Production 3 

Preference is given to Speech-Communication majors. 

1140-1310(037-214-001) Staff 

SP 304 Survey of Telecommunication 3 

1140-1310 (037-304-001) Funkhouser 

SP 322 Nonverbal Communication 3 

Prerequisite: SP 112 

1140-1310 (037-322-001) Staff 

SP 498 Special Topics in Speech-Communication 1-3 

Prerequisites: Nine hours of speech and Junior standing and permission of the department. 

Hours arranged (037-498-001) Staff 



107 



Soil Science 

FIRST SESSION 

SSC 590 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: SSC 200 

Hours arranged (093-590-00 1 ) Staff 

SSC 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in SSC 

Hours arranged (093-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

SSC 590 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: SSC 200 

Hours arranged (093-590-001) Staff 

SSC 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in SSC 

Hours arranged (093-699-001) Staff 

ADULT EDUCATION SESSION 

*SSC 560 Advanced Soil Management 3 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, SSC 341 

0900-1600 Cook/Denton 

June 6 - June 24— Three- Week Course— Final Exam June 24 

*Course taught in the three-week Regional Summer School for Adult, Extension and 
Community College Educators (June 6-24). Special registration procedures are 
required. See page 28 for additional information. 

Statistics 
FIRST SESSION 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

0950-1120(094-311-001) Latour 

ST (EB) 350 Economics and Business Statistics 3 

(See Economics and Business) 

ST 361 Introduction to Statistics for Engineers 3 

Prerequisite: College Algebra 

0800-0930 (094-361-001) Kianifard 

ST 371 Introduction to Probability and Distribution Theory 3 

Prerequisite: MA 201 

Corequisite: MA 202 

0950-1120(094-371-001) Wesler 

0800-0930 (094-371-002) Wesler 

ST 493 Special Topics in Statistics 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (094-493-001) Staff 

ST 51 IS Experimental Statistics I 3 

Prerequisite: ST 311 or Graduate standing 

1140-1310(094-511-001) Pollock 



108 



ST 515 Experimental Statistics for Engineers 

Prerequisite: ST 361 or Graduate standing 
0950-1120(094-515-001) 

ST 591 Special Problems 

Hours arranged (094-591-001) 

ST 691 Advanced Special Problems 

Prerequisites: ST 402 or equivalent, ST 681 
Hours arranged (094-691-001) 

ST 699 Research 

Hours arranged (094-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

ST(EB) 350 Economics and Business Statistics 

(See Economics and Business) 

ST 372 Introduction to Statistical Inference and Regression 

Prerequisite: ST 371 
0950-1120(094-372-001) 

ST 512S Experimental Statistics II 

Prerequisite: ST 511 or equivalent 
0800-0930 (094-512-001) 

$ ST 516 Experimental Statistics for Engineers 

Prerequisite: ST 515 
0950-1120(094-516-001) 

ST 591 Special Problems 

Hours arranged (094-591-001) 

ST 691 Advanced Special Problems 

Prerequisites: ST 402 or equivalent, ST 681 
Hours arranged (094-691-001) 

ST 699 Research 

Hours arranged (094-699-001) 



Quesenberry 

1-3 
Staff 

1-3 

Staff 

Credits Arranged 
Staff 



3 

Dietz 
3 

Giesbrecht 
3 

Hader 

1-3 

Staff 

1-3 

Staff 

Credits Arranged 
Staff 



TEN-WEEK SESSION 

ST 595 Statistical Consulting 

Prerequisites: ST 512 and ST 522 
Hours arranged (094-595-051) 



Berger/ Proctor 



Social Work 



FIRST SESSION 



SW 498 Special Topics in Social Work 1-6 

Prerequisite: Nine hours of Social Work. Bachelor of social work students. 

Hours arranged (086-498-001) Peebles 

SECOND SESSION 

SW 312 Social Work Practice in Health Care 3 

Prerequisite: For Social Work students only 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (086-312-001) Brown 

SW 498 Special Topics in Social Work 1-6 

Prerequisite: Nine hours of Social Work. Bachelor of social work students. 

Hours arranged (086-498-001) Peebles 



109 



Textile Chemistry 
FIRST SESSION 

T 203 Introduction to Polymer Chemistry 3 

Prerequisite: CH 101 

0800-0930 (095-203-001) Staff 

TC 490 Special Topics in Textile Chemistry 1-6 

Hours arranged (096-490-001) Mock 

TC 591 Special Topics in Textile Science 1-4 

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (096-591-001) Mock 

TC 699 Textile Research for Textile Chemistry Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (096-699-001) Mock 

SECOND SESSION 

$ T 301 Technology of Dyeing and Finishing 4 

Prerequisite: T 203 

LR 0800-0930 (095-301-001) Staff 

LB 1340-1620 MW (095-301-101) 

T 493 Industrial Internship in Textiles 3 

Prerequisites: Textile core courses. Limited to 3 hours as free elective. 

Hours arranged (095-493-001) Massey 

TC 490 Special Topics in Textile Chemistry 1-6 

Hours arranged (096-490-001) Mock 

TC 591 Special Topics in Textile Science 1-4 

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (096-591-001) Mock 

TC 699 Textile Research for Textile Chemistry Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (096-699-001) Mock 

Textile Engineering and Science 
FIRST SESSION 

$ T 220 Yarn Production Systems 3 

Prerequisites: T 105, MA 111 

LR 0950-1050 (095-220-001) Banks-Lee 

LB 1340-1620 TuTh (095-220-101) 

TES 490 Development Projects in Textile Engineering 2-3 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and 2.75 GPA. Course may be taken twice provided projects 

are different. 
Hours arranged (097-490-001) Gupta 

TES 590 Special Projects in Textiles Engineering and Science 2-3 

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (097-590-001) Gupta 

TES 697 Independent Study in Textiles 3 

Hours arranged (097-697-001) Gupta 

TES 699 Textile Thesis or Dissertation Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (097-699-001) Gupta 



110 



SECOND SESSION 

T 493 Industrial Internship in Textiles 3 

Prerequisites: Textile core courses. Limited to 3 hours as free elective. 

Hours arranged (095-493-001) Massey 

TES 490 Development Projects in Textile Engineering 2-3 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and 2.75 GPA. Course may be taken twice provided projects 

are different. 
Hours arranged (097-490-001) Gupta 

TES 590 Special Projects in Textiles Engineering and Science 

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (097-590-001) 

TES 697 Independent Study in Textiles 

Hours arranged (097-697-001) 

TES 699 Textile Thesis or Dissertation Research 

Hours arranged (097-699-001) 



2-3 

Gupta 

3 
Gupta 

Credits Arranged 
Gupta 



Textile Management and Technology 
FIRST SESSION 

TMT 490 Development Project in Textile Technology 2-3 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and 2.75 GPA. Course may be taken twice provided projects 

are different subject matter. 
Hours arranged (102-490-001) 



Robinson 
2-3 

Tucker 

3 
Tucker 

Credits Arranged 
Tucker 



Donaldson 



TMT 590 Special Projects in Textile Management and Technology 

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 
Hours arranged (102-590-001) 

TMT 697 Independent Study in Textiles 

Hours arranged (102-697-001) 

TMT 699 Textile Thesis or Dissertation Research 

Hours arranged (102-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

$ T 250 Textile Fabrics: Formation and Structure 

Prerequisites: T 105 and MA 111 

LR 0950-1050 (095-250-001) 

LB 1340-1620 TuTh (095-250-101) 

T 493 Industrial Internship in Textiles 3 

Prerequisites: Textile core courses. Limited to 3 hours as free elective. 

Hours arranged (095-493-001) Massey 

TMT 490 Development Project in Textile Technology 2-3 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and 2.75 GPA. Course may be taken twice provided projects 

are different subject matter. 
Hours arranged (102-490-001) Robinson 

TMT 590 Special Projects in Textile Management and Technology 2-3 

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (102-590-001) Berkstresser 

TMT 697 Independent Study in Textiles 3 

Hours arranged (102-697-001) Berkstresser 



111 



TMT 699 Textile Thesis or Dissertation Research 

Hours arranged (102-699-001) 



Toxicology 



FIRST SESSION 



TOX 590 Special Problems in Toxicology 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (088-590-001) 

TOX 699 Research 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (088-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

TOX 590 Special Problems in Toxicology 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (088-590-001) 

TOX 699 Research 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (088-699-001) 



Credits Arranged 
Berkstresser 



1-3 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 

1-3 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 



University Studies 



FIRST SESSION 



UNI 301 Science and Civilization 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 
0800-0930 (089-301-001) 

UNI 302 Contemporary Science and Human Values 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 
0950-1120(089-302-001) 

UNI 495Z Special Topics in University Studies: AIDS 

1200-1315 (089-495-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

UNI 301 Science and Civilization 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 
0950-1120(089-301-001) 

UNI 302 Contemporary Science and Human Values 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 
1140-1310(089-302-001) 



Visual Design 



FIRST SESSION 



$ VD 400 Visual Design Studio 

Prerequisite: DF 102 or written approval of department head and Dean 
Corequisites: DN 456, DN 242 
0750-1300 (042-400-001) 



Stalnaker 
3 

Stalnaker 

1 
Turnbull 



Hoffman 
3 

Hoffman 



6 
Deere 



112 






VD 494 Internship in Visual Design 3-6 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in Visual Design; 3.0 GPA or better; and written approval 

of department head 
Maximum 6 credit hours 
Hours arranged (042-494-001) Khachatoorian 

VD 495 Independent Study in Visual Design 1-3 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in Visual Design; 3.0 GPA or better; and approval of 

department head 
Maximum 6 credit hours 
Hours arranged (042-495-001) Khachatoorian 

VD 595 Independent Study in Visual Design 1-3 

Hours arranged (042-595-001) Khachatoorian 

VD 691 Special Topics in Visual Design 1-6 

Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate advisor 

Hours arranged (042-691-001) Khachatoorian 

SECOND SESSION 

VD 494 Internship in Visual Design 3-6 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in Visual Design; 3.0 GPA or better; and written approval 

of department head 
Maximum 6 credit hours 
Hours arranged (042-494-001) Khachatoorian 

VD 495 Independent Study in Visual Design 1-3 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in Visual Design; 3.0 GPA or better; and approval of 

department head 
Maximum 6 credit hours 
Hours arranged (042-495-001) Khachatoorian 

VD 595 Independent Study in Visual Design 1-3 

Hours arranged (042-595-001) Khachatoorian 

VD 691 Special Topics in Visual Design 1-6 

Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate advisor 

Hours arranged (042-691-001) Khachatoorian 

Veterinary Medical Sciences 
FIRST SESSION 

VMS 590 Special Topics in Veterinary Medical Sciences 1-3 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (084-590-001) Bentley/Berkhoff/Brown/Henrikson 

VMS 690B Special Topics in Pathology 1-4 

Prerequisites: DVM degree and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (084-690-001) Brown/Staff 

VMS 690C Special Topics in Laboratory Pharmacology 1-3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (084-690-002) Bentley/Staff 

VMS 694A Seminar in Necropsy Pathology 1 

Prerequisites: DVM or equivalent degree and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (084-694-001) Brown/Staff 

VMS 694B Seminar in Surgical Pathology 1 

Prerequisites: DVM or equivalent degree and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (084-694-002) Brown/Staff 

113 



VMS 699 Research in Veterinary Medical Sciences 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (084-699-001) Bentley/Berkhoff/Brown/Henrikson 

SECOND SESSION 

VMS 590 Special Topics in Veterinary Medical Sciences 1-3 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (084-590-001) Bentley/Berkhoff/Brown/Henrikson 

VMS 690B Special Topics in Pathology 1-4 

Prerequisites: DVM degree and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (084-690-001) Brown/Staff 

VMS 690C Special Topics in Laboratory Pharmacology 1-3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (084-690-002) Bentley/Staff 

VMS 694A Seminar in Necropsy Pathology 1 

Prerequisites: DVM or equivalent degree and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (084-694-001) Brown/Staff 

VMS 694B Seminar in Surgical Pathology 1 

Prerequisites: DVM or equivalent degree and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (084-694-002) Brown/Staff 

VMS 699 Research in Veterinary Sciences 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (084-699-001) Bentley/Berkhoff/Brown/Henrikson 

Wood and Paper Science 
FIRST SESSION 

$ WPS 205 Wood Products Practicum 5 

Prerequisite: WPS 201 or WPS 202 

0800-1700 (090-205-001) Gilmore/Kelly 

WPS 491 Senior Problems in Wood and Paper Science 1-4 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (090-491-001) Staff 

WPS 591 Wood and Paper Science Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (090-591-001) Staff 

WPS 693 Advanced Wood and Paper Science Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (090-693-001) Staff 

WPS 699 Problems and Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (090-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

WPS 491 Senior Problems in Wood and Paper Science 1-4 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (090-491-001) Staff 

WPS 591 Wood and Paper Science Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (090-591-001) Staff 



114 



WPS 693 Advanced Wood and Paper Science Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (090-693-001) Staff 

WPS 699 Problems and Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (090-699-001) Staff 



Zoology 



FIRST SESSION 



$ BS 100 General Biology 4 

(See Biological Sciences) 

$ ZO 201 General Zoology 4 

Prerequisite: BS 100 or BS 105 

LR 0800-0930 (099-201-001) Staff 

LB 1340-1750 MW (099-201-101) 

LB 1340-1750 TuTh (099-201-102) 

ZO 205 Introduction to Cellular and Developmental Zoology 4 

Prerequisite: BS 100 

1020-1230 (099-205-001) Staff 

ZO (FW) 221 Conservation of Natural Resources 3 

(See Fisheries and Wildlife) 

ZO (BO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 3 

Prerequisite: A 200 level Biology course 

0950-1120(099-360-001) Staff 

$ ZO (BO) 365 Ecology Laboratory 1 

Corequisite: ZO (BO) 360 

1340-1750 MW (099-365-101) Staff 

1340-1750 TuTh (099-365-102) 

ZO 590 Special Studies Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Twelve semester credits in Zoology and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (099-590-001) G. Miller 

ZO 699 Research in Zoology Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Twelve semester credits in Zoology and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (099-699-001) G. Miller 

SECOND SESSION 

$ ZO 305 Cell and Animal Physiology Laboratory 2 

Prerequisite: ZO 205 

1300-1700 TuTh (099-305-001) Staff 

ZO 421E Principles of Physiology 3 

Prerequisites: CH 223, PY 212, ZO 201 or ZO 303 

1910-2200 MTuWTh (099-421-001) Staff 

ZO 590 Special Studies Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Twelve semester credits in Zoology and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (099-590-001) G. Miller 

ZO 699 Research in Zoology Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Twelve semester credits in Zoology and Consent of Instructor 

Hours arranged (099-699-001) G. Miller 



115 



LATE AFTERNOON AND EVENING CLASSES 

FIRST SESSION 
ANTHROPOLOGY 

ANT 252E Cultural Anthropology 3 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (012-252-003) Staff 

EDUCATION 

ED 296B Special Topics in Education: Health Care Delivery Systems 3 

1700-2030 MTh (028-296-002) Patterson 

ED 496N Special Topics in Education: New Developments in 3 

Teaching English as a Second Language 

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and Consent of Instructor 

1745-1900 MTuWTh (028-496-002) Fennell 

ED 530E Theories and Techniques of Counseling 3 

Prerequisite: Six hours of ED or PSY 

Corequisite: ED 520 or equivalent 

1600-1930 TuTh (028-530-001) Saidla 

1600-1930 MW (028-530-002) Gerler 

ED 596A Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 3 

Education: Death and Dying — A Lifespan Issue 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 

1600-1930 MW (028-596-002) Glass 

ED 596B Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 3 

Education: Working in Groups in Adult Education 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 

1600-1930 TuTh (028-596-003) Glass 

ED 597G Special Problems in Education: Personal Publishing 3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status 

1600-1930 TuTh (028-597-002) Ballenger 

ED 639E Group Counseling 3 

Prerequisites: ED 530 and one of the following: ED 520, ED 534, ED 553, or ED 535 
1600-1930 TuTh (028-639-001) Gerler 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 
FRENCH 

$ FLF 101E Elementary French I 3 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (064-101-004) Staff 

SPANISH 

$ FLS 101 Elementary Spanish I 3 

1545-1730 MTuWTh (068-101-004) Alonso 

$ FLS 201 E Intermediate Spanish I 3 

Prerequisite: FLS 102 or FLS 105 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (068-201-003) Alonso 

FLS 304 Modern Latin American Literature 3 

Prerequisite: FLS 202 or equivalent 

1545-1730 MTuWTh (068-304-001) Kelly 

116 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

IA 590 Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts: Advanced Technology 3 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and Consent of Instructor 

1630-1800 (047-590-001) DeLuca 

POLITICAL SCIENCE AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

PA 611 Seminar in Public Personnel Management 3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or Management Development Certificate Program and 

six semester hours of 500-level course work 
1830-2100 MTuTh (034-611-001) Sims 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PE 237E Weight Training 1 

1745-1845 MTuWTh (075-237-003) Stewart 

PE 256E Racquetball 1 

1945-2045 MTuWTh (075-256-002) Stewart 

SOCIOLOGY 

SOC 202E Principles of Sociology 3 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (092-202-006) Staff 

SOC 204E Sociology of Family 3 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (092-204-005) Uzzell 

1945-2130 MTuWTh (092-204-006) Uzzell 

SOC 301E Human Behavior 3 

Prerequisite: SOC 202 or PSY 200 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (092-301-003) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 
ANTHROPOLOGY 

ANT 252E Cultural Anthropology 3 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (012-252-004) Staff 

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING 

ECE 436 Digital Control Systems 3 

Prerequisite: ECE 435 

1730-1915 MTuWTh (030-436-001) Staff 

EDUCATION 

ED 593A Special Problems in Occupational Education: 3 

Teaching Technical Content in Agricultural Education 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, PBS status, or Graduate standing in OED 

1600-1900 (028-593-001) Malpiedi 

July 5-July 25— Three-Week Course— Final Exam July 25 

ED 593D Special Problems in Occupational Education: Marketing 3 

Education and Training Programs 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, PBS status, or Graduate standing in OED 

1730-2130 WTh (028-593-004) Burrow 



117 



ED 693 Advanced Special Problems in Occupational Education: 3 
Clinical Evaluation of Students 

Prerequisite: Master's degree in Vocational field or Consent of Instructor 

1710-2030 MW (028-693-001) Davis 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

FRENCH 

$ FLF 102E Elementary French II 3 

Prerequisite: FLF 101 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (064-102-003) Ryan 

POLITICAL SCIENCE AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

*PA 516E Public Policy Analysis 3 

Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate standing including 12 hours of political science. 

Graduate standing or PBS status 

1900-2200 MW (034-516-001) Swiss 

PA 612 The Budgetary Process 3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or Management Development Certificate Program and 

six semester hours of 500-level course work 

1630-1830 MTuWTh (034-612-001) Coe 

*PA 614E Management Systems 3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or Management Development Certificate Program and 

six semester hours of 500-level course work 

1900-2200 TuTh (034-614-001) Swiss 

There will be additional class meetings on July 23 and August 10. The final exami- 
nation will be on August 12. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PE 237 Weight Training 1 

1615-1715 MTuWTh (075-237-003) DeWitt 

PE 249E Tennis I 1 

1745-1845 MTuWTh (075-249-003) DeWitt 

PE 256E Racquetball 1 

1945-2045 MTuWTh (075-256-004) DeWitt 

SOCIOLOGY 

SOC 202E Principles of Sociology 3 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (092-202-006) Staff 

SOC 203E Current Social Problems 3 

1945-2130 MTuWTh (092-203-002) Brown 

SOC 204E Sociology of Family 3 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (092-204-005) Staff 

1945-2130 MTuWTh (092-204-006) Staff 

SOC 541 Social Systems and Planned Change 3 

Prerequisite: Three hours of Sociology 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (092-541-001) Marsh 



118 



SOCIAL WORK 

SW 312 Social Work Practice in Health Care 3 

Prerequisite: For Social Work students only 

1745-1930 MTuWTh (086-312-001) Brown 

ZOOLOGY 

ZO 421E Principles of Physiology 3 

Prerequisites: CH 223, PY 212, ZO 201 or ZO 303 

1910-2200 MTuWTh (099-421-001) Staff 

TEN-WEEK SESSION 
ACCOUNTING 

ACC 210E Accounting I— Concepts of Financial Reporting 3 

1745-1930 TuTh (004-210-051) Brooks 

ACC 220E Accounting II— An Introduction to Managerial Accounting 3 

Prerequisite: ACC 210 

1945-2130 TuTh (004-220-051) Staff 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

$ CSC 101E Introduction to Programming 3 

Prerequisite: MA 111 with a grade of C or better 

LR 1745-1930 MW (023-101-051) Nelson 

LB 1945-2130 MW (023-101-151) (023-101-152) (023-101-153) 
(023-101-154) (023-101-155) (023-101-156) 

$ CSC 102E Programming Concepts 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 101 

1745-1930 MW (023-102-052) Brain 

CSC 200E Introduction to Computers and Their Uses 3 

A student who has previously taken CSC 101 or CSC 111 may not receive credit for this 

course. 

1615-1730 TuTh (023-200-052) Lindhome/Curtis 

NOTE: Students registering for CSC 200E must also register for CSC 200Y. 

$ CSC 200Y Introduction to Computers Laboratory 

1745-2045 Tu (023-200-161) 
1745-2045 W (023-200-162) 
1745-2045 Th (023-200-163) 

$ CSC 20 IE Basic Computer Organization and Assembly Language 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 102 

1945-2130 TuTh (023-201-052) Lasher 

$ CSC 202E Concepts and Facilities of Operating Systems 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 201 or equivalent 

1745-1930 TuTh (023-202-051) Miller 

$ C SC 3 1 1 E Data Structures 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 102 

1745-1930 TuTh (023-311-052) E. Hodges 

CSC 42 IE Introduction to Management Information Systems 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 311 

1745-1930 MW (023-421-051) Reid 



119 



$ CSC 431E File Organization and Processing 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 311 

1545-1730 TuTh (023-431-051) Ruchte 

$ CSC 461E Computer Graphics 3 

Prerequisites: MA 202 or MA 212; CSC 101 or CSC 111 

1745-1930 TuTh (023-461-052) L. Hodges 

COMPUTER STUDIES 

$ CSE 452E Assembly Language and Basic Computer Organization 1 

Prerequisites: Higher level programming language and Consent of Instructor 

No degree credit for Computer Science or Computer Studies majors or anyone having 

received credit for CSC 201 or CSC 256. 

1945-2130 TuTh (009-452-052) Lasher 

$ CSC 453E Data Structures 1 

Prerequisites: Higher level programming language and Consent of Instructor 

Corequisite: CSE 452 or equivalent 

No degree credit for Computer Science or Computer Studies majors or anyone having 

received credit for CSC 311. 

1745-1930 TuTh (009-453-052) E. Hodges 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 

EB 307E Business Law I 3 

Prerequisite: EB 201 or EB 212 

Credit for both EB 306 and EB 307 is not allowed. 

1745-1930 MW (027-307-051) Staff 

EB 603E History of Economic Thought 3 

Prerequisites: EB 501, EB 502 or equivalent 

1745-1930 MW (027-603-051) D. Fisher 

EB 625E Long Range Planning in Business and Industry 3 

Prerequisite: EB 501 

1745-1930 TuTh (027-625-051) Newmark 

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING 

ECE 540 Electromagnetic Fields 3 

Prerequisite: ECE 448 

1530-1645 MWF (030-540-051) Kauffman 

ENGLISH 
FRESHMAN ENGLISH 

ENG 11 IE Composition and Rhetoric 3 

General University requirement. 

Successful completion of ENG 111 requires a grade of C or better. 

1745-1930 MW (036-111-051) Staff 

ENG 112E Composition and Reading 3 

General University requirement. 

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENG 111 

1745-1930 MW (036-112-051) Staff 

1945-2130 MW (036-112-052) Staff 



120 



WRITING AND LANGUAGE 

The prerequisite for all courses in writing and language at the 200-level and above is the 
completion of ENG 111 and ENG 112. 

ENG 321E The Communication of Technical Information 3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

1745-1930 TuTh (036-321-051) Staff 

1945-2130 TuTh (036-321-052) Staff 

LITERATURE 

The prerequisite for all literature courses is the completion of ENG 111 and ENG 112. 

ENG 208E Studies in Fiction 3 

The courses ENG 205, ENG 206, ENG 207, and ENG 208 are designed for students not 

enrolled in Humanities and Social Sciences. 

1945-2130 MW (036-208-051) Staff 

ENG 26 IE English Literature I 3 

1745-1930 MW (036-261-051) Staff 

ENG 265E American Literature I 3 

1745-1930 TuTh (036-265-051) Staff 

ENG 266E American Literature II 3 

1945-2130 TuTh (036-266-051) Staff 

MATHEMATICS 

MA 11 IE Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

Credit is not allowed for both MA 100 and MA 111. For students in Engineering, Physical 
and Mathematical Sciences, Design, Biological and Agricultural Engineering (Science 
program). Biological Sciences (all options), and Mathematics Education, Science Educa- 
tion credit in MA 111 does not count toward graduation requirements. 
1915-2150 MW (054-111-051) (054-111-052) Staff 

MA 113E Elements of Calculus 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or placement via NCSU Math Placement exam 

Credit is not allowed in more than one of MA 141, MA 112, MA 113. MA 113 may not be 

substituted for MA 141 as a curricular requirement. 

1915-2150 TuTh (054-113-051) Staff 

MA 114E Introduction to Finite Mathematics with Applications 3 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or equivalent completed in high school 

1945-2130 MW (054-114-051) Staff 

POLITICAL SCIENCE AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

PS 202E State and Local Government 3 

1730-1930 MTh (080-202-051) McClain 



121 



§ V 




SUMMER SESSIONS FACULTY 



Charlie Frank Abrams, Jr., Ph.D.. Professor. Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Gale Gordon Acuff, Jr., M.A.. Lecturer. English 

D. A. Adams, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Forestry and University Studies 

Elsayed M. Afify, Ph.D.. Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

Paul F. Agris, Ph.D.. Professor. Biochemistry 

Shuaib H. Ahmad, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Civil Engineering 

James A. Alchediak, M.A.. Lecturer. Speech-Communication 

William D. Allen, M.S.. Visiting Instructor. Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Sally V. Almekinders, M.Ed., Assistant Professor. Physical Education 

Ruth D. Anderson, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Speech-Communication 

Louise M. Antony, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Philosophy and Religion 

Frank B. Armstrong, Ph.D., Professor, Biochemistry 

John F. Arnold, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Curriculum and Instruction 

Sarah L. Ash, Ph.D.. Visiting Assistant Professor, Animal Science 

Lyn C. Aubrecht. Ph.D.. Adjunct Assistant Professor. Curriculum and Instruction 

David Franklin Austin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Philosophy and Religion 

C. W. Averre. III. Ph.D.. Professor. Plant Pathology 

Mahmoud Amin Ayoub, Ph.D.. Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B 

Lynne E. Baker-Ward, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Psychology 

David Ball, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Economics and Business 

Hershell Ray Ball, Jr., Ph.D., Professor, Food Science 

Pamela Banks-Lee, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Textile Engineering and Science 

Gwen Louise Barclay, M.A., Lecturer, English 

James C. Barker, Ph.D.. Extension Professor. Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Emma L. Barnhardt, M.A.T.. Lecturer, Mathematics 

Jon Bartley, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Economics and Business 

George O. Batton. B.S., Lecturer, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

Gerald Robert Baughman, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Robert L. Beckmann, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Botany 

William H. Beezley, Ph.D.. Professor, History 

Ray Braman Benson, Jr., Ph.D.. Professor, Materials Science and Engineering 

Henry A. Bent, Ph.D.. Professor. Chemistry 

Peter J. Bentley, Ph.D.. Burroughs Wellcome Distinguished Professor, Veterinary Medicine 

Roger L. Berger, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Statistics 

Herman J. Berkhoff. Ph.D.. Professor, Veterinary Medicine 

Gordon A. Berkstresser, III, Ph.D., Professor and Head, Textile Management and Technology 

A. Lynn Berle, M.Ed.. Assistant Professor. Physical Education 

Richard Harold Bernhard, Ph.D.. Professor. Industrial Engineering 

Leonidas Judd Betts, Jr., Ed.D., Associate Professor. English 

Michael G. Bevis. Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Marine. Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 

William L. Bingham, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Civil Engineering 

Paul Edward Bishop, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Microbiology 

Milton Clay Bliss, M.A.. Assistant Director, Music 

George B. Blum, Jr., MAE. Professor and Teaching Coordinator, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Michael A. Boles, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

Charles B. Boss, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Chemistry 

Robert W. Bottcher, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Laura J. Bottomley, M.S., Visiting Instructor. Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Edmond F. Bowden, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor, Chemistry 

Henry Dittimus Bowen. Ph.D., Professor, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Lawrence H. Bowen, Ph.D.. Professor. Chemistry 

Leon C. Boyd, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Food Science 

Albert S. Boyers, M.S.. Lecturer, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

R. R. Braham, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor, Forestry 

James J. Brickley, Ph.D.. Adjunct Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Robert C. Brisson, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Sociology and Anthropology 

Eugene Brooks, Ph.D.. Lecturer, Economics and Business 

Joel V. Brothers. M.A.T., Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

H. Larry Brown, M.S.. Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

Henry S. Brown, Ph.D.. Professor. Marine. Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 

James S. Brown, MSW. Assistant Professor. Sociology and Anthropology 

Talmage T. Brown, Jr., Ph.D.. Professor. Veterinary Medicine 

Thomas H. Brown, Jr., M.S., Visiting Instructor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

William S. Bryan. MWPS. Research Assistant and Teaching Technician. Wood and Paper Science 



123 



Sally B. Buckner, Ph.D.. Visiting Assistant Professor. Curriculum and Instruction 

Rita Layden Buhr, M.A.. Lecturer. English 

Carl L. Bumgardner, Ph.D.. Professor. Chemistry 

Kathryn Ann Burak, M.F.A.. Lecturer. English 

Robert P. Burns, M.Arch.. Professor, Design 

James L. Burrow, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Occupational Education 



Leon Raymond Camp. Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Speech-Communication 

John Robert Canada, Ph.D.. Professor. Industrial Engineering 

Patricia C. Caple, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Speech-Communication 

Roy Eugene Carawan, Ph.D., Associate Professor. Food Science 

Halbert H. Carmichael. Ph.D., Professor, Chemistry 

Ernest Carraway, J.D.. Lecturer, Economics and Business 

Daniel Edward Carroll, Jr., Ph.D.. Professor. Food Science 

George Louis Catignani, Jr., Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Food Science 

Thomas C. Caves, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Chemistry 

Richard Edward Chandler, Ph.D.. Professor, Mathematics 

A. C. Chao, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 

Harvey Johnson Charlton, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. Mathematics 

William A. Cheek, M.S.. Assistant Professor. Physical Education 

Rev T. Chern, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. Chemical Engineering 

Moody Chu, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Mathematics 

Lung Ock Chung, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Mathematics 

Timothy G. Clapp, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Textile Engineering and Science 

Edward Depriest Clark, Sr„ Ph.D., Associate Professor, English 

G. C. Cobb, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Physics 

Charles K. Coe, D.P.A.. Assistant Professor. Political Science and Public Administration 

Jo-Ann D. Cohen, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Mathematics 

Russell C. Combs, M.S., Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

A. W. Cooper, Ph.D., Professor and Head. Forestry 

Nelvin E. Cooper, M.E.. Associate Professor, Physical Education 

Alonzo F. Coots, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Chemistry 

John C. Cornwell, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Teaching Coordinator. Animal Science 

David Harrison Covington, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, English 

Harris Bradford Craig, Ph.D., Associate Director of Academic Affairs for the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

Director of the Agricultural Institute, and Professor of Food Science 

Judy Bush Crofton, M.A., Lecturer. English 

Cathy Crossland, Ed.D., Associate Professor, Curriculum and Instruction 

Michael Cuddy, Ph.D., Visiting Professor, Economics and Business 

Joseph W. Cunningham, Ph.D.. Professor, Psychology 

Susan J. Curtis, B.S., Visiting Lecturer, Computer Science 



Mark Anthony Daeschel, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor (USDA), Food Science 

Deborah W. Dalton, M.L.A., Associate Professor, Design 

John Michael Anthony Danby, Ph.D., Professor, Mathematics 

Jerry M. Daniels, M.A., Associate Professor, Physical Education 

C. B. Davey, Ph.D., Carl Alwin Schenck Professor, Forestry and Soil Science 

Judith A. Davis, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. Occupational Education 

W. R. Davis, Ph.D., Professor, Physics 

Harold Leroy Davison, M.A.T., Lecturer, Mathematics 

William R. Deere, MFA, Visiting Assistant Professor, Design 

Daniel A. DeJoy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Speech-Communication 

L. Richard Delia Fave, Ph.D., Professor, Sociology and Anthropology 

V. William DeLuca, Ed.D., Assistant Professor, Occupational Education 

James L. DeWitt, M.S., Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

Henry Evans Dickerson, M.A., Lecturer, English 

E. Jacquelin Dietz, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Statistics 

Walter Jerome Doborogosz, Ph.D.. Professor. Microbiology 

W. O. Doggett, Ph.D., Professor, Physics 

R. Alan Donaldson, Associateship in Textile Design, Associate Professor, Textile Management and Technology 

Matthew F. Drabick, B.A., Teaching Technician, Speech-Communication 

Louis Bynum Driggers, M.S., Extension Professor. Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Jack Davis Durant, Ph.D., Professor, English 



Yukiko Ebisuzaki, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Chemistry 

John A. Edwards, Ph.D., Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

R. A. Egler, B.A.. Lecturer, Physics 



124 



Malik E. Elbuluk, D.Sc. Visiting Assistant Professor. Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Gerald Hugh Elkan, Ph.D.. Professor. Microbiology 

Grace Walker Ellis, M.A.. Lecturer, English 

Risa S. Ellovich, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Sociology and Anthropology 

John F. Ely, Ph.D., Professor, Civil Engineering 

Donald A. Emery, Ph.D.. Professor and Teaching Coordinator, Crop Science 



Abdel Aziz Fahmy, Ph.D.. Professor. Materials Science and Engineering 

Keith Joseph Faivre, M.A., Lecturer, English 

M. H. Farrier, Ph.D., Professor, Entomology and Forestry 

Amassa Fauntleroy, Ph.D., Professor, Mathematics 

Robert Fearn, Ph.D., Professor. Economics and Business 

Lienne Catherine Federico, M.A.. Visiting Lecturer, English 

Barbara Anne Fennell, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor, English 

Anne Fisher, MPHIL. Visiting Lecturer. Economics and Business 

Doug Fisher, Ph.D.. Professor. Economics and Business 

Mark Fisher, M.B.A., Lecturer. Economics and Business 

David Flath, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Economics and Business 

Henry Pridgen Fleming, Ph.D.. Professor, Food Science 

James L. Flowers, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor, Occupational Education 

Edward Alan Foegeding, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor, Food Science 

Peggy Matthews Foegeding, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor, Food Science 

E. C. Franklin. Ph.D.. Professor. Forestry 

William G. Franklin, Ph.D.. Professor, Speech-Communication 

Katherine Frazier, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Economics and Business 

D. J. Frederick. Ph.D., Professor. Forestry 

Leon D. Freedman, Ph.D.. Professor. Chemistry 

John F. Freeman, Jr., M.S.. Lecturer. Occupational Education 

Ronald Owen Fulp, Ph.D., Professor, Mathematics 

Edward T. Funkhouser, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor, Speech-Communication 



W. E. Gardner, B.S., Extension Forest Resources Specialist, Forestry 

Edwin Roland Gerler, Jr., Ed.D., Associate Professor. Counselor Education 

Forrest W. Getzen, Ph.D., Professor, Chemistry 

Francis G. Giesbrecht, Ph.D., Professor, Statistics 

John H. Gilbert, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Political Science and Public Administration 

Robert C. Gilmore, M.W.Tech.. Associate Professor, Wood and Paper Science 

Jennifer Moreland Ginn, M.A., Lecturer, English 

Joseph Conrad Glass, Jr., Ed.D.. Professor, Adult and Community College Education 

L. F. Grand, Ph.D.. Professor. Plant Pathology and Forestry 

Laura Caruso Grannan, M.F.A., Lecturer, English 

David P. Green, M.S., Extension Specialist, Food Science 

J. D. Gregory. Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Forestry 

Max Edwin Gregory, Ph.D., Extension Professor, Food Science 

Thomas J. Grennes, M.A., Professor, Economics and Business 

Harriette Griffin, M.E., Lecturer, Economics and Business 

William Griffith, Ph.D.. Visiting Professor, Adult and Community College Education 

Georges Guirguis, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

A. K. Gupta, Ph.D.. Professor, Civil Engineering 

B. S. Gupta, Ph.D.. Professor and Assistant Department Head, Textile Engineering and Science 
Robert G. Gwyn, M.A.T.. Assistant Professor. Physical Education 

H 

Robert J. Hader, Ph.D.. Professor Emeritus. Statistics 

W. L. Hafley, Ph.D., Professor, Forestry and Statistics 

Francis J. Hale, Sc.D.. Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

G. L. Hall, Ph.D.. Professor. Physics 

Max Halperen. Ph.D., Professor. English 

Donald Dale Hamann. Ph.D.. Professor, Food Science 

Robert Michael Hambourger, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Philosophy and Religion 

R. A. Hamilton, M.F.. Extension Forest Resource Specialist and Coordinator. Private Woodland Program, Forestry 

Frank Milton Hammond, Ed.D., Assistant Director. Music 

Gail A. Hankins, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Speech-Communication 

Orlando E. Hankins, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Nuclear Engineering 

Arthur Paul Hansen, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Food Science 

Marianna Dail Hardison, M.A., Lecturer, English 

Harry Allen Hargrave, Ph.D., Associate Professor, English 

Charles W. Harper, Jr., Ed.D., Associate Professor, Curriculum and Instruction 



125 



Connie Marie Harris, M.A.. Lecturer. English 

William C. Harris, Ph.D.. Professor. History 

Antony Howard Harrison, Ph.D., Professor. English 

Robert Eduard Hartwig, Ph.D.. Professor. Mathematics 

Wayne Earle Haskin. M.A.. Assistant Professor. English 

A. E. Hassan. Ph.D.. Professor and Director. Forestry Equipment Systems Cooperation. Forestry 

Hosni Moustafa Hassan, Ph.D., Professor. Food Science 

W. J. Haynie, III. Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Occupational Education 

Charles K. Henrikson, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Veterinary Medicine 

Forrest C. Hentz, Jr., Ph.D., Professor, Chemistry 

James Hess, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Economics and Business 

Marvin Thomas Hester. Ph.D.. Professor, English 

Gary D. Hill, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Sociology and Anthropology 

Garland K. Hilliard, Jr., M.S.. Lecturer, Occupational Education 

Joseph P. Hobbs, Ph.D.. Professor. History 

Elizabeth W. Hodges. M.A.. Visiting Lecturer. Computer Science 

Larry F. Hodges, M.S.. Visiting Instructor. Computer Science 

Thomas H. Hodgson. Ph.D., Professor. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

Robert L. Hoffman, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. University Studies and Botany 

D. L. Holley, Ph.D.. Professor. Forestry 

Linda Tarte Holley, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. English 

William Thomas Holloman, III, M.S.. Assistant Director, Cooperative Education Program. Provost's Office 

Abraham Holtzman, Ph.D.. Professor. Political Science and Public Administration 

Thomas Honeycutt, Ph.D.. Associate Professor and Associate Department Head. Computer Science 

Willard E. Hooker, MLA. Associate Professor. Horticultural Science 

Carol Leigh Hoppe. M.A.. Lecturer. English 

Grace Shaw Home, M.A.. Lecturer. English 

H. Robert Horton. Ph.D.. William Neal Reynolds Professor. Biochemistry 

Samuel M. Hudson, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor, Textile Chemistry 

John Huggard, J.D.. Lecturer, Economies and Business 

Z. Z Hugus, Jr., Ph.D.. Professor. Chemistry 

Frank James Humenik, Ph.D.. Professor and Associate Head in Charge of Extension. Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering 

Ervin Grigg Humphries, Ph.D.. Professor. Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Theodore M. Hyman, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Sociology and Anthropology 



A. W. Jenkins, Jr., Ph.D.. Professor. Physics 

L. G. Jervis, M.F.. Associate Professor. Forestry 

C. E. Johnson, Ph.D.. Professor, Physics 

Richard Johnson, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

Robert Edward Johnston, Ph.D., Associate Professor. Microbiology 

C. P. Jones, Ph.D.. Professor, Economics and Business 

Louis A. Jones, Ph.D.. Professor. Chemistry 

R. K. Jones, Ph.D.. Professor. Plant Pathology 

Victor Alan Jones. Ph.D.. Professor and Teaching Coordinator. Food Science 

Harold Joseph, Ed.D.. Visiting Associate Professor. Adult and Community College Education 

K 

Joseph S. Kahn, Ph.D.. Professor. Biochemistry 

James W. Kalat, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Psychology 

Rohinton Karanjia, M.S.. Visiting Lecturer, Economics and Business 

John Kascenska, II, M.S.Ed.. Lecturer. Physical Education 

Steven Barry Katz. M.A.. Instructor. English 

J. Frank Kauffman, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

J. C. Keith, Ph.D.. Visiting Associate Professor. Physics 

Carl Timothy Kelley, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Mathematics 

R. C. Kellison, Ph.D.. Professor and Director. Forestry 

Myron W. Kelly, Ph.D.. Professor. Wood and Paper Science 

Richard F. Keltie, Ph.D.. Associate Professor and Director. Center for Sound and Vibration. Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering 

Sanford H. Kessler, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Political Science and Public Administration 

Haig Khachatoorian, M.SCI.. Professor. Design 

S. Khorram. Ph.D., Professor. Forestry and Acting Director. Computer Graphics Center 

Judy Ray Kidd, M.A.. Lecturer. English 

Michael M. Kimberley, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 

Claudia Kimbrough, M.B.A.. Lecturer. Economics and Business 

Doris E. King, Ph.D.. Professor. History 

Sondra L. Kirsch, M.S.. Associate Professor. Recreation Resources Administration 

Todd Robert Klaenhammer, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Food Science 

W. L. Klarman. Ph.D.. Professor and Head. Plant Pathology 

M. A. Klenin, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Physics 



126 



James A. Knopp, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Biochemistry 

Robert Charles Koehersberger, M.S.. Visiting Lecturer. English 

Kwangil Koh, Ph.D.. Professor, Mathematics 

J. R. Kolb, Ph.D.. Professor. Mathematics and Science Education and Mathematics 

Jonathan Charles Kramer, B.S., Assistant Director, Music 

Paul Kupiec, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. Economics and Business 

Pamela P. Kuzminski, Ph.D.. Visiting Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction 



J. G. Laarman, Ph.D., Associate Professor. Forestry 

Thomas Joseph Lada, Ph.D., Associate Professor. Mathematics 

Fred Lado. Jr., Ph.D.. Professor. Physics 

Wayne Lamble. Ph.D.. Visiting Professor. Adult and Community College Education 

R. A. Lancia, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Forestry 

Tyre Calvin Lanier, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Food Science 

John Lapp, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Economics and Business 

Duane K. Larick, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Food Science 

Dana A. Lasher, B.S., Adjunct Lecturer. Computer Science 

Charles A. Lassiter, Ph.D.. Professor and Department Head. Animal Science 

Alexander Laufer, Ph.D.. Visiting Professor. Civil Engineering 

James VV. Leach, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

Virginia M. Leath, M.Ed.. Assistant Professor. Physical Education 

Terri Thornberg Leith, M.A.. Lecturer, English 

Harold Dresner Levin, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Philosophy and Religion 

Joseph Levine, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor, Philosophy and Religion 

Samuel G. Levine, Ph.D.. Professor, Chemistry 

Stanley Liebowitz, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Economics and Business 

Russell Linderman, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Chemistry 

Cheryl R. Lindhome, M.S.. Visiting Instructor, Computer Science 

David R. Lineback, Ph.D.. Professor and Department Head, Food Science 

G. Gilbert Long, Ph.D.. Professor. Chemistry 

Larry W. Long, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Speech-Communication 

Ian S. Longmuir. M.B.. B. Chir.. Professor. Biochemistry 

Carolyn S. Love, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Recreation Resources Administration 

Shaun Love, M.Sc. Visiting Instructor, Computer Science 

Geraldine Hobson Luginbuhl, Ph.D., Associate Professor. Microbiology 

Jiang Luh, Ph.D.. Professor. Mathematics 

Charles F. Lytle, Ph.D.. Professor. Zoology and Teaching Coordinator, Biological Sciences 

M 

John Munro Mackenzie, Jr., Ph.D.. Associate Professor and Coordinator of the Electron Microscope Center. 

Microbiology 

Clarence J. Maday. Ph.D.. Professor. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

Karen Marie Majewski, M.A.. Lecturer. English 

Linda S. Malami, M.Ed.. Assistant Director. Cooperative Education 

B. Malpiedi, Ed.D.. Assistant Professor. Occupational Education 

Ann Ferguson Mann, M.S.. Instructional Coordinator for the Academic Advancement Program for Student Athletics 
and Lecturer. English 

C. Paul Marsh. M.S., Professor. Sociology and Anthropology 
David B. Marsland, Ph.D.. Professor. Chemical Engineering 
Donald C. Martin, Ph.D.. Professor, Computer Science 
Robert H. Martin. Jr., Ph.D.. Professor. Mathematics 

Frances W. Massey, M.S.. Assistant Professor. Textile Management and Technology 

Vernon C. Matzen. Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Civil Engineering 

E. Stuart Maxwell, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Biochemistry 

David W. McClintock, Ph.D.. Visiting Associate Professor. University Studies and Graduate Office 

William Fred McClure, Ph.D., Professor, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Marilyn Sugg McCollum, M.S., Lecturer, Mathematics 

Patrick H. McDonald, Jr., Ph.D.. Harrelson Professor. Civil Engineering 

Michael McElroy. Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Economics and Business 

Roger Floyd McFeeters, Ph.D., U.S.D.A. Professor, Food Science 

Arnold James McKee, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Economics and Business 

Thoyd Melton, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Microbiology 

Carl Dean Meyer, Jr., Ph.D.. Professor. Mathematics and Director, Center for Research and Scientific Computation. 

Computer Science 

Walter Earl Meyers, Ph.D.. Professor. English 

Marion Miles, Ph.D.. Professor and Assistant Head. Laboratories and Facilities. Chemistry 

Carolyn S. Miller, M.S.. Visiting Instructor. Computer Science 

Dan Clinton Miller, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. English 

Eric Scott Miller. Ph.D., Assistant Professor. Microbiology 

William L. Miller, Ph.D.. Professor. Biochemistry 

Kailash Misra. Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Mathematics 



127 



Gary N. Mock, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Assistant Department Head, Textile Chemistry 

Subhas C. Mohapatra, Ph.D., Senior Researcher. Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Charles Moreland, Ph.D.. Professor, Graduate Studies and Assistant Head. Chemistry 

J. R. Mowat, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Physics 

Robert Bruce Mullin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Philosophy and Religion 

Harry E. Munn, Jr., Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Speech-Communication 

N 

Thomas Nelson, M.Div., Visiting Lecturer, Computer Science 

Gordon D. Newby, Ph.D., Associate Professor, History 

Craig Newmark, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor, Economics and Business 

Paul Adrian Nickel, Ph.D., Professor, Mathematics 

Gifford S. Nickerson, Ph.D., Associate Professor. Sociology and Anthropology 



Ann Ortiz, M.A.. Visiting Lecturer, Foreign Languages and Literatures 



Janet Taylor Palmer, B.A., Lecturer, English 

Chia-Ven Pao, Ph.D.. Professor, Mathematics 

J. Y. Park, Ph.D.. Professor, Physics 

Charles A. Parker, Ph.D., Professor, Speech-Communication 

G. W. Parker, III, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Physics 

Leo W. Parks, Ph.D., Professor and Head, Microbiology 

Charles E. Patch, M.S., Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

Ruth M. Patterson, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor, Occupational Education 

Sue P. Patterson, M.Ed., Lecturer, Occupational Education 

Philip M. Pavlik, A.B., Visiting Lecturer, Political Science and Public Administration 

R. L. Peace, J.D., Lecturer, Economics and Business 

R. J. Peeler, Ph.D., Professor, Economics and Business 

Jerome John Perry, Ph.D.. Professor, Microbiology 

Howard Aldridge Petrea, M.A., Associate Professor, Mathematics 

Robert Bruce Petters, Ph.D., Assistant Director, Music 

Christine M. Pierce, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Philosophy and Religion 

Dwain Harvey Pilkington, Ph.D., Extension Associate Professor and Extension Specialist, Food Science 

Beryl Cox Pittman, B.S., Lecturer, English 

Kenneth H. Pollock, Ph.D., Professor, Statistics 

Samuel B. Pond, III, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Psychology 

Susan Bittner Pond, M.A., Lecturer, English 

Thomas Hague Poston, M.A., Lecturer, English 

Carmine Andrew Prioli, Ph.D., Associate Professor, English 

Ruie J. Pritchard, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Curriculum and Instruction 

Charles H. Proctor, Ph.D., Professor, Statistics 

Suzanne T. Purrington, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Chemistry 

Q 

Charles P. Quesenberry, Ph.D., Professor, Statistics 



Suresh Rai, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Robert Todd Ramsay, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Mathematics 

David W. Reid, B.S., Visiting Instructor, Computer Science 

Marcia Lynn Retchin, M.A., Lecturer, English 

Jeffrey Hamilton Richards, Ph.D.. Lecturer, English 

Thomas Charles Richardson, Ph.D., Lecturer, English 

Fatih A. Rifki, M.Arch., Assistant Professor, Design 

Barbara Risman, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Sociology and Anthropology 

M. L. Robinson, Jr., Ed.D., Associate Professor, Textile Management and Technology 

Joanne W. Rockness, Ph.D., Associate Professor. Economics and Business 

C. J. Roddy, B.S., Lecturer, Physics 

Jesus Rodriguez, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Mathematics 

June Emma Rohrbach, M.Ed., Lecturer, Mathematics 

Roger P. Rohrbach, Ph.D., Professor, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

J. P. Roise, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Forestry 

Robert Rossana, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Economics and Business 

Irwin Rovner, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Sociology and Anthropology 

Willard I). Ruchte, B.S.. Adjunct Lecturer, Computer Science 



128 



Lawrence Sheldon Rudner, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. English 

J. H. Ruff, Ph.D.. Professor and Head. Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

James Lorin Rulla, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. Mathematics 

John Eual Rushing, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist. Food Science 

Burton L. Russell, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Speech-Communication 



Ronald H. Sack, Ph.D.. Professor. History 

L. M. Safley, Jr., Ph.D., Professor, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Hans Sagan, Ph.D.. Professor, Mathematics 

Debie D. Saidla, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Counselor Education 

Marilyn G. Schiermeier, M.Ed., Lecturer, Mathematics 

Robert L. Schrag, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Speech-Communication 

Anton F. Schreiner, Ph.D., Professor, Chemistry 

Steven J. Schwartz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. Food Science 

R. R. Sederoff. Ph.D., Professor, Forestry 

James Francis Selgrade, Ph.D.. Professor. Mathematics 

Brian William Sheldon, Ph.D., Associate Professor. Food Science 

Scott H. Shore, Ph.D.. Visiting Assistant Professor, Microbiology 

Robert Silber, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Mathematics 

Lawrence M. Silverberg, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

Genevieve C. Sims, M.P.A., Visiting Lecturer, Political Science and Public Administration 

Edward C. Sisler, Ph.D., Professor. Biochemistry and Botany 

Richard Wayne Skaggs, Ph.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

C. J. Skender, M.B.A.. Lecturer. Economics and Business 
William Sloan, M.B.A.. Visiting Lecturer, Economics and Business 
Frederick O. Smetana, Ph.D., Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 
Carl Brent Smith, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Textile Chemistry 

Frank J. Smith, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Psychology 

J. C. Smith, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Civil Engineering 

John David Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor. History 

Norwood Graham Smith, M.A., Associate Professor, English 

R. R. Smith, M.S.. Lecturer. Physical Education 

Vince Smith, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor. Economics and Business 

W. D. Smith, M.S.. Lecturer, Forestry 

Ronald Ernest Sneed, Ph.D., Extension Professor, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Samuel S. Snyder, Jr., Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Psychology 

Anthony Solari, M.A., Visiting Lecturer, Political Science and Public Administration 

Constance Altman Sowell, M.A., Visiting Lecturer, English 

Robert S. Sowell, Ph.D., Professor and Graduate Administrator. Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Clayton L. Stalnaker, M.A., Lecturer, University Studies and Philosophy and Religion 

D. H. J. Steensen, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Forestry 
Allen Frederick Stein, Ph.D., Professor. English 
Edward Stejskal, Ph.D.. Professor, Chemistry 

Robert E. Sternloff, Ph.D., Professor, Recreation Resources Administration 

S. Christopher Stevenson, Ph.D.. Visiting Associate Professor. Curriculum and Instruction 

John G. Stewart, M.A.. Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

Lee V. Stiff, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. Mathematics and Science Education 

Larry F. Stikeleather, Ph.D.. Professor, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Ernest Lester Stitzinger, Ph.D., Professor, Mathematics 

Anne-Marie Stomp, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Forestry 

Charles Wilson Suggs, Ph.D., Professor. Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Harold Everett Swaisgood, Ph.D., William Neal Reynolds Professor. Food Science 

Kenneth Ray Swartzel, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Food Science 

James E. Swiss, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Political Science and Public Administration 

William L. Switzer, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Chemistry 



Fred Russell Tarver, Jr., Ph.D., Extension Professor and Extension Specialist. Food Science 

Elizabeth C. Theil, Ph.D.. Professor. Biochemistry 

Frank Bancroft Thomas Ph.D., Extension Professor and Extension Specialist. Food Science 

Randall J. Thomson, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Sociology and Anthropology 

Terrence A. Tollefson, Ph.D., Visiting Lecturer. Adult and Community College Education 

Charles Tomasino, Ph.D.. Professor. Textile Chemistry 

Donald T. Tomaskovic-Devey, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor. Sociology and Anthropology 

Samuel B. Tove. Ph.D.. William Neal Reynolds Professor, Biochemistry 

Kay M. Troost, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Sociology and Anthropology 

Robert T. Troxler, MIA. Assistant Professor. Occupational Education 

Paul A. Tucker, Jr., Ph.D., Professor. Textile Management and Technology 

William Tucker, Ph.D., Professor and Head, Undergraduate Studies. Chemistry 

Marianne M. Turnbull, HSD, Health Educator. Student Health Services 



129 



Carl Turner, Ph.D.. Professor. Economics and Business 

Lvnn Gilbert Turner. Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Food Science 



David Frederick Ullrich, Ph.D., Associate Professor. Mathematics 
Odell Uzzell, Ph.D.. Professor, Sociology and Anthropology 



Richard Van Breeman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Chemistry 
James C. Vanderkam, Ph.D., Professor, Philosophy and Religion 
William J. VanderWall, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Occupational Education 
Albert Donald VanDeVeer, Ph.D., Professor. Philosophy and Religion 
K. Steven Vincent, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. History 

W 

George H. Wahl, Jr., Ph.D., Professor, Chemistry 
Michael L. Walden, Ph.D., Professor, Economics and Business 
N. William Walker, Ed.D., Associate Professor. Psychology 
Gary E. Wall, M.S.. Lecturer, Physical Education 

James M. Wallace, III, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Sociology and Anthropology 
William Mood Walter, Jr., Ph.D.. U.S.D.A. Professor. Food Science 
Donn R. Ward, Ph.D.. Specialist-In-Charge, Food Science 
Eleania Bailey Ward, B.M.E., Assistant Director. Music 

William M. Waters, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Mathematics and Science Education and Mathematics 
Larry W. Watson, Ed.D.. Associate Professor. Mathematics and Science Education 
Gary Roy Weinberg, M.A., Lecturer, English 
Eleanor F. Weinel. M.Arc, Assistant Professor. Design 
R. J. Weir, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Forestry 
R. E. Wenig, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Occupational Education 
Dennis Wertz, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Chemistry 
Oscar Wesler, Ph.D., Professor, Statistics and Mathematics 
Walter Wessels, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Economics and Business 
Bert W. Westbrook, Ed.D., Professor, Psychology 

Philip W. Westerman, Ph.D., Professor, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

William David Weston, Ph.D., Director, Cooperative Education and Visiting Assistant Professor, Educational Leader- 
ship and Program Evaluation 
Myung Whangbo, Ph.D.. Professor, Chemistry 

John H. Wheatley, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Mathematics and Science Education 
Charles M. Williams, M.S., Visiting Instructor. Poultry Science 
Lavern Williams, Jr., M.A., Instructor, Mathematics 
Norman F. Williamson, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor. Computer Science 
Daniel H. Willits, Ph.D.. Professor, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 
Jack Wilson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Economics and Business 
Edward Hempstead Wiser, Ph.D.. Professor, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 
Bernard W. Wishy, Ph.D., Professor. History 

I. J. Won, Ph.D., Professor, Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 
Eric M. Woodrum, Ph.D.. Associate Professor, Sociology and Anthropology 
Stephen Joseph Wright, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Mathematics 
Tommy E. Wynn, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Botany 



Clyde Thomas Young, Ph.D., Professor, Food Science 

James Herbert Young, Ph.D., Professor, Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Robert Vaughan Young, Jr., Ph.D., Professor. English 



Matthew Zingraff, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Sociology and Anthropology 

Carl F. Zorowski, Ph.D., Director of IMSE Institute and R. J. Reynolds Professor. Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering 

G. J. Zuckerman, Ph.D.. Associate Professor. Economics and Business 



130 







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1 2 3 

DRTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY 




NO BUILDING NAME 

1 Alexander Residence Hat 

2 Alumm Memorial Building 

3 Bagwell Residence Hall 

4 Becton Residence Hall 

5 Berry Residence Hall 

6 BiltmoreHall 

7 Bowen Residence Hall 

8 Bragaw Residence Hall 

9 Brooks Hall 

10 Brooks Hall AddUUon 

1 i Broughton Hall 

12 Burlington Engineering I 

Bureau at Mines _ 

Carmrchael Gymnasiurr 
Carroll Residence Hall 
Case Athletics Center 
Central Stores 
Chancellor's Residence 





^3 



BUILDING NAME 

Nelson Textile Building 
1911 Building 
Owen Residence Hall 
Page Han 
Park Shops 
Patterson Hall 
Peele Hall 
; Physical Plant Mamt Center 
Physical Plant Shops (Armoryl 
Phytotron 
Poe Hall 
Polk Hall 
Power Plant 
Price Music Center 
Primrose Hall 

Print Shop/ University Graphics 
Quad Snack Bar 
Wm Neal Reynolds Coliseum 



GRID CODE 



PHY 
POE 



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Cultural Center 

Dabney Hall 

Daniels Hall 

McKimmon Extension Continuing 

Education Center 
Farm Unit 5 
Field House 
Fraternity Court 
Gardner Hall 
Bostian Hall 
Gold Residence Hall 
Williams Hall Addition 
Greenhouse— Biological Sciences 
Greenhouse— Horticulture 
Greenhouse— 840 Method Rd 
Q reenho us e— Ptant Pathology 
Gnnnells Animal Health Lab 
Harrelson Hall 

Harris Hall 

D H Hill Library— Original Wing 
H Hill Lib'ary— Book Stack Tower 
D H Hill Library— Erdahl-Cloyd Wir 

Nonh Campus Bookshop 
Hillsborough Building 
Hodges Wood Products Lab 
Hoiiaday Hall 

Information Center. Visitor Parking 
Mgore Hall 
Laundry/Copy Center 
Lsazar Han 

Residence HaJj 



Mann Hall 

E S King Village (17 Apt Bldgs A-Qi 

Memorial Tower 

Mttcait Residence Hall 

Morns Building 



DAB 
DAN 



AGH 
BSG 

HGH 



Riddick Engineering Labs 

Riddick Stadium 

Robertson Wing, Biltmore Hall 

Schaub Food Science Building 

Scott Hall 

Steam Plant 

NCSU Bookstores 

Sullivan Residence Hall 

Syme Residence Hall 

Television Center 

Thompson Theater/Craft Center 

Tompkins Hall 

Tucker Residence Hall 

Turlington Residence Hall 

Turner House 
♦ U ni v er s ity Student-Center 

Watauga Hall 

Weaver Laboratories 

Weed Control Laboratories 

Welch Residence Hall 

Williams Hall 

Winston Hall 

Withers Hall 

North Residence Hall 

Caldwell Hall 

Weisiger-Brown Building (GAFi 

South Residence Hall 

Dining Hall 

Solar Demonstration House 

Administrative Services Center 

Research Facility (on Centennial Campus) (Not S 
StudenTServlce Cemer 

Natural Resources Research Center 

COURTS AND FIELDS GRIO 

Bagwell-Becton-Berry Quad 2-C 

Gold-Welch-Syme-Brooks Court 2-C 

Mary E. Yarbrough Court : 3-B 

Court of North Carolina 3-B 

Gardner Arboretum 4-C 

University Plaza (Brickyardl 5-C 

University Student Center Plaza 4-D 

Turlington-Alexander Court 4-D 

Tucker-Owen Court 4-D 

Lee-Sullivan-Bragaw Court 5-E 

Fraternity Court 4-F 

E S King Village Court 
PauiH Derr Track 
Miller Fields 
Doak Field 

McKimmon Center Court 
The Big Acre 
Tennis Courts 



WMS. 
WN 



4-C 
3-A 
4-B 
2-D 
3-D 



6-E 



4-E 

6-E 



PARKING LOTS 

Brooks Ave Lot 
Carmichael Lot 
Coliseum Bays 
East Coliseum Lot 
Friendly Drive Lot 
Harris Lot 
Hillsborough Building Lots 

.Parking Dock 

Riddick Lot 

Sullivan Lots 

West Lot 

Additional West Lot Parking 

Yarbrough Lot 

Hillsborough Square North 



6-E 

GRID 

6-C 
3-0 
3-D 
2-C 
6-D 
4-E 
6-C 

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1988-1990 
GRADUATE CATALOG 



RTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY 






December 1987 



P*mr 



2 * 




Prominent in the above aerial of the central North Carolina State 
University campus are three high-rise residence halls 
(foreground), the circular Harrelson Hall with the adjacent towers 
of Cox and Dabney Halls, and in the upper left, the tower of the 
D. H. Hill Library. The central campus encompasses some 623 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

VOLUME 87 DECEMBER 1987 NUMBER 4 

(USPS 393-040) 

Published four times a year in February. June, August and December by North Carolina State University, Department of 
Admissions, Peele Hall. Box 7103, Raleigh, N. C. 27695-7103. Second class postage paid at Raleigh. N. C. 27611. 




North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Graduate Catalog 

1988-90 



s 



v^ 



m 





■ 



- 




K ••*■*.-. 



CONTENTS 

North Carolina State University 4 

Administration, North Carolina State University 6 

Administration, University of North Carolina 395 

The Calendar 8 

The Graduate School 12 

Graduate Student Association 12 

General Information 13 

Application 13 

International Students 14 

Admission 15 

Registration and Records 18 

Tuition and Fees 20 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships 25 

Other Financial Aid 28 

Military Education and Training 29 

Health Services 30 

Housing 31 

Graduate Programs 33 

Master's Degrees 35 

Master of Science and Master of Arts 35 

Master's Degree in a Designated Field 39 

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education Degrees 41 

The D. H. Hill Library 48 

Institutes 49 

Special Laboratories and Facilities 50 

Special Programs 59 

University Patent and Copyright Procedures 59 

Fields of Instruction 68 

Graduate Faculty 341 

Board of Trustees and Board of Governors 397-398 

Index 399 

Campus Map 402-403 



4 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

North Carolina State University is one of the nation's major public universities 
large, complex, national and international in scope, and a leader in education and 
research. It ranks among the top universities in the nation and shares the distinc- 
tive character of Land-Grant state universities nationally broad academic offer- 
ings, extensive public service, national and international activities, and large- 
scale extension and research programs. 

North Carolina State University is committed to equality of educational oppor- 
tunity and does not discriminate against applicants, students, or employees based 
on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age or handicap. Moreover, N. C. 
State University is open to people of all races and actively seeks to promote racial 
integration by recruiting and enrolling a larger number of black students. 

N. C. State's rich and varied academic program is comprised of 86 undergrad- 
uate degree programs spanning 82 fields of study, 105 master's degree programs 
spanning 75 fields of study, 48 doctoral degree programs and the doctor of 
veterinary medicine program. The University offers approximately 2,900 
courses. 

Research activities span a broad spectrum of about 1 ,400 scientific, technologi- 
cal and scholarly endeavors with a budget of more than $100 million annually. 

Extension organizations in each of the 100 counties in North Carolina and in 
the Cherokee Indian Reservation assist in carrying the University's teaching and 
applied research programs throughout the State. The diversity of these pro- 
grams spans such fields as agriculture, design, education, engineering, forestry, 
humanities, marine sciences, textiles, urban affairs and veterinary medicine. 

The annual University budget is more than $345 million and it has approxi- 
mately 5,600 employees. There are more than 2,900 faculty and professional staff, 
including 1,500 graduate faculty and 250 adjunct faculty. 

There are 171 campus buildings on the central campus of 623 acres. In addi- 
tion, the University has acquired an adjacent property of 900 acres which will 
allow expansion. It has some 88,000 acres on a statewide basis, including one 
research and endowment forest of 78,000 acres. Near the main campus are 
research farms; biology and ecology sites; genetics, horticulture and floriculture 
nurseries; forests and other areas such as Carter-Finley Stadium, which together 
comprise about 2,500 acres. 

The University's total enrollment is more than 24,500 including approximately 
17,300 undergraduate students, 3,800 graduate students and 3,400 lifelong edu- 
cation students. The total student population is made up of approximately 9,200 
women and 15,300 men including 2,290 blacks and 1,896 other minority students. 
Students come to N. C. State from nearly every state in the nation and at least 91 
foreign countries are represented by the more than 1,100 international students. 

The University is organized in eight colleges, the School of Design and the 
Graduate School. The eight schools are Agriculture and Life Sciences, Educa- 
tion, Engineering, Forest Resources, Humanities and Social Sciences, Physical 
and Mathematical Sciences, Textiles, and Veterinary Medicine. In addition, a 
complex of divisions and programs provides for a wide range of special programs 
in academic affairs, research and extension. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



North Carolina State University is one of the three Research Triangle Univer- 
sities along with Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. In the 30-mile triangle formed by the three universities is the 5,500-acre 
Research Triangle Park; the Research Triangle Institute, a subsidiary of the 
three universities; and the Triangle Universities Computation Center, a central 
facility for the extensive computing centers of the institutions. 

NCSU is a member of the National Association of State Universities and 
Land-Grant Colleges. It is also a member of the American Council on Education, 
the College Entrance Examination Board, the Council of Graduate Schools in the 
United States, the National Commission on Accrediting, and the Southern Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Schools. 

The University is accredited by national and regional accrediting agencies 
applicable to the University and its numerous professional fields. 

Nondiscrimination Statement 

North Carolina State University is dedicated to equality of opportunity within 
its community. Accordingly, North Carolina State University does not practice 
or condone discrimination, in any form, against students, emplolyees or appli- 
cants on the grounds of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age or handicap. 
North Carolina State University commits itself to positive action to secure equal 
opportunity regardless of those characteristics. 

North Carolina State University supports the protection available to members 
of its community under all applicable Federal laws, including Titles VI and VII 
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 
Sections 799A and 845 of the Public Health Service Act, the Equal Pay and Age 
Discrimination Acts, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Vietnam Veterans 
Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, and Executive Order 11246. For informa- 
tion concerning these provisions, contact: 

Dr. Lawrence M. Clark 

Associate Provost & Affirmative Action Officer 

201 Holladay Hall 

P. 0. Box 7101 

North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7101 

Phone: 919/737-3409 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



ADMINISTRATION 

Bruce R. Poulton. Chancellor 

Nash N. Winstead, Provost and Vice Chancellor 

Debra W. Stewart, Interim Vice Provost and Dean of Graduate School 

Franklin D. Hart, Vice Chancellor for Research 

George L. Worsley, Vice Chancellor for Finance and Business 

William L. Turner, Vice Chancellor for Extension and Public Service 

Thomas H. Stafford Jr., Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs 

John T. Kanipe Jr., Vice Chancellor for Foundations and University Relations 

Deans of Colleges and Schools 

Durward F. Bateman, Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Claude E. McKinney, Design 

Carl J. Dolce, Education and Psychology 

Larry K. Monteith, Engineering 

Eric L. Ellwood, Forest Resources 

William B. Toole III, Humanities and Social Sciences 

Garrett Briggs, Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

Robert A. Barnhardt, Textiles 

Terrence M. Curtin, Veterinary Medicine 

Graduate School— Administrative Office 

D. W. Stewart, Interim Vice Provost and Dean 
A. M. Witherspoon, Associate Dean 
D. A. Emery, Acting Associate Dean 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Graduate School — Administrative Board 

D. W. Stewart, Interim Dean 

A. M. Witherspoon, Associate Dean 
D. A. Emery, Acting Associate Dean 

B. F. Beers, Professor of History 

R. D. Bereman, Professor of Chemistry; Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs, College of Physical and 
Mathematical Sciences 

D. R. Buchanan, Professor of Textile Engineering 
and Science 

D. W. Dalton, Associate Professor of Landscape 
Architecture 

S. E. Elmaghraby, University Professor of Industrial 
Engineering and Operations Research; Director of 
the Operations Research Program 

H. A. Exum, Associate Professor of Counselor 
Education; Associate Dean for Research 
and Graduate Studies, College of Education 

J. K. Ferrell, Alcoa Professor of Chemical 
Engineering; Director of Graduate 
Programs, College of Engineering 

A. Fingeret, Associate Professor 
of Adult and Community 
College Education 

B. H. Johnson, Professor of Animal Science 
and Graduate Administrator 

E. J. Kamprath, William Neal Reynolds Professor 
of Soil Science 

G. E. Mitchell, Professor of Physics; Associate 
Head of the Department and Graduate Administrator 

R. G. Pearson, Professor of Wood and Paper 
Science and Graduate Administrator 

D. G. Simmons, Professor of Veterinary Medicine, 
Microbiology and Poultry Science 



Term Expires 



April, 1989 
June, 1990 



September, 1988 
August, 1989 
December, 1989 

June, 1991 

June, 1990 

June, 1991 

November, 1989 
June, 1991 
March, 1991 
June, 1991 
April, 1988 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



THE CALENDAR 



FALL SEMESTER, 1987 



August 21 



Fri. 



August 24 
September 7 
September 8 


Mon. 
Mon. 
Tues. 


September 21 


Mon. 


October 2 
October 9 
October 14 
October 23 


Fri. 
Fri. 
Wed. 
Fri. 


November 6 


Fri. 



November 24 
November 30 
December 4 
December 7-12 
December 14-15 


Tues. 

Mon. 

Fri. 

Mon.-Sat. 

Mon.-Tues. 


SPRING SEMESTER, 1988 


January 8 


Fri. 


January 11 
January 25 


Mon. 
Mon. 


February 8 


Mon. 


February 22 
March 4 
March 14 
March 18 


Mon. 
Fri. 
Mon. 
Fri. 



Registration/change day (late registration, 
drop/add.) 

First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Last day to add a course; last day to withdraw 
or drop a course with a refund. 
Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 
Mid-semester reports due. 
Fall vacation begins at 10:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 7:50 a.m. 
Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 level 
without a grade. 

Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School, in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees, by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in December, 1987. Last 
day for unconditional pass on final oral exam- 
inations by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 

Thanksgiving vacation begins at 10:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 7:50 a.m. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 
Final examinations. 



Registration/change day (late registration, 

drop/add.) 

First day of classes. 

Last day to add a course; last day to withdraw 

or drop a course with a refund. 

Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 

below without a grade. 

Mid-semester reports due. 

Spring vacation begins at 10:00 p.m. 

Classes resume at 7:50 a.m. 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 level 

without a grade. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



March 25 



Fri. 



April 4 


Mon. 


April 22 


Fri. 


April 25-30 


Mon. -Sat. 


May 2-3 


Mon.-Tues, 


May 7 


Sat. 



Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School, in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees, by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in May, 1988. Last day 
for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tions by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 
Holiday 

Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 
Final examinations. 
Commencement. 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1988 
First Session 



May 23 
May 24 
May 30 

June 3 

June 10 



Mon. 
Tues. 
Mon. 

Fri. 

Fri. 



June 24 
June 27-28 


Fri. 
Mon.-Tues. 


Second Session 




July 5 
July 6 
July 11 


Tues. 
Wed. 
Mon. 



July 11 



Mon. 



July 15 


Fri. 


July 22 


Fri. 


August 8 
August 9-10 


Mon. 
Tues.-Wed 



Registration/change day. 

First day of classes. 

Last day to add a course; last day to withdraw 

of drop a course with a refund. 

Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 

below without a grade. 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 level 

without a grade. 

Last day of classes. 

Final examinations. 



Registration/change day. 
First day of classes. 

Last day to add a course; last day to withdraw 
or drop a course with a refund. 
Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School, in final form as approved by 
advisory committees, by candidates for mas- 
ter's and doctoral degrees in August, 1988. Last 
day for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tions by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 

Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 
Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 level 
without a grade. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



10 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



FALL SEMESTER, 1988 


August 26 


Fri. 


August 29 
September 5 
September 6 


Mon. 
Mon. 
Tues. 


September 12 


Mon. 


October 7 
October 14 
October 19 
October 28 


Fri. 
Fri. 

Wed. 
Fri. 


November 11 


Fri. 



November 22 


Tues. 


November 28 


Mon. 


December 9 


Fri. 


December 12-17 


Mon.-Sat. 


December 19-20 


Mon. -Tues, 



Registration/change day (late registration, 
drop/add). 

First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Last day to add a course; last day to withdraw 
or drop a course with a refund. 
Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 
Mid-semester reports due. 
Fall vacation begins at 10:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 7:50 a.m. 
Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 level 
without a grade. 

Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School, in final form as approved by 
advisory committees, by candidates for mas- 
ter's and doctoral degrees in December, 1988. 
Last day for unconditional pass on final oral 
examinations by candidates for master's de- 
grees not requiring theses. 
Thanksgiving vacation begins at 10:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 7:50 a.m. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 
Final examinations. 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1989 

January 6 Fri. 



January 9 


Mon 


March 3 


Fri. 


March 13 


Mon 


March 24 


Fri. 



March 27 


Mon. 


April 21 


Fri. 


April 24-29 


Mon.-Sat. 


May 1-2 


Mon. -Tues, 


May 6 


Sat. 



Registration/change day (late registration, 
drop/add). 

First day of classes. 
Spring vacation begins at 10:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 7:50 a.m. 
Deadline for submission of theses to the Gradu- 
ate School, in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees, by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in May, 1989. Last day 
for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tions by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 
Holiday. 

Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 
Final examinations. 
Commencement. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



11 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1989 

First Session 



May 22 


Mon. 


May 23 


Tues. 


June 23 


Fri. 


June 26-27 


Mon.-Tues. 


Second Session 




July 3 


Mon. 


July 4 


Tues. 


July 5 


Wed. 


July 10 


Mon. 



August 7 
August 8-9 



Mon. 
Tues.-Wed. 



Registration/change day. 
First day of classes. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



Registration/change day. 
Holiday. 

First day of classes. 

Deadline for submission of theses to the Gradu- 
ate School, in final form as approved by advi- 
sory committees, by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in August, 1 989. Last day 
for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tion by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



NOTE: This calendar is subject to periodic review and revision. 



12 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The Graduate School 

Graduate instruction was first offered at North Carolina State University in 
1893, and the first doctoral degree was conferred in 1926. In the ensuing years, 
the Graduate School has grown steadily and now provides instruction and facili- 
ties for advanced study and research in the fields of agriculture and life sciences, 
design, education, engineering, forest resources, humanities and social sciences, 
physical and mathematical sciences, textiles and veterinary medicine. In 1986- 
87, the University granted 182 Doctor of Philosophy degrees, 18 Doctor of Educa- 
tion degrees and 678 master's degrees. 

The Graduate School is currently composed of more than 1,500 graduate 
faculty members. Educated at major universities throughout the world and 
established both in advanced teaching and research, these scholars guide the 
University's more than 3,800 master's and doctoral students from all areas of the 
United States and some 91 other countries. 

The faculty and students have available exceptional facilities, including librar- 
ies, laboratories, modern equipment and special research areas. Additionally, a 
cooperative agreement exists among the Graduate Schools of the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 
Duke University and North Carolina State University which increases the edu- 
cational and research possibilities associated with each. 



Graduate Student Association 

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is an academic, political and social 
organization composed of all graduate students and governed by duly elected 
officials and representatives from the departmental graduate student chapters. 
It is officially recognized by the university as the voice of the graduate students. 
The GSA President has full voting membership on the Graduate School Adminis- 
trative Board and the GSA has the ability to broach responsible grievances to the 
administration on behalf of any graduate student. 

Among the services that the GSA sponsors, one of its most viable academic 
programs is the Travel Fund. Through this fund graduate students may obtain 
funds to present original research work at professional meetings. The GSA also 
sponsors, along with the Alumni Association and the Academy of Outstanding 
Teachers, an annual awards ceremony to honor those teaching assistants of 
outstanding merit. In addition, the GSA, through its standing committees, spon- 
sors various social events and provides support for departmental GSA chapters. 

Generally, the GSA can provide assistance on most questions concerning grad- 
uate student life. Graduate students may contact GSA via their departmental 
representative or via the president of the Association whose telephone number 
can be obtained through the Graduate School. All graduate students are also 
invited to participate in the business meetings which are usually held on the last 
Monday of each month. Contact departmental representatives for time and place. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 13 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Application 

Applications for admission must be accompanied by the following: two official 
transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended, references 
from at least three people who know of the student's academic record and poten- 
tial for graduate study, a non-refundable application fee of $25 and, in some 
cases, an official statement of the student's Graduate Record Examination scores. 
Application and reference forms may be obtained by writing or visiting the Dean 
of the Graduate School, 104 Peele Hall, Box 7102, North Carolina State Uni- 
versity, Raleigh, N. C. 27695-7102. When completed, all application materials 
should be returned according to instructions. Application is made for a specific 
degree program and date of enrollment (see "Admission"). 

Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Scores 

The following departments and programs will not act on applications unless 
accompanied by GRE scores for at least the GRE General (Aptitude) Test (verbal 
and quantitative): 

*Adult and Community College Education 
Agricultural Education 
Biochemistry 
Biomathematics 
Botany 

Computer Studies 
Crop Science 

Curriculum and Instruction 
Ecology 

Educational Administration and Supervision 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 
English 
Entomology 
Forestry 
**Genetics 
Guidance and Personnel Services 
History 

Horticultural Science 
Industrial Arts Education 
Industrial Engineering 
Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 
Mathematics 
Mathematics Education 
Nutrition 

Occupational Education 
Plant Pathology 

*The master's program in Adult and Community College Education requires the GRE or Miller Analogies. 
"The Genetics program requires the GRE General and Advanced Test. 



14 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Political Science 
***Psychology 

Public Affairs 

Rural Sociology 

Science Education 

Sociology 

Special Education 

Statistics 

Toxicology 

Vocational Industrial Education 

Zoology 

Many departments, although not normally requiring GRE scores, may in 
special instances require their submission as additional information to be used in 
making a judgment of the student's potential for success in a graduate program. 
Information regarding the GRE and registration forms may be obtained from 
the Educational Testing Service, Box 955, Princeton, NY 08540 or Box 1502, 
Berkeley, CA 94701. 

""Psychology requires the Subject (Advanced) Test and Miller Analogies as well. 



International Students 

Students whose native language is other than English, regardless of citizen- 
ship must submit TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) scores as 
evidence of ability to use English at a level of competence sufficient for graduate 
work. A minimum TOEFL score of 500, with section scores of no less than 45, is 
required prior to admission. (Minimum score subject to change; departments 
may establish a higher minimum requirement.) The test date must be within 24 
months of the application deadline date before the semester for which the appli- 
cation is being reviewed. An official score report issued by the Educational 
Testing Service is required. All international students must be cleared by the 
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures during the first two weeks of 
their initial semester in residence and may be required to take additional course 
work in English. In addition, the international applicant must provide the Uni- 
versity with verification that the required funds are available to support the 
proposed program of advanced study. Foreign nationals in the United States at 
the time application is made must also provide information regarding their 
current visa status. The University provides special forms to be used by the 
applicant in supplying this information. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 15 



Admission 

The procedures followed in evaluating an applicant's potential for success in 
graduate work and the criteria used for admissions decisions vary according to 
departments and schools and reflect an evaluation of the applicant's potential to 
engage in graduate work and the capability of the individual departments to 
accommodate additional students. Most departments consider applications as 
they arrive, while others accumulate applications and make recommendations on 
admission at certain times during the year. Generally, requests for admission are 
considered by departmental admissions committees which forward the depart- 
mental recommendations to the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Students are admitted to full or provisional status in a specific degree pro- 
gram. Admission is granted for a specific semester or summer term. Any change 
in the admission date must be requested in writing and approved by the depart- 
ment and Graduate School. Once the requirements for that degree program have 
been completed, no further registration as a graduate student will be permitted 
unless admission to a new graduate classification has been formally approved. 
Students with special objectives may request admission in the "Graduate-Un- 
classified Status" (see next page) or register in the "Post-Baccalaureate Studies" 
program (see next page) through the Division of Continuing Education. 

FULL GRADUATE STANDING 

To be considered for admission in full graduate standing, an applicant must 
have a baccalaureate degree from a college or university recognized as standard 
by a regional or general accrediting agency and must have at least a "B" average 
in the undergraduate major or in the latest graduate degree program. 

PROVISIONAL ADMISSION 

1. Provisional admission may be granted to applicants with bachelor's degrees 
from accredited institutions who lack undergraduate work considered essential 
for graduate study in a major field. Course work, without graduate credit, will be 
required to make up such deficiencies before admission to full status can be 
granted. 

Applicants with bachelor's degrees from nonaccredited institutions may be 
granted provisional admission when their academic records warrant this status. 
Additional course work will be required of such students when deficiencies in 
previous training are apparent. 

Full graduate standing is granted when the deficiencies responsible for the 
provisional status are corrected, provided the student has maintained a satisfac- 
tory academic record (3.0 Grade Point Average) on all course work taken in a 
graduate classification. A change from provisional status to full graduate stand- 
ing is effected only upon the recommendation of the department in which the 
student is seeking the degree. 

2. Students with bachelor's degrees from accredited institutions whose scho- 



16 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

lastic records are below the standards for admission to full graduate standing 
may be admitted provisionally when unavoidable, extenuating circumstances 
affected their undergraduate averages or when progressive improvement in 
their undergraduate work warrants provisional admission. Students admitted 
provisionally under these circumstances will have their status changed to full 
graduate standing after completion of nine or more graduate credit hours follow- 
ing admission provided the student has maintained at least a "B" average. 

A graduate student is not eligible for appointment to an assistantship or 
fellowship while on provisional status. 

GRADUATE-UNCLASSIFIED STATUS 

The Graduate-Unclassified status is a temporary classification and students 
admitted to this status are not candidates for degrees. They may take courses for 
graduate credit but may not apply more than 10 credits earned while in this 
status to any program leading to an advanced degree at this institution. Unclassi- 
fied graduate students are expected to meet the same admissions requirements 
that apply to graduate students in full standing. Any individual having an 
interest in applying for admission as a Graduate-Unclassified Student should 
correspond with the Graduate Dean describing his or her particular interests 
and objectives prior to making application. 

POST-BACCALAUREATE STUDIES (PBS) 

The Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) classification is designed for U. S. 
citizens who wish to undertake academic work beyond the baccalaureate degree 
but who are not currently admitted to a degree program. This classification is not 
open to international students with the exception of the spouse of a regularly 
enrolled NCSU student. In special cases where students are sponsored by an 
agency of the U. S. government for specialized, non-degree study, approval may 
be given by the Graduate School for registration in the Post-Baccalaureate 
Studies classification. The following policies apply to students who wish to regis- 
ter for PBS: 

1 . All must have baccalaureate degrees from accredited institutions of higher 

education. 
2. All classes taken for credit by PBS students will be graded in the usual 
manner that applies for the particular course (A.B.CD.NC or S,U). All 
courses taken at NCSU will show on the student's transcript. If the student 
is admitted as a graduate student, a maximum of nine hours may apply 
toward the minimum requirements of the degree for which the student is 
enrolled, including hours approved for graduate credit while classified as a 
senior, unclassified undergraduate or professional engineering student. 
Only the first nine hours of course work taken at the graduate level in the 
PBS category can be accepted toward degree requirements unless a 
request for some other combination of nine hours is made by the student's 
advisory committee and approved both by the College or School Dean and 
the Graduate Dean. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 17 

3. The grade point average (GPA) of a graduate student who has credits in the 
PBS category will be based on all courses taken at the 400-600 level. 
However, no course taken six (6) years prior to enrollment into a program 
will be considered in the GPA calculation. 

4. Registration is limited to a maximum of two courses per semester. Individ- 
uals who are employed full-time should limit their PBS registrations to one 
course per semester. 

5. The PBS classification carries with it no implication that the student will 
be admitted to the Graduate School in any degree classification. 

6. All course work accepted for degree credit must be approved by the stu- 
dent's advisory committee as being germane to the program. Requests for 
degree credit for courses completed in the PBS classification are con- 
sidered after admission to a graduate degree program when the student's 
Plan of Graduate Work is filed with the Graduate School. 

7. PBS students are expected to familiarize themselves with Graduate School 
policies and to seek further advice or clarification as needed. 

Grades of all courses taken after the first nine hours will be recorded on PBS 
students' transcripts. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING PROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAM 

Professional degree students are admitted as undergraduate students, are 
classified as "PR" students and are subject to rules and regulations as established 
and administered by the Dean of the College of Engineering. 

A professional degree student who is subsequently admitted to the Graduate 
School may, with the approval of the master's advisory committee, the major 
department and the Graduate School receive graduate credit for a maximum of 
nine hours credit for courses in which a grade of "B" or higher was received. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Cooperative Education Program is designed to be an integral part of a 
graduate student's educational program and is available to all majors. The 
program is designed to complement classroom learning by providing sponsored, 
paid work assignments in industry, business, and government. The work expe- 
rience is selected in terms of its relationship to a student's major and/or career 
goals and provides for full-time work on alternating semesters or part-time work 
on a parallel plan while carrying a reduced load of courses. Co-op participation 
does not constitute an interruption of college work. Co-op work assignments have 
been approved and are monitored by the program staff. 

To be eligible for the Co-op Program, graduate students must have completed 
one semester of graduate study, be in good academic standing, have the approval 
of their graduate advisers, and have an interview with the Director of Coopera- 
tive Education. For program completion, graduate students must work a min- 
imum of one fall or spring semester full-time or two semesters part-time. How- 
ever, most employers look for an increased level of productivity on the part of the 
student and, therefore, expect the graduate student to plan on additional work 
semesters. 



18 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



International students also qualify for the Co-op Program provided they meet 
visa regulations on curricular practical training. 

For further information, contact William D. Weston, Director of Cooperative 
Education, Box 7110, 737-2199. 

Certificate Renewal 

Public school personnel who are primarily interested in "certification credit" 
may enroll in the PBS program through the Division of Continuing Education 
without forwarding transcripts of previous work to the Graduate School. In such 
cases, the School of Education will be responsible for assessing the adequacy of 
the applicant's qualifications for enrollment in the course(s) concerned. 

Registration and Records 

The Office of Registration and Records must have authorization from the Dean 
of the Graduate School before a graduate student in any classification will be 
permitted to register for classes. This authorization will be sent to the Office of 
Registration and Records at the time the student is notified of acceptance for 
graduate study. All students attending classes must be registered for credit or 
audit. Grade records are furnished the students at the end of each scheduled 
school term. 

MEDICAL HISTORY AND IMMUNIZATION RECORDS 

All graduate students admitted to a degree program are required by State law 
to submit a report of medical history and immunization documentation prior to 
completing their initial registration. This report must document immunization 
against tetanus, measles, German measles and polio. NCSU students returning 
to Graduate School must have their medical history on file updated. The required 
reports should be received in the Student Health Service at least thirty days 
before registration. 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION 

North Carolina State University participates in an Interinstitutional Registra- 
tion program with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Greensboro and Duke University. Under this 
agreement, graduate students enrolled at this university may undertake course 
work on these campuses upon the recommendation of their advisory committees. 
Courses offered by North Carolina A&T University and by the University of 
North Carolina at Charlotte over the Microelectronics Center of North Carolina 
communications system are also available through Interinstitutional Registra- 
tion. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 19 



Even though taking a course on another campus, the graduate student is 
exclusively under the administrative direction of the North Carolina State Uni- 
versity Graduate School. Enrollment for courses on other campuses will take 
place on this campus, using special forms obtained from the Office of Registra- 
tion and Records. The Graduate School shall consider courses taken on other 
campuses as a part of the student's normal load, and the billing for such work will 
be through the Office of Finance and Business. The procedures followed in the 
summer sessions are somewhat different; detailed instructions are available in 
the Office of Registration and Records. 

When the grading system on the campus being visited is different from the 
North Carolina State University system, grades received under Interinstitu- 
tional Registration will be converted to the North Carolina State University 
system. "H," "P," "L" and "F" grades earned at the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill and "E," "G," "S" and T grades earned at Duke University will be 
converted to "A," "B," "C" and "NC" grades, respectively. 

COURSE LOAD 

A full-time graduate course load is 9 to 15 credits per semester (including 
audits) and 6 credits per summer session (including audits). Audits in subjects in 
which the student has no previous experience will be evaluated at full credit 
value in determining course load. Audits taken as repetition of work previously 
accomplished are considered at one half of their value in calculating course loads. 
With the single exception of foreign language audits, all audit registrations must 
fall within the range of maximum permissible course loads. 

Foreign students on F-l and J-l visas are required by the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service to carry a full-time course of study to remain in status. 

Graduate students holding assistantships are restricted to the following maxi- 
mum semester course loads: full time, 3 hours; three-quarters time, 6 hours; 
one-half time, 9 hours; one-quarter time, 12 hours. External employment obliga- 
tions of students on assistantships plus their assistantship obligations should not 
exceed these limits. Additionally, graduate assistants are limited to the following 
maximum totals of credit hours over the duration of their appointments: 



Assistantship Classification 


Length of Appointment 


Maximum Credit Hours 


Full time 


9 months 


6 


Full time 


12 months 


9 


% time 


9 months 


12 


% time 


12 months 


16 


l / 2 time 


9 months 


18 


]/ 2 time 


12 months 


24 


Vn time 


9 months 


24 


V 4 time 


12 months 


30 



20 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



SENIORS 



A member of the senior class may, with prior approval of the Dean of the 
Graduate School, register for graduate credit in courses at the 400 and 500 levels 
as long as the combined graduate and undergraduate credit load is not more than 
15 hours. Seniors with an accumulated grade point average of 3.2 or better in 
their major may enroll for a combined graduate and undergraduate credit load of 
18 hours upon the recommendation of the student's advisor and approval by the 
department and the Graduate School. No more than six hours of graduate credit 
may be accumulated by a senior, and those graduate credits may not be applied 
toward the requirements for a baccalaureate degree. Courses at the 600 level are 
not ordinarily open to undergraduates, although occasional exceptions are made 
for senior honor students. 

Seniors desiring to take courses for graduate credit should contact their major 
advisers who will forward appropriate requests to the Graduate Dean for 
approval. 

AUDITS 

Students wishing to audit courses must have the approval of their advisers and 
of the instructors teaching the courses. While auditors receive no course credit, 
they are expected to attend class regularly. The degree to which auditors must 
participate in class beyond regular attendance is optional with the instructors; 
any such requirements should be clearly explained to the auditors in writing at 
the beginning of the semester. An instructor who feels that an auditor has failed 
to fulfill the stipulated requirements is justified in marking "NR" (no recognition 
given for audit) on the grade report roll. 

GRADUATION 

There are three official graduations for graduate students per year, occurring 
at the end of the fall and spring semesters and at the end of the second summer 
session. Formal commencement exercises are held only at the end of spring 
semester, but any student who graduated the preceding second summer session 
or fall semester is eligible to participate if he or she notifies the Graduate School 
in writing of such an intent at least four weeks in advance of the actual com- 
mencement date. Conversely, any student scheduled to graduate in the spring 
semester is required to attend commencement unless he or she has notified the 
Graduate Office in writing of the desire to have the degree conferred in absentia. 

The diplomas for those students graduating at the end of second summer 
session or fall semester and those receiving permission to receive the degree in 
absentia are mailed by the Office of Registration and Records which is also 
responsible for the ordering of diplomas. 

Tuition and Fees 

A statement of tuition and fees is mailed to each preregistered student approx- 
imately five weeks before the beginning of any term. The statement must be 
returned with full payment or complete financial assistance information by the 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



21 



due date appearing on the statement. Normally the due date is approximately 
two weeks before classes begin. Non-preregistered students are required to pay 
their tuition and fees at registration. 

All students are responsible for tuition appropriate to their residence status 
unless payment is specifically provided by the terms of a fellowship, traineeship 
or assistantship. 

SEMESTER RATE SCHEDULE— 1987-88 ACADEMIC YEAR 
RESIDENTS OF NORTH CAROLINA* 



Total 
$135 
128 
191 
320 
448 



Total 
5 385 
578 
1,092 
1,671 
2,249 







Required 


Hours 


Tuition 


Fees 


0-Thesis 


$116 


$ 19 


0-2 


63 


65 


3-5 


126 


65 


6-8 


189 


131 


9+ 


252 


196 




NONRESIDENTS** 






Required 


Hours 


Tuition 


Fees 


0-Thesis 


$ 366 


$ 19 


0-2 


513 


65 


3-5 


1,027 


65 


6-8 


1,540 


131 


9+ 


2,053 


196 



SUMMER SESSION RATE SCHEDULE-1988 

RESIDENTS OF NORTH CAROLINA NONRESIDENTS 

Tuition and 

Required Fees 

$ 373 

578 

1,092 

1,605 

2,118 

SPECIAL REGISTRATION AND FEES-1987-88 ACADEMIC YEAR 

***Summer Research [GR 596S (master's candidates) or GR 696S (doctoral 
candidates)] 

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work 
during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research. 

*For definition of in-state and out-of-state rates, see pp. 23-25. 

"Under certain conditions, nonresident students who have been offered an assistantship. traineeship or fellowship may 
be eligible for reduced tuition rates. 
"'Assessed the 0-Thesis rate. 





Tuition and 


Hours 


Required Fees 


0-Thesis 


$123 


0-2 


128 


3-5 


191 


6-8 


254 


9+ 


317 



22 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



*** Examination Only [GR 597 (master's candidates)] 

For graduate students in master's programs not requiring a thesis who have 
completed all requirements except the final oral examination by the begin- 
ning of the term in which the degree is to be awarded. 

*** Thesis Preparation Only [GR 598 (master's candidates) or GR 698 (doctoral 
candidates)] 

For graduate students who have completed all course work, research and 
residence requirements and who are writing a thesis or dissertation. 

*** Dissertation Research [GR 697 (doctoral candidates)] 

For doctoral students who have scheduled no formal course work during a 
given term, who have passed the preliminary examinations, who have com- 
pleted at least six hours of departmental research on the doctoral program and 
who are devoting full time to the dissertation. Students so registered are 
full-time; the course carries no credit hour designation. 



Audits 
During semester when registered and One audit free, each additional 

paying for other course work audit same cost as for credit 

During semester when not registered 

for other course work Same cost as for credit 

During any summer session Same cost as for credit 

Full-time Faculty or Staff $ 7 

Microfilming Doctoral Dissertation $42 

Office of International Visitors 

A special administrative management fee of $250 per semester and $150 per 
summer session is required from a contracting agency sponsoring international 
students who are programmed and advised by the University's Office of Interna- 
tional Visitors. 

(ALL CHARGES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE) 

FULL-TIME FACULTY AND EMPLOYEES 

Full-time faculty of instructor rank and above and other full-time employees of 
the University who hold membership in the Teachers' and State Employees' 
Retirement System may register for credit or as auditors with free tuition 
privileges for one course in any academic term at any campus of the University of 
North Carolina. Free tuition privileges do not apply during the summer. Each 
applicant for free tuition must submit through regular channels a form provided 
by the University. 

•"Assessed the 0-Thesis rate. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 23 



REFUND OF TUITION AND FEES 

A student who officially withdraws from school during the first two weeks of a 
semester or by the end of the fourth day of a summer session will receive a tuition 
and fees refund of the full amount paid less a registration fee. The withheld fee 
amounts to $15 the first week and $25 the second week. After the two-week 
period, no refund will be made. 

In some instances, circumstances justify the waiving of rules regarding 
refunds. An example might be withdrawal because of sickness. Students have the 
privilege of appeal to the Fee Appeals Committee when they feel special consid- 
eration is merited. Applications for such appeals may be obtained from the 
University Cashier and Student Accounts Office, 2 Peele Hall. 

RESIDENCE STATUS FOR TUITION PURPOSES 

The basis for determining the appropriate tuition charge rests upon whether a 
student is a resident or a nonresident for tuition purposes. Each student must 
make a statement as to the length of his or her residence in North Carolina with 
assessment by the institution of that statement to be conditioned by the following: 

Residence — To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes, a person must become 
a legal resident and remain a legal resident for at least twelve months imme- 
diately prior to classification. Thus, there is a distinction between legal residence 
and residence for tuition purposes. Furthermore, twelve months' legal residence 
means more than simple abode in North Carolina. In particular, it means main- 
taining a domicile (permanent home of indefinite duration) as opposed to "main- 
taining a mere temporary residence or abode incident to enrollment in an institu- 
tion of higher education." The burden of establishing facts which justify 
classification of a student as a resident entitled to in-state tuition rates is on the 
applicant for each classification, who must show his or her entitlement by the 
preponderance (the greater part) of the residentiary information. 

Initiative — Being classified a resident for tuition purposes is contingent on the 
student's seeking such status and providing all information that the institution 
may require in making the determination. 

Parents' Domicile — If an individual, irrespective of age, has living parent(s) or 
court-appointed guardian of the person, the domicile of such parent(s) or 
guardian is, prima facie, the domicile of the individual; but this prima facie 
evidence of the individual's domicile may or may not be sustained by other 
information. Further, nondomiciliary status of parents is not deemed prima facie 
evidence of the applicant child's status if the applicant has lived (though not 
necessarily legally resided) in North Carolina for the five years preceding enroll- 
ment or re-registration. 

Effect of Marriage— Marriage alone does not prevent a person from becoming 
or continuing to be a resident for tuition purposes, nor does marriage in any 
circumstance insure that a person will become or continue to be a resident for 
tuition purposes. Marriage and the legal residence of one's spouse are, however, 
relevant information in determining residentiary intent. Furthermore, if both a 
husband and his wife are legal residents of North Carolina and if one of them has 
been a legal resident longer than the other, then the longer duration may be 
claimed by either spouse in meeting the twelve-month requirement for in-state 
tuition status. 



24 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Military Personnel— A North Carolinian who serves outside the State in the 
armed forces does not lose North Carolina domicile simply by reason of such 
service. Students from the military may prove retention of establishment of 
residence by reference, as in other cases, to residentiary acts accompanied by 
residentiary intent. 

In addition, a separate North Carolina statute affords tuition rate benefits to 
certain military personnel and their dependents even though not qualifying for 
the in-state tuition rate by reason of twelve months legal residence in North 
Carolina. Members of the armed services, while stationed in and concurrently 
living in North Carolina, may be charged a tuition rate lower than the out-of-state 
tuition rate to the extent that the total of entitlements for applicable tuition costs 
available from the federal government, plus certain amounts based under a 
statutory formula upon the in-state tuition rate, is a sum less than the out-of-state 
tuition rate for the pertinent enrollment. A dependent relative of a service 
member stationed in North Carolina is eligible to be charged the in-state tuition 
rate while the dependent relative is living in North Carolina with the service 
member and if the dependent relative has met any requirement of the Selective 
Service System applicable to the dependent relative. These tuition benefits may 
be enjoyed only if the applicable requirements for admission have been met; these 
benefits alone do not provide the basis for receiving those derivative benefits 
under the provisions of the residence classification statute reviewed elsewhere in 
this summary. 

Grace Period— H a person (1) has been a bona fide legal resident, (2) has 
consequently been classified a resident for tuition purposes and (3) has subse- 
quently lost North Carolina legal residence while enrolled at a public institution 
of higher education, that person may continue to enjoy the in-state tuition rate for 
a grace period of twelve months measured from the date on which North Carolina 
legal residence was lost. If the twelve months end during an academic term for 
which the person is enrolled at a State institution of higher education, the grace 
period extends, in addition, to the end of that term. The fact of marriage to one 
who continues domiciled outside North Carolina does not by itself cause loss of 
legal residence, marking the beginning of the grace period. 

Minors— Minors (persons under 18 years of age) usually have the domicile of 
their parents, but certain special cases are recognized by the residence classifica- 
tion statute in determining residence for tuition purposes. 

(a) If a minor's parents live apart, the minor's domicile is deemed to be North 
Carolina for the time period(s) that either parent, as a North Carolina legal 
resident, may claim and does claim the minor as a tax dependent, even if other 
law or judicial act assigns the minor's domicile outside North Carolina. A minor 
thus deemed to be a legal resident will not, upon achieving majority before 
enrolling at an institution of higher education, lose North Carolina legal resi- 
dence if that person (1) upon becoming an adult "acts, to the extent that the 
person's degree of actual emancipation permits, in a manner consistent with bona 
fide legal residence in North Carolina" and (2) "begins enrollment at an institu- 
tion of higher education not later than the fall academic term next following 
completion of education prerequisite to admission at such institution." 

(b) If a Minor has lived for five or more consecutive years with relatives (other 
than parents) who are domiciled in North Carolina and if the relatives have 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 25 



functioned during this time as if they were personal guardians, the minor will be 
deemed a resident for tuition purposes for an enrolled term commencing imme- 
diately after at least five years in which these circumstances have existed. If 
under this consideration a minor is deemed to be a resident for tuition purposes 
immediately prior to his or her eighteenth birthday, that person on achieving 
majority will be deemed a legal resident of North Carolina of at least 12 months' 
duration. This provision acts to confer in-state tuition status even in the face of 
other provisions of law to the contrary; however, a person deemed a resident of 12 
months' duration pursuant to this provision continues to be a legal resident of the 
State only so long as he or she does not abandon North Carolina domicile. 

Lost but Regained Domicile — If a student ceases enrollment at or graduates 
from an institution of higher education while classified a resident for tuition 
purposes and then both abandons and reacquires North Carolina domicile within 
a 12-month period, that person, if he or she continues to maintain the reacquired 
domicile into re-enrollment at an institution of higher education, may re-enroll at 
the in-state tuition rate without having to meet the usual 12-month durational 
requirement. However, any one person may receive the benefit of this provision 
only once. 

Change of Status — A student admitted to initial enrollment in an institution (or 
permitted to re-enroll following an absence from the institutional program which 
involved a formal withdrawal from enrollment) must be classified by the admit- 
ting institution either as a resident or as a non-resident for tuition purposes prior 
to actual enrollment. A residence status classification once assigned (and final- 
ized pursuant to any appeal properly taken) may be changed thereafter (with 
corresponding change in billing rates) only at intervals corresponding with the 
established primary divisions of the academic year. 

Transfer Students — When a student transfers from one North Carolina public 
institution of higher education to another, he or she is treated as a new student by 
the institution to which he or she is transferring and must be assigned an initial 
residence status classification for tuition purposes. 

Prevailing North Carolina Law — General Statute (G.S.) 116-143.1 is the pre- 
vailing statute governing residence status classification. Copies of the applicable 
law and/or implementing regulations are available for inspection in the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions, 112 Peele Hall. 

To initiate a review of a residence status classification, a student must submit a 
Residence-and-Tuition Status Application to the Graduate School office, 104 
Peele Hall. Questions about residency should be directed to that office. 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate students may receive financial support through fellowships, trainee- 
ships and teaching or research assistantships sponsored by federal, state and 
private agencies. Prospective students may request consideration for financial 
assistance by completing: the appropriate sections of the admissions application 
form. Applicants for these awards should correspond directly with the depart- 
ment of major interest concerning the availability of awards and related infor- 
mation. Enrolled students should contact the major department. Prospective and 
enrolled graduate students are encouraged to apply for national, regional and 
foundation fellowships in addition to awards sponsored through the University. 



26 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



The University offers approximately 1,600 assistantships each year. Stipend 
rates for teaching and research assistantships are competitive with other univer 
sities. For further information on the availability of assistantships, applicants 
should contact the program area of interest. 

Unless tuition is expressly provided by the terms of the award, an award 
recipient must pay tuition at the rate determined by his or her residence status. 
However, a nonresident graduate student awarded an assistantship or a fellow- 
ship may be eligible for a reduced tuition rate comparable to the in-state rate. 
Further information may be obtained by contacting the Graduate School office or 
the department of major interest. 

A graduate student must be in good academic standing (B or better average) to 
be eligible for appointment to an assistantship, fellowship or traineeship and 
must be registered in each semester in which the appointment is in effect. 

MINORITY PRESENCE GRANT PROGRAM 

Under the Board of Governors general Minority Presence Grant Program, 
black students may be eligible for special financial assistance if they are resi- 
dents of North Carolina, enrolled for at least three hours of degree-credit course 
work and demonstrate financial need. 

The Minority Presence Grant Program for Doctoral Study, Law and Veteri- 
nary Medicine provides stipends of up to $4,000 for the academic year, with an 
option of $500 in additional support for study in the summer sessions, for black 
residents of North Carolina who are selecte to participate. Recipients must be 
full-time students pursuing doctoral degrees, law degrees or degrees in veteri- 
nary medicine at East Carolina University, North Carolina State University, 
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill or The University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro. 

AMERICAN INDIAN STUDENT LEGISLATIVE GRANT PROGRAM 

The General Assembly of North Carolina has provided funds for the American 
Indian Student Legislative Grant Program for a number of grants to American 
Indian students interested in pursuing doctoral degrees at NCSU. The fellow- 
ships have a maximum value of $4,000 annually. 

To be eligible for a fellowship, interested students must be enrolled full-time 
and in good standing in a doctoral degree program, meet state residency 
requirements, have financial need and be an American Indian under the pro- 
gram's definition. This definition states that an eligible individual is one who 
maintains cultural identification as an American Indian through membership in 
an Indian tribe recognized by the State of North Carolina or by the federal 
government or through other tribal affiliation or community recognition. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 27 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP SUPPLEMENTS 

The NCSU Alumni Association each year funds Graduate Fellowship Sup- 
plements in an effort to recruit more outstanding graduate students, with the 
highly competitive award process being coordinated through the Graduate 
School office. For the 1987-88 academic year twenty Graduate Fellowship Sup- 
plements were funded; eighteen of these were awarded across campus and two 
were awarded to support the management of University Archives. These sup- 
plements are awarded on a one-time-only basis as a financial incentive above and 
beyond whatever fellowship or assistantship may be offered. 

DEPARTMENTAL FELLOWSHIPS 

Several departments offer fellowships funded from private sources. Students 
are nominated for these fellowships by their departments or programs with 
selection being made by faculty committees or by the Graduate School. For 
additional information concerning such fellowships, the applicant should contact 
the appropriate college, department or program. Examples of such fellowships 
are listed below: 

PHY Training Grant, USDA National Needs Fellowship, Biotechnology 
Fellowship and Purina Mills Research Fellowship, all through the College 
of Agriculture and Life Sciences; Dairyman Inc. Fellowship in the 
Department of Animal Science; Pioneer Hybred International in the 
Department of Crop Science; Chemical Industries Institute for Toxicology 
through the Toxicology Program; Fellowship through the Department of 
Plant Pathology; E. G. Moss and R. J. Reynolds Fellowships through the 
N. C. Agricultural Research Service in the College of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences; Harkema Fellowship in the Department of Zoology; NASA 
Traineeship, Eastman Scholarship and ARO Fellowships in the Depart- 
ment of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Nuclear Energy Fellow- 
ship, Fusion Technology Fellowship and Murray Fellowship through the 
Department of Nuclear Engineering; Dupont Manufacturing Systems Fel- 
lowship through the Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering 
Institute; Kimley-Horm Graduate Scholarship and Carolina Asphalt Asso- 
ciation, Inc., through the Department of Civil Engineering; ECE Levels I, 
II and III Supplementary Fellowships, IBM Graduate Fellowship (solid 
state-electronics), IBM Graduate Fellowship in Manufacturing Research, 
IBM Graduate Fellowship in Computer Networking and Dupont Graduate 
Fellowships through the Department of Electrical and Computer Engi- 
neering; Dupont Fellowship in Chemical Engineering, Phillips Graduate 
Fellowship, Southeastern Regional and PIA Supplemental Fellowship in 
the Department of Chemical Engineering; Dean's Fellowships, Microelec- 
tronics Center of N.C. and National Consortium for Minorities in Engineer- 
ing (GEM), all through the College of Engineering; SOHIO Fellowship in 
the Department of Physics; Gertrude M. Cox Fellowship in the Department 
of Statistics; Mary Lee and Luther Barnhardt Scholarship in the Depart- 
ment of History; Title IX Fellowship in the Department of Political Science 
and Public Administration; H. W. Close Fellowship through the College of 
Textiles. 



28 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



NATIONAL, REGIONAL AND FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIPS 

These awards are made to an individual rather than to the University. Recip- 
ients are chosen through competitions expressive of the terms of each award. 

Examples of these awards follow: 

NSF Graduate Fellowship— The Fellowship Office, National Research Coun- 
cil, 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. Pre-application packets 
are available in the Graduate School office, 104 Peele Hall. 

American Association of University Women Fellowships— Applications are 
available through local chapters. 



Other Financial Aid 

LONG-TERM LOANS 

Perkins Loans (Formerly National Direct Student Loans): Graduate students 
who are American citizens or eligible noncitizens may apply to the Financial Aid 
Office for consideration for long term, low interest loans. To qualify for loans, 
students must be making satisfactory academic progress and must show finan- 
cial need. The Financial Aid Form is the proper form to be completed for 
financial aid consideration. Other required forms — Student Data Sheet and 
Financial Aid Transcript — should be requested along with the FAF from the 
University's Financial Aid Office. Students are expected to apply for and to 
accept any available assistantships or fellowships before applying for loans. In 
the event that the funds available through the Financial Aid Office are insuffi- 
cient to meet the need of all students who apply and are eligible, priority for these 
loans will be given to students working on their first undergraduate degree and 
graduate students will be referred to other programs (see Guaranteed Student 
Loans). 

Graduate students may borrow up to $18,000 inclusive of any undergraduate 
Perkins Loans. There is no interest on the loan while the borrower is a full- or 
half-time student at an institution of higher education. Five months after ceasing 
to be at least a half-time student, if you are a new borrower, interest begins at five 
percent per year. The repayment period begins at the same time. A ten-year 
repayment period is possible for large indebtedness; however, a minimum pay- 
ment of $30 per month is required. Interest does not accrue and repayment 
installments may be postponed during any period not in excess of three years 
during which the borrower is a member of the Armed Forces of the United States 
or is a Peace Corps or Vista volunteer. Reduction of obligations to repay may 
result from teaching in schools with high concentrations of low income families or 
from teaching handicapped children. New legislation also provides that the 
Defense Department may repay a portion of your loan if you serve as an enlisted 
person in certain military occupations after receiving a Perkins Loan. 

Institutional Long-Term Loans: These loans are made from University funds. 
Institutional loans are made and are to be repaid under the same terms as the 
Perkins Loans except that there are no forgiveness features. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 29 



NOTE: Due to a lack of sufficient funds for all students, priority for Perkins 
Loans and Institutional Loans will be given to undergraduate students. 

Guaranteed Student Loan Program: This program provides loans from private 
lenders. Procedures are different in each state. Information for available loans 
may be obtained in the Financial Aid Office. Interest is at eight percent per year 
with the Federal government paying the interest during the in-school period. To 
determine eligibility for a Guaranteed Student Loan, the financial aid adminis- 
trator will add the student's Expected Family Contribution to the student's other 
financial aid. If the total financial aid is less than the cost of education the student 
is considered to have need and is eligible for a Guaranteed Student Loan. 

Graduate/professional students who are eligible may borrow under the Guar- 
anteed Student Loan program through College Foundation, Inc. or other lending 
agencies in the student's state of legal residence, a maximum of $7,500 per 
academic year or the total cost of education less other financial aid (including 
assistantships and fellowships) whichever is less. A maximum of $54,750 may be 
borrowed for graduate/professional study, including undergraduate loans. Col- 
lege Foundation Loans are insured by the North Carolina Education Assistance 
Authority or the United States Department of Education. Students from other 
states may obtain information about similar plans from the Financial Aid Office. 

PART-TIME JOBS 

The College Work Study Program is a federal program designed to provide 
part-time jobs to students who show need of financial assistance. The same 
application, the Financial Aid Form, is used to apply for both loans and jobs. 
Effort is made to assign students to jobs in keeping with their special interests 
and skills. As is the case with campus-administered loans, priority for these funds 
is given to undergraduate students pursuing their first undergraduate degree. 

Other jobs not based on need are listed at the Financial Aid Office and are open 
to all students. 

SHORT-TERM EMERGENCY LOANS 

Loans, usually in amounts of $100 or less, to meet emergency expenses may be 
obtained on short notice at the Financial Aid Office. These loans, in that they are 
designed for short term, emergency use, must be repaid within about 30 days. A 
loan may not be taken out between semesters or summer sessions. 



Military Education and Training 

The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) selects interested University 
students for enrollment in Army ROTC (AROTC) or in Air Force ROTC 
(AFROTC) for officer education and training leading toward a commission. 

The Army and Air Force ROTC departments educate and train University 
students, graduate and undergraduate, for a commission in their respective 



30 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



military services. These students must have four full semesters (undergraduate 
or graduate) remaining at the time they enter the ROTC Program (exceptions for 
Army ROTC are noted below). Uniforms and books for ROTC are provided. 
Transfer credit is allowed for previous ROTC course work at other institutions. 
Graduate students who will be at NCSU for at least two years may, upon 
successful completion of a six-weeks' summer training period, be enrolled in the 
Air Force ROTC Program. Entry requirements for either program may also be 
met by having met any one of the following requirements: 

1. Completed basic level ROTC courses as an undergraduate. 

2. Be an honorably discharged veteran. 

3. Have completed military basic training and be a member of an Army/Air 
Force Reserve or National Guard Unit. 

4. Successfully complete a two-weeks, on-campus program (Army ROTC 
only). 

Air Force ROTC offers a Flight Screening Program for selected cadets which 
is conducted by an Air Force flying school in Texas during the summer at no 
expense to the student. Students successfully completing ROTC flight screening 
may be selected for further flight training as an Air Force pilot. 

Graduate students enrolled in the junior and senior years of ROTC receive $100 
per month. Scholarships which pay all tuition, fees and costs of required text- 
books in addition to the $100 per month are available on a competitive basis. 

Special provisions for veterans are made in Army ROTC whereby they are 
granted placement credit for their prior service experience and training. Addi- 
tionally, Army ROTC offers the student several points of entry into the ROTC 
Program, under a process of granting ROTC placement credit for college courses 
or other worthwhile experiences that contribute to the requisite skills of a second 
lieutenant. Army ROTC counselors are available to evaluate the students' prior 
learning experiences and advise them as to where they can be placed in ROTC. 
Under the Army's Simultaneous Membership Program, the graduate student 
may participate in the Army Reserve or National Guard and receive approxi- 
mately $84 per month in addition to the $100 monthly stipend. The National 
Guard provides up to $500 tuition costs per year for its members. The student 
must enlist in the specified component and have completed basic training prior to 
entry into the program. 

Additional information on Army ROTC may be obtained from the Professor of 
Military Science, Room 154, Reynolds Coliseum (737-2428) and Air Force ROTC 
from the Professor of Aerospace Studies, Room 145, Reynolds Coliseum 
(737-2417). 

Health Services 

The Student Health Service, located in Clark Hall Infirmary, offers health 
care to students in a campus facility staffed by eight full-time physicians, three 
Family Nurse Practitioners, a pharmacist, laboratory technicians, registered 
nurses, health educators and support staff. 

During fall and spring semester, the Health Service is open 24 hours a day, 
seven days a week except during holidays and breaks. Physicians maintain 
regular office hours Monday through Friday and are on call at other times. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 31 

(Students must check-in by 4:30 p.m. to see a physician.) A limited-hours out- 
patient clinic is in operation during summer sessions and semester breaks. 

All currently enrolled students are eligible for medical care. The pre-paid 
health fee covers professional services such as nurse and M.D. visits, laboratory 
tests, cold medications and health education. There is a nominal charge for 
x-rays, prescriptions and specialty clinics. Students are responsible for all ser- 
vices received off-campus, e.g., M.D. or hospital. 

The University offers students the opportunity to enroll in a student group 
health and accident insurance plan which helps cover the cost of referrals to 
off-campus specialists or to hospitals for serious illnesses. 

International students are required to enroll in a student health insurance 
program. 

For additional information, telephone 737-2563. 

Housing 

ON-CAMPUS HOUSING 

The University operates 19 residence halls for single students with a total 
capacity to accommodate approximately 6,300 students. Eight of the halls are 
arranged in suites of four or five rooms with a common bathroom. Ten others 
have rooms which open onto a central corridor with bathrooms at separate 
intervals. North Hall has private baths in each double room. 

Rooms are provided with basic furnishings such as bed, chest of drawers, desk, 
chair and waste basket for each double or single room occupant. An optional linen 
rental service is available through the University Laundry and Dry Cleaning 
Service. 

The 1987-88 rental fee for a main campus residence hall double room is $610 
per semester per student and may increase in future years. Room rents in North 
Hall and South Hall are higher. With the exception of Watauga Hall (graduate 
and upper class residence hall), new freshmen and continuing residents have 
priority for a room assignment over new graduate students. Students who are 
unable to secure on-campus housing before school begins may contact the Hous- 
ing Assignments Office, 201 Harris Hall, on or after September concerning the 
availability of housing on campus at that time. 

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING 

The Housing Assignments Office also maintains a self-help facility which 
makes available listings of off-campus housing accommodations sent to them by 
private landlords; however, specific arrangements for this housing must be 
contracted for by those individuals concerned. The listings are not mailed as they 
change frequently and most landlords and tenants prefer to complete the rental 
transaction in person rather than by telephone or mail. The Housing Assign- 
ments Office is open from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday only. 



32 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



STUDENT FAMILY HOUSING 

The University also maintains 300 apartments for student families, including 
efficiency, one-bedroom and two-bedroom units. The monthly rental rates for the 
1987-88 year are $210 (includes gas) for efficiencies, $202 for one-bedroom 
apartments and $224 for the two-bedroom units. All apartments have built-in 
dresser drawers, closets, a stove and a refrigerator. Interested students should 
write to E. S. King Village, P Building, North Carolina State University, 
Raleigh, NC 27607 for family housing applications and information or telephone 
(919) 737-2430. 

Additional Information 

If additional information is needed, contact the Graduate School, 104 Peele 
Hall, P. O. Box 7102, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C. 27695-7102 
(telephone 919/737-2871). 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 33 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

The Graduate School offers programs of study leading to the master's degree in 
75 fields and the doctorate in 48. Each student's program is planned with an 
advisory committee of graduate faculty members to provide the opportunity for 
gaining advanced knowledge in the particular field of study. Graduate education 
is the final stage in the development of intellectual independence. It is different 
from undergraduate education in that the student is encouraged to establish 
premises, to hypothesize and to defend both the procedure and the conclusions of 
independent investigation. The burden of proof for the verif iability of knowledge 
rests on the student, not on the faculty member. Emphasis is placed upon the 
student's scholarly development through formal course work, seminars, research 
and independent investigation. 

Graduate students are expected to familiarize themselves with the require- 
ments for the degrees for which they are candidates and are held responsible for 
the fulfillment of these requirements. 
The Graduate School offers courses of study in the following fields: 
Aerospace Engineering — M.S., Ph.D. 
Agriculture — Master of 
Agricultural Economics — M.S. 
Animal Science— M.S., Ph.D. 
Applied Mathematics— M.S., Ph.D. 
Architecture— Master of 
Archival Management— M. A. 
Biochemistry— M.S., Ph.D. 
Biomathematics— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Botany-M.S., Ph.D. 

Chemical Engineering— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Chemistry— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Civil Engineering — Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Computer Studies — Master of, M.S. 
Crop Science— M.S., Ph.D. 
Ecology— M.S. 
Economics — Master of, Ph.D. 

Education — (Master of Education offered in fields listed below) 
Adult and Community College Education— M.S., Ed.D. 
Agricultural Education— M.S. 
Curriculum and Instruction — M.S., Ed.D. 
Educational Administration and Supervision— M.S., Ed.D. 
Guidance and Personnel Services— M.S., Ed.D. 
Industrial Arts Education— M.S., Ed.D. 
Mathematics Education— M.S., Ph.D. 
Middle Grades Education— M.S. 
Occupational Education— M.S., Ed.D. 
Science Education — M.S., Ph.D. 
Special Education — M.S. 
Vocational Industrial Education — M.S. 



34 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Electrical and Computer Engineering— Master of. M.S., Ph.D. 
*Engineering— Master of 
English— M.A. 
Entomology— M.S.. Ph.D. 
Fiber and Polymer Science— Ph.D. 
Food Science— M.S., Ph.D. 
Forestry— Master of. M.S., Ph.D. 
Genetics— M.S., Ph.D. 
History— M.A. 

Horticultural Science— M.S., Ph.D. 
Industrial Engineering— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering — Master of 
Landscape Architecture— Master of 
Life Sciences— Master of 
Management— M.S. 

Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences — M.S., Ph.D. 
Materials Science and Engineering — M.S., Ph.D. 
Mathematics— M.S., Ph.D. 

Mechanical Engineering— Master of, M.S.. Ph.D. 
Microbiology— M.S., Ph.D. 
Nuclear Engineering — Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Nutrition— M.S., Ph.D. 
Operations Research— M.S., Ph.D. 
Physics— M.S., Ph.D. 
Physiology— M.S.. Ph.D. 
Plant Pathology— M.S., Ph.D. 
Political Science — M.A. 
Poultry Science— M.S. 
Product Design — Master of 
Psychology— M.S., Ph.D. 
Public Affairs— Master of 

Recreation Resources Administration — Master of, M.S. 
Rural Sociology— M.S. 
Sociology — Master of, Ph.D. 
Soil Science-M.S., Ph.D. 
Statistics— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Technology for International Development — Master of 
Textile Chemistry— M.S. 
Textile Engineering and Science — M.S. 
Textile Management and Technology — M.S. 
Toxicology— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
**Urban Design— Master of 
Veterinary Medical Sciences — M.S., Ph.D. 
Wildlife Biology— Master of, M.S. 
Wood and Paper Science — Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Zoology— M.S., Ph.D. 

*Off -campus only. 

applications are being accepted. Students interested in this area should contact the School of Design. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 35 



Master's Degrees 

The Graduate School offers programs of study leading to the Master of Science 
degree, the Master of Arts degree and the Master's degree in certain designated 
fields. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE AND MASTER OF ARTS 

For all Master of Science and Master of Arts degrees, the programs are 
planned with the objective of making possible a reasonable, comprehensive 
mastery of the subject matter in the chosen field. Training and experience in 
research are provided to familiarize the student with the methods, ideals and 
goals of independent investigation. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND PLAN OF GRADUATE WORK 

The advisory committee is composed of at least three members of the Graduate 
Faculty, one of whom is designated as the chair and one of whom represents the 
supporting area. This committee is appointed by the Graduate Dean upon the 
recommendation of the head of the major department. 

The student's program of study is planned so as to provide a comprehensive 
view of the major field of interest and to provide training in research in this field 
and related areas of knowledge. As great a latitude is permitted in the selection of 
courses as is compatible with a well-defined major and supporting courses. In 
general, it is expected that approximately two-thirds of the course work will be in 
the major and one-third in supporting courses. Since there are many possible 
combinations of course work, a specific Plan of Graduate Work is developed by 
the advisory committee with the student. The program of course work to be 
followed by the student and the thesis problem selected must be approved by the 
student's advisory committee, the head of the department and the Graduate 
School. The Plan of Graduate Work should be submitted to the Graduate School 
for approval prior to completion of one-half of the program. 

CO-MAJOR 

Students may co-major at the master's level with the approval of both depart- 
ments and appropriate representation on the advisory committee. Co-majors 
must meet all requirements for majors in both departments. One degree is 
awarded and the co-major is noted on the transcript. A co-major must involve 
degree programs with similar requirements. Co-majors are not permitted 
between thesis and non-thesis degree programs or between Doctor of Philosophy 
and Doctor of Education degree programs. Enrolled co-majors will be classified 
in only one program for record purposes. 

RESIDENCE 

Students engaged in a course of study leading to the Master of Science or 
Master of Arts degree are required to be in residence, pursuing graduate work, 
for a minimum of one full academic year or its equivalent. 



36 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CREDITS 

A minimum of 30 semester credits is required for the Master of Science or 
Master of Arts; however, the number of credit hours included in a Plan of 
Graduate Work often exceeds this minimum. At least 20 semester hours must 
come from 500- and 600-level courses, with no fewer than six credits being at the 
600-level. The program may include no more than six hours of research and no 
more than two hours of departmental seminar, unless the total program exceeds 
30 hours. Courses at the 400-level counted toward the minimal 30-hour require- 
ment may not come from the major field. 

CREDIT FROM OUTSIDE SOURCES 

Transfer Credit. No more than six of the required academic credits will be 
accepted from other institutions. A graduate course may be considered for 
transfer to a master's program provided it has been completed in a graduate or 
post-baccalaureate classification at an accredited graduate school with a grade of 
"B" or better. Transfer credit may not be used to fill the 20-hour 500- and 
600-level course requirement in master's programs. 

Transfer of Undergraduate Credit. No graduate credit will be allowed for 
excess credits completed in an undergraduate classification at another insti- 
tution. 

Correspondence Courses and Extension Courses. No graduate credit will 
be allowed for correspondence courses or for courses completed by extension at 
universities other than NCSU. 

Credit by Extension. A maximum of six semester credits taken prior to 
admission to a graduate program and earned through NCSU extension study 
may be applied toward degree requirements provided the courses are graduate 
level and are taught by members of the NCSU Graduate Faculty. If a student has 
been admitted to the Graduate School and an approved Plan of Graduate Work 
has been submitted, six additional semester credits may be obtained in off- 
campus NCSU graduate courses to apply toward the minimal credit hour 
requirement for the degree. Credit accepted by extension reduces the amount of 
credit which may be transferred from other institutions. 

GRADING AND ACADEMIC STANDING 

Performance in lecture courses is evaluated as "A" (Excellent), 
"B" (Good), "C" (Passing), "D" or "NC" (No credit). In order to receive graduate 
degree credit, a grade of "C" or higher is required. All grades on courses taken for 
graduate credit as an undergraduate at NCSU and all grades on courses taken in 
a graduate classification at NCSU in courses numbered 400 and above are 
included in the graduate grade point average. Courses at the 300 level and below 
are not considered for graduate credit and grades earned on them do not enter the 
grade point average. 

Performance in research, seminar and special problems courses is evaluated as 
either "S" (Satisfactory) or "U" (Unsatisfactory), and these grades are not used in 
computing the grade point average. However, a student who receives a "U" on 
any course will not receive credit for that course and may be required to repeat it. 

The "Master Listing of Approved Graduate Courses" identifies the approved 
grading (A,B,C,D,NC or S,U) for each 500- and 600-level course. Generally, 
courses numbered through the 590 series and the 690 series will receive "S" or 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 37 

"U" grading. Other course numbers will carry A,B,C,D,NC grading. Any devia- 
tion from the approved grading for a particular course must be requested by the 
department and approved by the Academic School Dean and the Graduate Dean 
prior to teaching the course. Also included in the GPA calculation and the 
determination of academic standing are all 400-600-level credits earned by a 
student in a PBS classification at NCSU within six years of the date of enrollment 
as a graduate student. (See the Post-baccalaureate Studies section for restric- 
tions concerning Post-baccalaureate Studies courses.) 

The grade of "IN" (Incomplete) may be given in any course at the discretion of 
the instructor. A student who receives an "IN" must complete the unfinished 
work to have the Incomplete converted to a final grade by the end of the next 
semester in which the student is enrolled provided that this period is not longer 
than 12 months from the end of the semester or summer session in which the 
Incomplete was received; otherwise, the "IN" will be automatically converted to 
"NC" or "U," in accord with the grading approved for the particular course. All 
grades of "IN" must be cleared prior to graduation. 

Except in the case of Interinstitutional Registration (see p. 18), grades on 
courses transferred from another institution will not be included in computing 
the grade point average. 

Graduate students are given a notice of academic warning if they have accumu- 
lated less than nine hours at the 400-level or above and have less than a 3.0 ("B" 
average). Graduate students are placed on academic probation if they accumu- 
late nine or more but less than eighteen credit hours at the 400-level or above and 
have a grade point average of less than 3.0 ("B" average). A student's graduate 
study is terminated if eighteen or more credit hours at the 400-level or above are 
accumulated with a grade point average of less than 3.0 ("B" average). In the case 
of program termination, no further registration in a graduate classification will 
be permitted. Under extenuating circumstances the student will be reinstated 
upon the written recommendation of the department and approval by the Gradu- 
ate Dean. (Effective Fall 1978 for all graduate students.) Departments have the 
prerogative of recommending the termination of a student's graduate admission 
at any time. 

Students who are eligible to attend the first summer session are eligible to 
attend either or both summer sessions. For example, students who receive a 
notice of "Graduate Admission Terminated" at the end of the first summer 
session may register for the second summer session unless the major department 
recommends otherwise. 

A graduate student must be in good academic standing (B or better average) to 
be eligible for appointment to an assistantship, fellowship or traineeship and 
must be registered in each semester in which the appointment is in effect. 

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS 

A reading knowledge of one modern foreign language (Germanic, Romance or 
Slavic) is required of students pursuing the Master of Arts in English and of 
students engaged in the Master of Science programs in chemistry and mathemat- 
ics. In the Master of Arts program in political science, competence in a foreign 
language or in research methodology is required. The Departments of Entomol- 
ogy, History and Mathematics and Science Education leave the decision to the 
student's advisory committee. 



38 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Proficiency can be demonstrated in one of two ways: 

1. By passing a traditional reading knowledge examination, which can be 
requested by the student at any time. 

2. By passing the final examination in a course especially designed for gradu- 
ate students who have no previous knowledge of a foreign language or who 
wish to refresh their knowledge of a language. The Department of Foreign 
Languages and Literatures offers such courses, normally in the fall, for each 
of the three major foreign languages: French (FLF 401), German (FLG 401) 
and Spanish (FLS 401). These courses concentrate exclusively on teaching 
students to understand the written word and do not provide instruction or 
testing in speaking and original composition. Failure to pass the course 
carries with it no penalty other than the fact that the student's language 
requirement will remain unfulfilled. These courses are neither counted for 
credit nor used in computing the grade point average. 

THESIS 

Theses prepared by candidates for the Master of Science or Master of Arts 
degree must represent an original investigation into a subject which has been 
approved by the student's advisory committee and the head of the major depart- 
ment. Three copies of the thesis in final form as approved by the advisory 
committee, each signed by the members of the advisory committee, must be 
submitted to the Graduate School by a specific deadline in the semester or 
summer session in which the degree is to be conferred. Detailed information on 
form and organization of the thesis is presented in the University's Guide for the 
Preparation of Theses, which is available in the Graduate School office. 

COMPREHENSIVE WRITTEN EXAMINATIONS 

Written examinations covering the subject matter of the major and supporting 
fields may be required of the candidate. When required, such examinations must 
be successfully completed prior to requesting the comprehensive oral examina- 
tion. Information concerning written examination schedules should be obtained 
from the student's major department. 

COMPREHENSIVE ORAL EXAMINATIONS 

A candidate for the Master of Science or Master of Arts degree must pass a 
comprehensive oral examination to demonstrate to the advisory committee that 
he or she possesses a reasonable mastery of the subject matter of the major and 
supporting fields and that this knowledge can be used with promptness and 
accuracy. This examination may not be held until all other requirements, except 
completion of the course work in current registration during the final semester, 
are satisfied. Application for the examination must be filed with the Dean of the 
Graduate School by the chair of the advisory committee at least two weeks prior 
to the date on which the examination is to be held and must be accompanied by 
certification that the thesis is complete except for such revisions which may be 
necessary as a result of the final examination. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 39 

A unanimous vote of approval by the advisory committee is required for 
passing the oral examination. Approval of the examination may be conditioned, 
however, upon the completion of additional work to the satisfaction of the advi- 
sory committee. A formal reexamination will not be required in this case. Failure 
of a student to pass the oral examination terminates the student's graduate work 
at this institution unless otherwise unanimously recommended by the advisory 
committee. Only one reexamination will be permitted. All committee actions 
may be appealed by written application to the Graduate Dean. 

Oral examinations for master's degree candidates are open to the graduate 
faculty by right and to the University community by unanimous consent of the 
advisory committee and the student being examined. Discussions and decisions 
regarding the student's performance are private to the advisory committee. 

TIME LIMIT 

All requirements for the master's degree must be completed within six 
calendar years, beginning with the date the student commences courses carrying 
graduate credit applicable to the degree program, unless a more restrictive time 
limit has been established by the academic school. 

MASTER'S DEGREE IN A DESIGNATED FIELD 

The University offers a number of master's degree programs in designated 
fields. These programs vary in requirements and persons having an interest in 
these programs are advised to contact the major department for further informa- 
tion including specific prerequisites and degree requirements. General Gradu- 
ate School policies as stated on page 35 through 39 apply to these degree pro- 
grams with the exception of references to the master's thesis. 

MASTER OF AGRICULTURE DEGREE AND 
MASTER OF LIFE SCIENCES DEGREE 

The requirements for either of these degrees are as follows: 

1. A total of 36 semester hours is required. 

2. A minimum of four semester hours in special problems is required; not 
more than six semester hours in special problems will be allowed. This work 
replaces the research thesis requirement for the Master of Science or Mas- 
ter of Arts degrees. 

3. A minimum of 20 credit hours of 500- or 600-level course work is required. 
There are no specific requirements as to courses in the 600-level group. 

4. A reading knowledge of a modern foreign language is not required. 

In all other respects, the requirements for the Master of Agriculture or the 
Master of Life Sciences degree are the same as those for the Master of Science and 
Master of Arts degrees. 



40 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Summary of Procedures for Master's Degrees 

1. Letter of inquiry from prospective student to Graduate School or depart- 
ment head. 

2. Mailing of proper forms to student. 

3. Receipt of application materials and required fee. 

4. Review of application materials by department or program. 

5. Department forwards recommendation regarding applicant's admissibil- 
ity to Graduate Dean. 

6. The department's recommendation is reviewed and the student is notified of 
the action taken on the request for admission. 

7. Student arrives, reports to the department, is assigned an adviser and 
makes out a roster of courses in consultation with the departmental adviser. 

8. Advisory committee of three or more graduate faculty members, one of 
whom is designated as the chair and one of whom represents the supporting 
field, appointed by the Graduate Dean upon the recommendation of the 
department head. 

9. Plan of Work prepared by the advisory committee with the student and 
submitted in quadruplicate to the department head and the Graduate 
School for approval prior to completion of one-half of the proposed program. 

10. Three copies of the approved Plan of Work returned to the department. One 
copy is kept in department files, one is returned to the committee chair and 
one is given to the student. 

11. Student passes language examination (if required by the major depart- 
ment). 

12. Written examination in the major and/or supporting fields may be required 
of the candidate. If required, written examinations must be successfully 
completed prior to requesting the comprehensive oral examination. 

13. A copy of a preliminary draft of the thesis is submitted to the chair of the 
student's advisory committee for review. (Thesis degrees only). 

14. The diploma order request form must be filed with the Graduate School by 
the end of the third week of the semester or summer session of anticipated 
graduation. Failure to submit the form by this date may result in the 
student's not receiving the diploma at graduation. 

15. At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, the chair of the 
student's advisory committee submits the thesis to advisory committee 
members for review. (Thesis degrees only). 

16. The final oral examination may be scheduled when all other requirements, 
except completion of the course work for the final semester, are satisfied. 
Permission for the candidate to take the final oral examination is requested 
of the Graduate School at least two weeks before the examination and, in the 
case of thesis degrees, must be accompanied by a certification that the thesis 
is complete except for such revisions as may be necessary as a result of the 
final examination. Specific deadline dates for non-thesis master's candi- 
dates appear in The Calendar. 

17. The Graduate Dean schedules the examination and notifies the student and 
advisory committee of the time and place. The report on the final examina- 
tion should be filed with the Graduate School as soon as the examination has 
been completed. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 41 



18. Three copies of the thesis signed by each member of the student's advisory 
committee must be submitted to the Graduate School by a specific deadline 
in the semester or summer session in which the degree is to be conferred. 
Specific deadline dates appear in The Calendar. 

19. The thesis is reviewed by the Graduate School to insure that the format 
conforms with the specifications prescribed in the Guide for the Preparation 
of Theses. (Thesis degrees only). 

20. All course work scheduled in a graduate degree classification must be 
completed prior to graduation. 

21. A grade point average of at least 3.0 is required for graduation. 

22. All degree requirements must be completed within six calendar years, 
beginning with the date the student commences courses carrying graduate 
credit applicable to the degree program, unless a more restrictive time limit 
has been established by the academic school. 

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education Degrees 

The doctorate symbolizes the ability of the recipient to undertake original 
research and scholarly work at the highest levels without supervision. The degree 
is therefore not granted simply upon completion of a stated amount of course 
work but rather upon demonstration by the student of a comprehensive knowl- 
edge and high attainment in scholarship in a specialized field of study. The 
student must demonstrate this ability by writing a dissertation reporting the 
results of an original investigation and by passing a series of comprehensive 
examinations in the field of specialization and related areas of knowledge. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND PLAN OF GRADUATE WORK 

An advisory committee of at least four graduate faculty members, one of whom 
will be designated as chair, will be appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School 
upon the recommendation of the head of the major department. The committee, 
which must include at least one representative of the minor field, will, with the 
student, prepare a Plan of Graduate Work which must be approved by the 
department head and the Graduate School. In addition to the course work to be 
undertaken, the subject of the student's dissertation must appear on the plan; and 
any subsequent changes in subject or in the overall plan must be submitted for 
approval. 

The program of work must be unified, and all constituent parts must contrib- 
ute to an organized program of study and research. Courses must be selected 
from groups embracing one principal subject of concentration, the major, and 
from a cognate field, the minor. Normally, a student will select the minor work 
from a single discipline or field which, in the judgment of the advisory commit- 
tee, provides relevant support to the major field. However, when the advisory 
committee finds that the needs of the student will best be served by work in an 
interdisciplinary minor, it has the alternative of developing a special program in 
lieu of the usual minor. 



42 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



CO-MAJOR 

Students may co-major at the doctoral level with the approval of both depart- 
ments and appropriate representation on the advisory committee. Co-majors 
must meet all requirements for majors in both departments. One degree is 
awarded and the co-major is noted on the transcript. A co-major must involve 
degree programs with similar requirements. Co-majors are not permitted 
between thesis and non-thesis degree programs or between Doctor of Philosophy 
and Doctor of Education degree programs. Enrolled co-majors will be classified 
in only one program for record purposes. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

For the Doctor of Philosophy and the Doctor of Education degrees, the student 
is expected to be registered for graduate work at an accredited graduate school 
for at least six semesters beyond the baccalaureate degree. 

The basic University residence requirements are defined below. However, 
academic schools have the prerogative of establishing more restrictive require- 
ments within the respective schools. (The College of Education requires a min- 
imum of one academic year of full-time resident study). 

At least two residence credits, as defined below, must be secured in continuous 
residence (registration in consecutive semesters) as a graduate student at the 
University. Failure to take work during the summer does not break continuity; 
however, summer work may be used in partial fulfillment of this requirement. 

Residence credit is determined by the number of semester hours of graduate 
work carried during a given term. During a regular semester, residence credit is 
calculated in the following manner: 

Semester Credits (Hours) Residence Credits 
9 or more 1 

6-8 2/3 

less than 6 (including registration 1/3 

for "Thesis Preparation") 

The residence credit for a six-week summer term is equal to one-half of the 
corresponding amount for a regular semester. For example, six semester hours 
carried during a summer session will earn one-third of a residence credit; less 
than six credit hours will earn one-sixth of a residence credit. 



GRADING AND ACADEMIC STANDING 

The grading system and grade requirements for all doctoral programs are the 
same as those for master's degree programs, as described on pages 36-37. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 43 



LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS 

A reading knowledge of at least one modern foreign language is required by 
some departments for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Doctoral students should 
contact the major department for specific language requirements. For the Doc- 
tor of Education degree, the decision as to whether or not there will be a language 
requirement is left to the student's advisory committee. 

Students who choose to demonstrate a reading knowledge of a language may 
select from any of the Romance, Germanic or Slavic languages (or any combina- 
tion in those programs requiring two languages). The Department of Foreign 
Languages and Literatures offers courses in French, German and Spanish espe- 
cially designed for graduate students who have no previous knowledge of a 
foreign language or who wish to refresh their knowledge of a language. These 
courses concentrate exclusively on teaching students to understand the written 
word and do not provide instruction or testing in speaking and original composi- 
tion. A passing grade on the final examination in one of these courses is sufficient 
evidence of a reading knowledge of the language. 

To demonstrate comprehension in depth of one language, a student must not 
only prove that one possesses a reading knowledge of the language but also that he 
or she is proficient in the oral and compositional elements of that language. 
Students desiring to master one language in depth should consult the head of the 
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures concerning the specific 
courses which will be necessary to achieve this comprehension; specific arran- 
gements will depend upon the student's background in the language. 

Students whose native language is other than English may use English as one 
of the languages when two are required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. 
When English is submitted in partial fulfillment of the dual language require- 
ment, the native language may not be used as the other language. 

When only one language is required in the student's program, certification for 
that language must occur on this campus. 



PRELIMINARY COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS 

After completing the language requirement but not earlier than the end of the 
second year of graduate study and not later than one semester (four months) 
before the final oral examination, each doctoral student is required to take the 
preliminary comprehensive examinations. The examinations consist of two 
parts: written examinations and an oral examination. Requirements for written 
examinations in the minor field are left to the discretion of the department in 
which the student is minoring. 

The written portion may be conducted in one of two ways. In the first, each 
member of the advisory committee prepares a set of questions for the student's 
response, and answers to each set are returned to the appropriate member for 
grading. This procedure is used by departments which have a relatively small 
number of doctoral students. 



44 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



used and the conclusions reached in the research, as reported in the dissertation. 
It is conducted by an examining committee, which consists of the student's 
advisory committee and a Graduate School representative. This examination is 
open to the University community. 

A unanimous vote of approval of the advisory committee is required for passing 
the final oral examination. Approval may be conditioned, however, on the stu- 
dent's meeting specific requirements prescribed by the student's advisory com- 
mittee. Failure of a student to pass the examination terminates one's work at this 
institution unless the advisory committee recommends a reexamination. No 
reexamination may be given until one full semester has elapsed and only one 
reexamination is permitted. 

Many of the larger departments have developed departmental written exami- 
nations to be used for all students. These examinations are given several times 
during the year, and scheduled dates are announced well in advance. Where 
written departmental examinations of this kind are used, the student will be 
expected to make arrangements to schedule these examinations. 

Regardless of the method employed, the questions involved may cover any 
phase of the course work taken by the student during graduate study or any 
subject logically related to an understanding of the subject matter in the major 
and minor areas of study. The questions are designed to measure the student's 
mastery of the subject matter and the adequacy of preparation for research. 
Failure to pass the written preliminary examinations terminates the student's 
work at this institution, subject to departmental and/or school policies with 
respect to reexamination. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the written portion of the preliminary exami- 
nations and after completion of all course work relevant to the examination, 
authorization for the preliminary oral examination is requested from the Gradu- 
ate School. This examination is conducted by the student's advisory committee 
and a representative from the Graduate School and is open to all graduate faculty 
members. The student and the examining committee will be notified by the 
Graduate School of the arranged time and place. The oral examination is 
designed to test the student's ability to relate factual knowledge to specific 
circumstances, to use this knowledge with accuracy and promptness and to 
demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the field of specialization and 
related areas. 

A unanimous vote of approval by the members of the advisory committee is 
required for the student to pass the preliminary oral examination. Approval may 
be conditioned, however, on the successful completion of additional work in some 
particular field(s). All committee actions may be appealed by written application 
to the Graduate Dean. 

Failure to pass the preliminary oral examination terminates the student's 
work at this institution unless the examining committee recommends a reexami- 
nation. No reexamination may be given until at least one full semester has 
elapsed, and only one reexamination is permitted. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 45 



CANDIDACY 



A doctoral student is admitted to candidacy upon passing the preliminary 
examinations without conditions or after fulfilling any conditions specified by 
the advisory committee. 

FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION 

The final oral examination is scheduled after the dissertation is complete 
except for such revisions as may be necessary as a result of the examination, but 
not earlier than one semester or its equivalent after admission to candidacy and 
not before all required course work has been completed or is currently in pro- 
gress. The examination consists of the candidate's defense of the methodology 

THE DISSERTATION 

The doctoral dissertation presents the results of the student's original investi- 
gation in the field of major interest. It must represent a contribution to knowl- 
edge, be adequately supported by data and be written in a manner consistent 
with the highest standards of scholarship. Publication is expected. 

The dissertation will be reviewed by all members of the advisory committee 
and must receive their approval prior to submission to the Graduate School. 
Three copies of the document signed by all members of the student's advisory 
committee must be submitted to the Graduate School by a specific deadline in the 
semester or summer session in which the degree is to be conferred. Prior to final 
approval, the dissertation will be reviewed by the Graduate School to insure that 
the format conforms to the specifications prescribed in the Guide for the Prepara- 
tion of Theses. Detailed information on form and organization of- the dissertation 
is presented in the University's Guide for the Preparation of Theses which is 
available in the Graduate School office. 

The University has a requirement that all doctoral dissertations be micro- 
filmed by University Microfilms International, of Ann Arbor, Michigan, which 
includes publication of the abstract in Dissertation Abstracts International. The 
student is required to pay for the microfilming service. (See "Special Registra- 
tion and Fees" under "Tuition and Fees.") 

TIME LIMIT 

Doctoral students are allowed a maximum of six calendar years from admis- 
sion to the doctoral program to attain candidacy for the degree and a maximum of 
ten calendar years to complete all degree requirements. Academic schools or 
departments may have more restrictive requirements than the above stated 
Univerity policy. All students admitted to doctoral programs effective Fall 1979 
are subject to the above policy. Time limits for students admitted to doctoral 
programs prior to Fall 1979 but who were not admitted to candidacy as of Fall 
1979 and who do not meet the above policy will be considered on an individual 
basis. Doctoral students admitted to candidacy prior to the 1979 fall semester are 
subject to the previous policy which allowed seven calendar years from admission 
to candidacy to completion of all degree requirements. 



46 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Summary of Procedures for the Doctor of Philosophy 
and Doctor of Education Degrees 

1. Letter of inquiry from prospective student to Graduate School or depart- 
ment head. 

2. Mailing of proper forms to student. 

3. Receipt of application materials and required fee. 

4. Review of application materials by department or program. 

5. Department forwards recommendation regarding applicant's admissibility 
to Graduate Dean 

6. The department's recommendation is reviewed and the student is notified of 
the action taken on the request for admission. 

7. Student arrives, reports to the department, is assigned an adviser and 
makes out a roster of courses in consultation with the departmental adviser. 

8. Advisory committee of at least four graduate faculty members, one of whom 
is designated as the chair and one of whom represents the minor field, 
appointed by the Graduate Dean upon the recommendation of the depart- 
ment head. 

9. A dissertation subject is selected and an outline of the proposed research 
submitted to the student's advisory committee and the department head for 
review and approval. 

10. Plan of Work prepared by the advisory committee with the student and 
submitted in quadruplicate to the department head and the Graduate 
School for approval as soon as feasible after completion of 12 hours of course 
work. 

11. Three copies of the approved Plan of Work returned to the department. One 
copy is kept in department files, one is returned to the committee chair and 
one is given to the student. 

12. Student passes language examination(s). (See page 43.) 

13. Written examinations in the major and minor fields are scheduled no earlier 
than the end of the second year of graduate study and not later than one 
semester before the final oral examination. The results of these examina- 
tions will be reported to the Graduate School. 

14. When all written examinations have been completed satisfactorily, the 
chairman requests the scheduling of the preliminary oral examination at 
least two weeks prior to the suggested date. Upon approval of the request, a 
graduate faculty member is selected to represent the Graduate School at the 
examination, and the student and examining committee are notified of the 
time and place. The report of the examination is sent to the Graduate School 
and if the examination has been passed without conditions, the student is 
admitted to candidacy 

15. A copy of the preliminary draft of the dissertation is submitted to the chair 
of the student's advisory committee for review. 

16. The diploma order request form must be filed with the Graduate School by 
the end of the third week of the semester or summer session of anticipated 
graduation. Failure to submit the form by this date may result in the 
student's not receiving the diploma at graduation. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 47 



17. At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, the chair of the 
student's advisory committee submits the dissertation to advisory commit- 
tee members for review. 

18. One semester or its equivalent after admission to candidacy or later, per- 
mission for the candidate to take the final oral examination is requested of 
the Graduate School by the chair of the candidate's advisory committee. 
Requests should be filed at least two weeks before the date of the examina- 
tion and must be accompanied by a certification that the dissertation is 
complete except for such revisions as may be necessary as a result of the final 
examination. Upon approval of the request, the student and the examining 
committee, including a Graduate School representative, are notified of the 
time and place of the examination. The Graduate School Representative 
receives a copy of the dissertation at least one week prior to the examination. 

19. Three copies of the dissertation signed by each member of the student's 
advisory committee and five copies of the abstract must be submitted to the 
Graduate School by a specific deadline in the semester or summer session in 
which the degree is to be conferred. Specific deadline dates appear in The 
Calendar. One copy each of the University Microfilms Agreement and the 
Survey of Earned Doctorate forms must be submitted with the dissertation. 

20. The dissertation is reviewed by the Graduate School to insure that the 
format conforms with the specifications prescribed in the Guide for the 
Preparation of Theses. 

21. All course work scheduled in a graduate degree classification must be 
completed prior to graduation. 

22. A grade point average of at least 3.0 is required for graduation. 

23. The statute of limitations for completion of degree requirements is des- 
cribed on page 45. 



48 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



The D. H. Hill Library 

Library facilities at North Carolina State University include the main D. H. 
Hill Library and special libraries for the School of Design and the Colleges of 
Textiles, Forest Resources and Veterinary Medicine as well as the Curriculum 
Materials Center in the College of Education. The collections, totaling more than 
1,278,592 books and bound journals, 2,711,126 microforms, and 700,000 govern- 
ment publications, have been carefully assembled to serve the educational and 
research programs of the University. 

The D. H. Hill Library contains particularly strong research holdings in the 
biological and physical sciences and in all fields of engineering, agriculture and 
forestry. The collection of books and journals in the humanities and social sci- 
ences is especially strong in English and American literature, sociology and 
economics. 

The library's comprehensive collection of journals emphasizes the major teach- 
ing and research interests at NCSU; approximately 13,500 journals are received 
regularly. A large collection of state and federal government publications 
further strengthens the library's research holdings. The D. H. Hill Library has 
been a depository for U. S. federal documents since 1924. The Library has a 
comphrehensive collection of government research reports on microfiche includ- 
ing reports published by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor 
agencies, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the Energy Research and 
Development Administration (ERDA); also, the National Aeronautical and 
Space Administration (NASA), the Educational Resources Information Center 
(ERIC) and the National Technical Information Service (NTIS). The library is an 
official U.S. Patent depository and has a complete collection of U.S. patents on 
microfilm from 1790 to date. 

The Textiles Library, located in Nelson Textile Building, contains holdings in 
the fields of textiles and textile chemistry. It is regarded as one of the best textile 
libraries in the country. The School of Design Library, in Brooks Hall, has a fine 
collection of books, journals and slides in the areas of architecture, landscape 
architecture and product design. The Forest Resources Library, located in Bilt- 
more Hall, contains a collection of 11,000 monographs in areas ranging from 
tourism to chemical engineering to botany to hotel management to wood frame 
construction and is complemented by several hundred serial titles and over 
12,000 uncataloged reports. The Veterinary Medical Library is a growing collec- 
tion that serves the students and faculty of the College of Veterinary Medicine. 
The Curriculum Materials Center, administered by the College of Education, is 
located in Poe Hall. The center maintains a collection of educational materials 
with particular emphasis on teaching methods, research, administration and 
psychology and includes films, filmstrips, slides, audio tapes, video cassettes and 
simulation games. A special collection of materials covering the areas of anthro- 
pology and third world countries is also maintained. Audiovisual equipment is 
available for previewing materials in the center and may be borrowed for use in 
Poe Hall classrooms. The center acquires each textbook adopted by the State 
Board of Education for secondary level subjects as well as other textbooks and 
reference materials. 

On-line computer-based literature searches are offered by the Library staff on 
over 100 data bases, including ERIC, BIOSIS, AGRICOLA (Bibliography of 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 49 



Agriculture) and Psychological Abstracts. Only direct costs are charged to the 
user. 

As a further aid to graduate and faculty research, the library provides interli- 
brary loan services to obtain material from other research libraries. Direct 
borrowing privileges are available with UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke University. 

Among the many services offered by the library are orientation tours for 
faculty and graduate students and also lectures on library use to all new students. 
Comprehensive reference service is available almost all the hours the library is 
open. A variety of microtext readers and printers in the library and an extensive 
microfilm collection provide access to much important research material. The 
Media Center is equipped with audio and video equipment for group and individ- 
ual viewing and listening. The Library has a growing collection of video and 
audio cassettes for individual and class use. 

Institutes 

RESEARCH TRIANGLE 

The unique "Research Triangle" in North Carolina has captured national and 
international attention. It is a complex of three major research universities and a 
research park. Because of this wealth of educational and research opportunities, 
the Triangle area contains the highest total of Ph.D. scientists and engineers on a 
per capita basis in the nation. The Triangle Universities— NCSU, the University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University— have a subsidiary cam- 
pus in the Park — the Research Triangle Institute — which has an annual research 
revenue of approximately $60 million. 

The Park, which announced its first tenant in 1965, now has over 57 public and 
industrial research organizations situated on 6,650 acres of land. Over 25,000 
people work in the Research Triangle Park. Organizations in the Park include 
the permanent headquarters of the National Institute of Environmental Health 
Sciences, the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Center for the 
Humanities as well as facilities of private companies like IBM, Glaxco and 
Burroughs Wellcome. Two major new research complexes for microelectronics 
and biotechnology recently built in the Park. Faculty and graduate students 
from the universities work closely with many of the companies and agencies in 
the Park and scientists from the Park frequently hold adjunct appointments in 
one or another of the Triangle Universities. 

INSTITUTE OF STATISTICS 

The Institute of Statistics is composed of two sections, one at Raleigh and the 
other at Chapel Hill. At North Carolina State University, the Institute provides 
statistical consulting services to all branches of the institution, sponsors research 
in statistical theory and methodology and coordinates the teaching of statistics at 
the undergraduate and graduate levels. The instructional and other academic 
functions are performed by the Department of Statistics, which forms a part of 
the Institute. 



50 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

The Water Resources Research Institute is a unit of the University of North 
Carolina System and is located on the campus of North Carolina State Univer- 
sity. The deans of the College of Engineering and College of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences, the Vice Chancellor for Research at North Carolina State University 
and two faculty members from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
serve as a board of directors. The Institute was established to promote a multidis- 
ciplinary attack on water problems, to develop and support research in response 
to the needs of North Carolina, to encourage strengthened educational programs 
in water resources, to coordinate research and educational programs dealing 
with water resources and to provide a link between the state and federal water 
resources agencies and related interests in the University. 

Research and educational activities are conducted through established 
departments and schools of the University System. All senior colleges and uni- 
versities of North Carolina are eligible to participate in the Institute's research 
program. Basic support for the Institute's program is provided by the Office of 
Water Research and Technology, U.S. Department of the Interior, under the 
Water Research and Development Act of 1978 and appropriations from the State 
of North Carolina. 

The Institute has sponsored a graduate minor in water resources which offers a 
strong water resources program with the major in any of the basic disciplines 
contributing to water resources planning, conservation, development and man- 
agement. This capitalizes on the combined training resources of the Raleigh and 
Chapel Hill campuses of the University System and offers these in an organized 
way to graduate students seeking interdisciplinary training in this field. Addi- 
tional information concerning the program is presented elsewhere in this 
catalog. 

The Institute sponsors research and educational symposia and seminars, 
encourages the development of specialized training opportunities and provides a 
means for the continuing evaluation and strengthening of the University Sys- 
tem's total water resources program. 

Special Laboratories and Facilities 

ACADEMIC COMPUTING FACILITIES 

Centralized computing facilities for the University are located in the Hills- 
borough Building, in other campus buildings and at Triangle Universities Com- 
putation Center (TUCC) in the Research Triangle Park about fifteen miles from 
the campus. TUCC is owned by North Carolina State University, Duke Univer- 
sity and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and provides computing 
to over twenty research and educational institutions in North Carolina. Access to 
computing facilities at universities outside North Carolina is available to the 
University through TUCC via the Internet, Bitnet and Telenet Networks. 

Computing at TUCC is supplied by an IBM System 3081 Model KX-32 with a 
main memory of 32 megabytes, disk storage of over 45 gigabytes and a variety of 
peripheral and communications equipment. Data are transmitted to and from 
TUCC via the University's Computer Communications System from many com- 
puting sites on the campus. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 51 

The main campus computing facility is an IBM 4381-P12 with 16 million bytes 
of memory and a VAX 8700 with 32 megabytes providing interactive computing 
services. There is also an IBM 3083 providing administrative data processing 
services for the campus. These systems are located at the Computing Center in 
the Hillsborough Building. A high-speed computer terminal facility and 
computer-to-computer communication with TUCC is provided by the Computing 
Center. Interactive terminals are located throughout the campus. 

A number of special purpose computing facilities also exist. The Computer 
Graphics Center (CGC) provides a centralized hardware and software facility for 
image processing and remote sensing. Computers installed include a VAX 
11/780 and a number of microprocessors. Peripherals include image display and 
manipulation devices, plotters, printers, a color graphic camera system and 
digitizing tables. Software is composed of packages for remote sensing, image 
processing, time series analysis and computer graphics. Other facilities in most 
schools provide specialized educational and research computing for their 
students. 

BIOLOGY FIELD LABORATORY 

The Biology Field Laboratory is located eight miles from the University cam- 
pus and comprises a 20-acre pond, 180 acres of extremely varied vegetation types 
and a modern laboratory building. The latter contains two laboratories, one for 
class use and another principally for research. 

The many unique ecological situations found in this area make it ideal for use 
by advanced classes of most biological science departments. Likewise, the area is 
well adapted to a variety of research projects by faculty, graduate students and 
undergraduates because of its habitat diversity. The close proximity of the 
laboratory facility to the campus makes possible many types of behavioral, 
physiological, ecological, taxonomic and limnological studies that could be 
accomplished only with great difficulty at other locations. 

CENTER FOR COMMUNICATIONS AND SIGNAL PROCESSING 

North Carolina State University was selected as a site for an Industry/Univer- 
sity/Government Cooperative Research Center for Communications and Signal 
Processing. The National Science Foundation awarded the University a five- 
year grant totaling $650,000 to be used in conjunction with company membership 
fees to begin operation of the Center. As of July, 1987, the Center had the 
following industrial members: Carolina Power and Light Company, Digital 
Equipment Corp., International Business Machines, Westinghouse Electric 
Corp., General Electric, Northern Telecom, FiberLAN, United Technologies, 
AIRMICS, UNISYS, Harris Corp., AT&T and Tellabs. The two objectives of the 
Center are to conduct basic and applied research that can lead to products and 
services in the communications and signal processing fields and to strengthen 
industry/university/government relationships. In addition to providing useful 
research services to industrial participants, the Center will enhance the educa- 
tion of graduate students by providing them with practical, relevant research 
topics and the means for carrying out their research. 



52 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CENTER FOR SOUND AND VIBRATION 

The Center for Sound and Vibration, established in 1969 and administered 
within the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, is composed 
of faculty pursuing the solution of a wide variety of problems such as occur in 
machinery and aircraft design particularly related to vibration and sound. 
Graduate programs exist at M.S. and Ph.D. levels in fields such as noise and 
vibration control, aeroacoustics, hearing conservation, computer-aided machin- 
ery design, active control of vibration and sound, and signal processing. Out- 
standing experimental facilities, which include large anechoic and reverberant 
rooms and computer graphics equipment, are available. The Center's programs 
are financed largely by grants and contracts from industry and federal and state 
agencies. 

COUNSELING LABORATORY 

The Department of Counselor Education maintains a special counseling facil- 
ity on the fifth floor of Poe Hall. The laboratory is staffed by professionally 
trained graduate students under the supervision of departmental faculty. The 
major emphasis is on helping a wide variety of persons who face educational, 
career and personal decisions through short-term counseling and advising. 
Occupational exploration and aptitude testing are often included. A minimal fee 
($10.00) is charged. Appointments are available during the fall and spring 
semesters. 

DIAGNOSTIC TEACHING CLINIC 

The Diagnostic Teaching Clinic is operated by the graduate program in special 
education within the College of Education for the purposes of providing graduate 
students with opportunities to gain both observational and applied clinical expe- 
rience in diagnosing and teaching handicapped children of all ages. The clinic 
accepts referrals from local school systems and from nonpublic school agencies, 
and the students and staff evaluate the referred children, develop educational 
programs for them in conjunction with the referring agency and demonstrate 
teaching techniques for the benefit of those persons who will work with the 
children. This clinic is open during the day, late afternoon and early evening 
hours during the fall and spring semesters and throughout the summer months 
and is utilized by graduate students from several departments with allied cur- 
ricula in education and psychology. 

ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH CENTER 

The Electric Power Research Center is a university/industry cooperative 
research center recently established within the NCSU College of Engineering. 
The Center is funded by the University and sponsoring organizations from the 
various sectors of the electric utility and power industry. The purpose of the 
Center is to engage in collaborative efforts aimed at enhancing the excellence of 
research and graduate-level degree programs in electric power systems engi- 
neering. This primary purpose is accomplished by providing support for inter- 
ested faculty and students to be involved in basic and applied research directly 
relevant to the needs of the multifaceted electric power industry. Motivation to 
work with the Center derives from the close university/industry interaction, the 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 53 

leverage afforded to an industrial sponsor's membership dues and the enhanced 
professional and research opportunities provided to faculty and students in 
electric power engineering. 

While the current research program involves faculty from the Department of 
Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Nuclear Engi- 
neering, the Center will facilitate access to all the various resources of the 
University and for all sectors of the electric power industry. 

ELECTRON MICROSCOPE FACILITIES 

There are four electron microscope facilities at NCSU available to graduate 
students and faculty for research purposes. The College of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences (SALS) Center for Electron Microscopy is located in Gardner Hall, the 
Engineering Research Microscope Facility is in Burlington Engineering Labs 
and the Department of Wood and Paper Science Electron Microscopy Lab is in 
Biltmore Hall. The new College of Veterinary Medicine (C VM) Electron Micros- 
copy Laboratory is located in the NCSU College of Veterinary Medicine on 
Hillsborough Street. 

The ALS Electron Microscope Center has two scanning microscopes: a 
Philips 505T and a JEOL T-200 and four transmission electron microscopes: an 
Hitachi HS-8-B, an Hitachi HU-ll-B, a JEOL 100-S and a Philips 400T-STEM 
equipped with a C-400-M computer control system. The Center also makes avail- 
able all of the necessary biological preparatory equipment. 

Formal instruction is provided through the biological sciences curriculum for 
transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and ultrami- 
crotomy. Advanced techniques are provided on an individual basis or through 
workshops. 

The Engineering Research Analytical Instrument Facility is equipped 
with new Hitachi scanning transmission (model H-800) and scanning electron 
(model S-530) microscopes, both equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spec- 
trometers (Tracor Northern TN 2000 and TN 5500) in addition to older JEOL 
and Cambridge SEM's. 

The H-800 STEM has a maximum accelerating voltage of 200 kV and a 
lanthanum hexaboride gun, providing high image brightness and penetration 
with minimal specimen damage, which is used for ceramic, metallurgical, elec- 
tronic and textile materials. Computer control of all lenses and a motorized 
45-degree double-tilting stage make it easy to use, and a high takeoff angle X-ray 
detector provides high sensitivity elementary analysis, including mapping and 
quantitative capability. The instrument operates in scanning, transmission and 
STEM modes with full diffraction capability. 

The S-530 SEM accommodates large (6-inch) specimens, has an ultra-low 
voltage mode for uncoated surface examination and has highly automated focus 
and picture-taking controls for routine high-quality images. In addition to 50- 
angstrom resolution secondary electron pictures, the microscope is equipped 
with a high-resolution backscattered electron detector and a computerized quan- 
titative X-ray spectrometer and EBIC and EBIV systems. 

Both microscopes are supported by complete specimen preparation and dark- 
room facilities and an extensive computerized image processing, analysis and 
measurement system. The analytical instruments center also operates an elec- 
tron probe microanalyzer (AMR/3) for wavelength dispersive X-ray analysis on 



54 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



the micrometer level, several light microscopes and X-ray diffractometers, and 
an Auger electron spectrometer with ion sputtering which allows depth profiling 
of elemental composition. 

A new scanning Auger microprobe has recently been added (JEOL J AMP 30). 
This systems features a complete analytical SEM with full automation and an 
Auger electron spectrometer system for qualitative and quantitative surface 
analysis. The system also features electron channeling capabilities. 

In addition, an ion probe microanalyzer (Cameca IMS 3f) performs secondary 
ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with sub-micron lateral resolution and atomic 
layer depth resolution and typical detection limits in the ppm-ppb range. Both 
oxygen and cesium ion sources are available and a digital imaging system is used 
to interpret the three-dimensional elemental distributions. The instrument is 
used particularly for engineering, electronic and biological materials. 

Center personnel teach regular courses covering many of these instrument 
techniques as well as short courses and offer collaboration with and instruction 
for graduate students on an individual basis. 

The Department of Wood and Paper Science Microscopy Lab is equipped 
with a Siemens Elmskop-1 A transmission electron microscope as well as all other 
equipment necessary for the preparation and study of specimens. Instruction for 
graduate students engaged in research is on an individual need basis. 

The CVM Electron Microscopy Laboratory is a facility housing a Philips 
410 transmission electron microscope for biological specimens and a JOEL JSM- 
35 scanning electron microscope. All the back-up equipment for preparing spec- 
imens to be viewed with either instrument are housed within the Laboratory as 
well as complete darkroom facilities for the preparation of routine and publica- 
tion material. A course covering biological scanning and transmission electron 
microscopy is offered yearly. The Laboratory also offers complete electron 
microscopy service support to those users desiring it. 

HIGHLANDS BIOLOGICAL STATION 

North Carolina State University is an institutional member of the Highlands 
Biological Foundation which provides support for the Highlands Biological Sta- 
tion of the University of North Carolina. This is an inland biological field station 
located at Highlands, North Carolina. The town of Highlands is in the heart of the 
Southern Appalachians at an elevation of 3,823 feet. The area has an extremely 
diverse biota and the highest rainfall in the eastern United States. 

Facilities are available throughout the year for pre-and post-doctoral research 
in botany, zoology, soils and geology. The laboratory building with research 
rooms and cubicles and the library are well equipped for field-oriented research. 
Also, five cottages and a dining hall are located on the edge of a six-acre lake. In 
addition to 16 acres surrounding the lake, the station owns several tracts of 
undisturbed forested land available for research. Research grants available 
through the Station provide stipends for room, board and research expenses. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 55 



INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 
INSTITUTE 

The Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering Institute has been estab- 
lished at North Carolina State University to provide a multifaceted educational, 
research and technology transfer program in manufacturing systems engineer- 
ing. The objectives of this program to educate engineers in the theory and 
practice of integrated manufacturing systems technology; to conduct basic and 
applied research on topics in cooperation with industry on problems of contem- 
porary manufacturing systems application; and to engage in technology transfer 
with industry to increase productivity and the quality of manufactured products. 

Central to all aspects of the Institute's operation and activity is the integration 
of computer-aided processes in the design and control of manufacturing facilities 
in order to strengthen the country's ability to produce manufactured goods of 
improved quality at lowered cost. Through both internally and externally funded 
research projects the Institute plans to contribute to the solution of generic design 
and manufacturing engineering problems and to provide a vehicle for technology 
transfer. 

MATERIALS RESEARCH CENTER 

The Materials Research Center was established in 1984 at NCSU as an inter- 
disciplinary program involving persons representing the Department of Chem- 
istry, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Materials Engineering and Phys- 
ics. The thrust area of the Center serves as a focal point for this cooperative 
research. However, the experimental efforts are conducted within the four 
departments noted above. 

MICROELECTRONICS CENTER OF NORTH CAROLINA 

North Carolina State University is a participating member of the Microelec- 
tronics Center of North Carolina (MCNC) which has been established to support 
the academic and research programs in microelectronics in North Carolina. 
Other participating institutions are the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill, Duke University, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State Univer- 
sity, the Research Triangle Institute and the University of North Carolina at 
Charlotte. 

Faculty and students at NCSU have access to the use of MCNC facilities on 
sponsored research projects and for formal academic courses including microe- 
lectronics design and fabrication laboratories. Areas of interest include systems 
design, systems engineering, integrated circuit technology, semiconductor 
materials and device physics. Departments at NCSU which are actively involved 
in the program include Electrical and Computer Engineering. Computer 
Science, Physics, Chemistry and Materials Engineering. 

NUCLEAR REACTOR PROGRAM FACILITIES 

The Nuclear Reactor Program provides specialized nuclear facilities to the 
educational, industrial and governmental organizations of North Carolina for 



56 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



the purposes of teaching, research and service. The Program facilities include (i) 
the PULSTAR, a 1-megawatt research and training nuclear reactor with unique 
neutron irradiation capabilities, (ii) an analytical laboratory featuring neutron 
activation analysis and radioisotope production and measurement and (iii) a 
thermal-hydraulics laboratory which has developed a freon loop to simulate the 
operation of a pressurized water reactor. The Nuclear Reactor Program is asso- 
ciated with the Department of Nuclear Engineering and is located in the Bur- 
lington Engineering Laboratories on campus. 

ORGANIZATION FOR TROPICAL STUDIES 

North Carolina State University is an institutional member of the Organiza- 
tion for Tropical Studies (OTS), a consortium of North and Central American 
universities which maintains field research and teaching facilities in Costa Rica. 
Each year OTS sponsors courses in tropical biology that are open to NCSU 
graduate students with biological science backgrounds. These 8-week courses, 
offered in winter and summer, are taught in Costa Rica and make use of a 
network of field stations located throughout the country. NCSU is an active 
participant in the OTS graduate education program, with an average attendance 
of two students per year in the tropical biology courses. 

The OTS facilities in Costa Rica also provide a unique opportunity for tropical 
research by NCSU graduate students and faculty. The principal field station, 
located in the northeastern Atlantic lowlands, has excellent laboratory and hous- 
ing facilities and provides access to a 3,500-acre tract owned by OTS; 65% of this 
tract is undisturbed lowland tropical wet forest. Another station is located at 
mid-elevation in southeastern Costa Rica near the Panamanian border. OTS also 
utilizes various other sites, including a seasonally dry area in the northwestern 
part of the country and a high-elevation area at 10,000 feet in the Talamanca 
range. More information about OTS may be obtained from the campus represen- 
tative, who can be contacted through the International Programs Office. 

PESTICIDE RESIDUE RESEARCH LABORATORY 

The Pesticide Residue Research Laboratory is a facility in the College of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences devoted to research on pesticide residues in anim- 
als, plants, soils, water and other entities of man's environment. Although the 
laboratory is administered through the Department of Entomology, it serves the 
total needs of the College in cooperative research projects requiring assistance on 
pesticide residue analysis. 

The laboratory functions as a focal point for residue research involving inter- 
departmental cooperation, but faculty in the laboratory also conduct independ- 
ent pesticide research on persistence and decomposition in soils and plants, 
absorption and translocation in plants, distribution in environment and contam- 
ination of streams, estuaries and ground water. 

The laboratory is equipped with the latest analytical instruments. Graduate 
study can be undertaken in any aspect of pesticide residues either in the Pesticide 
Residue Research Laboratory or in one of the cooperating departments. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 57 



PRECISION ENGINEERING CENTER 

The Precision Engineering Laboratory was established with a $1.25 million 
grant from the Office of Naval Research in 1982. The goal is to develop techniques 
for precision manufacturing at tolerances below those attainable with current 
technology. For example, fabrication of electro-optical devices require manufac- 
turing tolerances better than 1 millionth of an inch. This goal requires new 
methods for monitoring and controlling the parts being produced or the process 
being performed. Specific research objectives involve the study of metrology 
systems, control algorithms, machine structural dynamics, optics, materials, and 
microprocessors and the details of many different fabrication processes. An 
interdisciplinary team of faculty from Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 
Materials Science and Engineering, Computer Science and Physics along with 
research staff and graduate students are working together to address these 
research areas. 

In 1985 the program was expanded with industrial and national laboratory 
support and in 1986, the program was funded under the University Research 
Initiative program at ONR for one million dollars a year for five years. These 
organizations foresee the need for scientists and engineers with a background in 
precision engineering as well as new technology to meet their growing demands 
for high-precision products. With this expanded base of support, the Precision 
Engineering Laboratory is fulfilling these needs. 

PSYCHO-EDUCATIONAL CLINIC AND LABORATORIES 

The Department of Psychology operates the Psycho-Educational Clinic located 
in Poe Hall. The clinic provides both a service to the public and training for school 
psychology graduate students. School-age child assessment and program devel- 
opment are the major services provided. Coordination of internships and practica 
is also administered through this facility. 

Each graduate program in psychology also has laboratory facilities, either 
independently or shared. Thus, the experimental psychology program has labor- 
atories for neuropsychology, auditory and visual perception, cognition and oper- 
ant behavior. There is also a training and development laboratory as well as 
facilities for ergonomics, applied developmental educational psychology, human 
resource development, industrial/organizational and vocational psychology and 
social psychology. The latter facilities include one-way viewing rooms with 
recording equipment. 

REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY RESEARCH LABORATORY 

The Reproductive Physiology Research Laboratory administered through the 
Department of Animal Science includes environmental control rooms designed 
to provide constant levels of air temperature, humidity and light for animals 
involved in studies on reproduction. Facilities and equipment are available for 
surgery, in vitro growth of embryos, isotope labeling in embryo metabolism and 
transfer of embryos between females. 



58 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Support for research at both the master's and the doctoral levels is available. 
Students may elect a comparative approach to a specific problem in mammalian 
reproduction, working with several species, or they may choose to work with a 
single species. Generally students select a problem associated with the identifica- 
tion of factors influencing early prenatal development, the endocrine control of 
ovarian function or some aspect of elucidation and control of aberrations in 
mammalian reproduction. 

Cooperative research is possible between the laboratory, the College of Veteri- 
nary Medicine and the Medical School or the Environmental Health Sciences 
Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for those students 
desiring a broader training in the general area of reproductive physiology. 

Students whose work is concentrated in reproductive physiology can major in 
either animal science or physiology with a minor in related disciplines. 

SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM 

The University of North Carolina Sea Grant College Program is a state/federal 
partnership program involving all campuses of the UNC system. A majority of 
its activities, however, are conducted at the NCSU campus. Sea Grant combines 
the University's expertise in research, extension and education to focus on practi- 
cal solutions to problems in the area of coastal and marine resource use and 
conservation. Graduate and undergraduate research opportunities rest with 
individual project directors on campus and a special fellowship program admin- 
istered through the program office. 

SOUTHEASTERN PLANT ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORIES 
PHYTOTRON 

The Southeastern Plant Environment Laboratory, often referred to as the 
North Carolina State University Phytotron, is especially designed for research 
dealing with the response of plants and microorganisms to their environment. A 
high degree of environmental control makes possible simulation of a wide range 
of climates found in tropical, temperate and northern zones. 

Research in the Phytotron deals with all phases of plant biology. Although the 
majority of the studies are conducted with agricultural crop species, the Phyto- 
tron can accommodate ecological investigations, plant biology problems of the 
space program, experimental taxonomy and air pollution studies as well as basic 
physiological and biochemical research. 

The Phytotron facility is available to the resident research staff, participants in 
graduate research programs of North Carolina State University and to domestic 
and foreign visiting scientists. 

TRIANGLE UNIVERSITIES NUCLEAR LABORATORY 

TUNL is a laboratory for nuclear structure research. Located on the campus of 
Duke University in Durham the laboratory is staffed by faculty members and 
graduate students in the Departments of Physics of Duke University, the Univer 
sity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University. 
Particle accelerators are used to bombard target nuclei with an assortment of 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 59 



ions of accurately controlled energy spread and spin orientation. The accelera- 
tors are a 15 MeV tandem Van de Graaff generator into which negative ions are 
injected by a 15 MeV AVG cyclotron and a 3 MeV and a 4 MeV Van de Graaff 
generator. Polarized and pulsed beams are available as well as a new polarized 
target. On-line computers are used for data collection and analysis. 

Personnel from NCSU are partners in the maintenance and operation of the 
laboratory. There is extensive collaboration with personnel from the other two 
participating universities. This laboratory, which began operation in 1968, was 
the first to combine a cyclotron and tandem Van de Graaff generator — the 
"Cyclo-Graaff." 

Special Programs 

INTERNATIONAL AREA STUDIES GROUPS 

The International Area Studies Groups, comprised of faculty from across the 
university with common interests in an international studies area, provide a 
forum for sharing professional experiences; generating and identifying support 
sources for collaborative scholarly activities; offering seminars for the univer- 
sity; providing a public-service function for the campus and community at large 
by identifying faculty with expertise in their study area; interacting with visiting 
scholars and students from the geographic area specific to the study group; and 
serving an advisory role in institutional linkage development between NCSU and 
universities in the study area. 

RESEARCH PROGRAM AT THE OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED 
UNIVERSITIES 

North Carolina State University is one of the sponsoring institutions of the Oak 
Ridge Associated Universities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Through this coopera- 
tive association, North Carolina State's graduate research program has at its 
disposal the facilities and research staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 
Extensive research programs are underway there on physical and biological 
effects of radiation, radioisotope utilization, materials microstructure and many 
other areas of materials and nuclear science and engineering. When master's and 
doctoral candidates have completed their resident work, it may be possible, by 
special arrangement, for them to do their thesis research at Oak Ridge National 
Laboratory. In addition, it is possible for the staff members of this University to 
go to Oak Ridge for advanced study in their particular fields. 

UNIVERSITY PATENT AND COPYRIGHT 
PROCEDURES 

North Carolina State University is dedicated to teaching, research and extend- 
ing knowledge to the public. 

It is the policy of the University to carry out its scholarly work in an open and 
free atmosphere and to publish results obtained therefrom freely, limited only by 
a short time delay in cases in which this is necessary to establish patent rights. 
Although the University does not undertake research or developmental work 



60 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



principally for the purpose of developing patents and commercial applications 
thereof, patentable inventions sometimes arise out of the research activities of its 
employees which are carried out wholly or in part with University facilities. As a 
public service institution, the University has an interest in assuring the utiliza- 
tion of such inventions for the public good. Protection must be provided for at 
least some of these inventions through patents and the licensing thereof to 
encourage their development and marketing. Patents and their exploitation, 
however, represent only a small part of the benefits accruing from either publicly 
or privately sponsored research. 

A portion of the research conducted by the University is supported by govern- 
ment and a portion by private industry. Service to the public, including private 
industry, is an integral part of the University's mission. As a public institution, 
the University, in its agreements with private industry or other private organiza- 
tions, must keep the interests of the general public in view. The rights and 
privileges set forth in cooperative agreements or contracts, with respect to pat- 
ents developed as a result of research partly or wholly financed by private 
parties, must be fair and just to the inventor(s), the sponsor and the public. 
Research should be undertaken by the University under support from private 
parties only if it is consistent with and complementary to the University's goals 
and responsibilities to the public. 

SECTION 100-Purposes: 

The North Carolina State University Patent and Copyright Procedures are 
designed to implement the Patent and Copyright Policies of The University of 
North Carolina. The procedures incorporate the interests of the faculty, staff, and 
students, the institution, and the sponsors of research, because in many cases 
those interests are congruent in desiring to encourage innovation and assure 
broad dissemination of the results of research. These procedures are designed to 
stimulate and recognize creativity among the faculty, staff, and students, and to 
establish an institutional process that is flexible enough to accommodate the 
different types of research and patentable work conducted at a comprehensive 
research university such as NCSU. Equity and fairness are goals of the proce- 
dures in all respects, not only in the distribution of royalty, but also in recognition. 
While much documentation related to patents, by its very nature, must be confi- 
dential, these procedures are designed to be understood by all faculty, staff and 
students so that they may take advantage of the options available for transfer of 
University discoveries into useful products that benefit the public. Finally, these 
procedures should provide an efficient and timely mechanism for reaching a 
decision about patenting with a minimum involvement of the inventor's time so 
that he or she may continue to be productive in the laboratory and classroom. To 
this end the University employs a patents administrator whose duties include 
providing assistance to faculty, staff and students in matters related to inven- 
tions. 

SECTION 200-Ownership: 

1. As defined by the Patent and Copyright Policies of the Board of Governors of 
The University of North Carolina, to which these Procedures are expressly 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 61 



subject. North Carolina State University has a legal interest in all inventions of 
University personnel, including students, that are conceived or first actually 
reduced to practice as a part of or as a result of: (a) University research; (b) 
activities within the scope of the inventor's employment by, or official association 
with, the University; and (c) activities involving the use of University time, 
facilities, staff, materials, University information not available to the public, or 
funds administered by the University. 

2. Faculty, staff, and students, whose inventions are made on their own time, 
outside the scope of their employment or association with the University and 
without University facilities, materials, or resources and which inventions are, 
therefore, their exclusive property as specified by the Patent and Copyright 
Policies, may submit their invention to the University for possible patenting 
and/or commercial exploitation and management under terms to be agreed upon 
by the inventor and the University. 

3. The provisions of the NCSU Patent Procedures are subject to any applicable 
laws, regulations or specific provisions of the grants or contracts which govern 
the rights in inventions made in connection with sponsored research. 

4. Under the terms of certain contracts and agreements between NCSU and 
various agencies of government, private and public corporations, and private 
interests, NCSU is or may be required to assign or license all patent rights to the 
contracting party. NCSU retains the right to enter into such agreements whe- 
never such action is considered to be both in its best interest and in the public 
interest. Ordinarily, the University will not agree to assign rights in future 
inventions to private corporations or businesses except as set forth in these 
procedures. 

5. All faculty, staff and students engaged in University related or sponsored 
research shall sign a Patent Agreement. 

SECTION 300— Responsibilities of NCSU Personnel: 

1. NCSU personnel who, either alone or in association with others, make an 
invention in which NCSU has or may have an interest shall disclose such inven- 
tions to the Vice Chancellor for Research. The Vice Chancellor for Research will 
promptly acknowledge receipt of disclosures and will distribute the disclosures 
to the Intellectual Property Committee for consideration at its next meeting. 

2. For any invention in which the University has an interest, the inventor, upon 
request of the Vice Chancellor for Research shall execute promptly all contracts, 
assignments, waivers or other legal documents necessary to vest in the Univer- 
sity or its assignees any or all rights to the invention, including complete assign- 
ment of any patents or patent applications relating to the invention. 

3. NCSU personnel may not: (a) sign patent agreements with outside persons or 
organizations that may abrogate the University's rights and interests either as 
stated in the Patent Policies or as provided in any grant or contract funding the 
research which led in whole or in part to making the invention, nor (b) without 
prior authorization, use the name of the University or any of its units in connec- 
tion with any invention in which the University has an interest. 

4. All faculty teaching courses in which students do work that may lead to 
patentable inventions should inform the students of the existence of the NCSU 
Patent and Copyright Policies and of these Procedures. 



62 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SECTION 400— Suggested Procedures For Record-Keeping: 

1. U.S. patent practice places a premium on witnessed records when two or 
more parties claim the same invention. The date the idea occurred (the "concep- 
tion") and the date it was put into practice form ("reduced to practice") are vital. 
Equally important in the eyes of the U.S. Patent Office is the "diligence" shown 
by contending inventors. They must prove that they regularly pursued work on 
the invention, documenting their efforts on a day-by-day basis. The intent of U.S. 
patent laws is to recognize the first inventor; the one who originated the idea. 
Under these laws, the first to conceive and reduce to practice will receive a patent 
if his records bear out his claims; the first to conceive and the last to reduce to 
practice may win if his records show diligence. 

2. The careful recording of ideas and laboratory data is a matter of routine for 
industrial researchers. Each entry is complete and up-to-date, signed and wit- 
nessed; a legal record of the day's work. Record-keeping is not nearly so simple for 
the academic investigator, for he or she may work at odd hours or on weekends; 
may be closeted in a laboratory, an office or at home; and often lacks easy 
accessibility to suitable witnesses. Still, the keeping of a witnessed laboratory 
notebook is advisable. Additionally, such records can serve as valuable reposito- 
ries of new ideas. 



SECTION 500— The Handling of a Disclosure: 

1. When faculty or staff members make an invention, it shall be their responsi- 
bility to discuss their discovery or invention with the Department Head at which 
time the possibility of exploring patenting should be considered. Students should 
first discuss an invention with their instructor, who shall assist them in further 
discussion within the University. The patents administrator is available to dis- 
cuss possible inventions and to assist faculty, staff and students in the prepara- 
tion of disclosures. If the invention appears to be a matter that should be consi- 
dered for patenting, the inventor(s) should prepare a disclosure utilizing 
guidelines for invention disclosures which can be obtained for the patents admin- 
istrator. The Department Head should transmit the disclosure through the Dean 
of his School to the Vice Chancellor for Research for consideration by the Intellec- 
tual Property Committee. 

2. Upon receiving a disclosure, the Chairman of the Intellectual Property 
Committee may refer the disclosure to one of several technical advisory commit- 
tees to the Intellectual Property Committee. Technical advisory committees will 
be appointed by the Vice Chancellor for Research and will be composed of faculty 
and staff who are knowledgable and experienced in broad disciplinary or cross- 
disciplinary areas. These individuals will be asked to review the disclosure from 
the point of view of whether or not, based on their knowledge, they believe the 
invention, if patented, would be a strong, viable, commercial product that would 
have a large market. The technical advisory committee in each area will meet 
prior to each Intellectual Property Committee meeting if they have any 
disclosures presented to them, and will discuss the disclosures and make to the 
Intellectual Property Committee, prior to its meeting, one of the following recommenda- 
tions: 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 63 



A. That the disclosure has significant commercial possibilities. 

B. That the disclosure does not appear to have significant commercial 
possibilities. 

C. That the technical advisory committee could not determine, based on its 
knowledge, whether or not the disclosure has significant commercial possibil- 
ities. 

3. The Intellectual Property Committee will review each written disclosure 
promptly. The inventor or a representative shall be allowed to examine all 
written materials submitted to the Committee in connection with the disclosure 
and to make a written and oral presentation to the Committee. The Committee 
will decide on a disposition of the invention to secure the interests of the Univer- 
sity, the inventor, the sponsor, if any, and the public. Its decision may include, but 
is not limited to, one or a combination of the following: 

A. To submit the disclosure for review by a patent or invention management 
firm or agent; 

B. To make inquiries of potential licensees that may have an interest in the 
invention, including the financing of a patent application, where applicable; 

C. To conduct a patent search concerning the patentability of the disclosure; 

D. To apply for a patent with University resources (an option with limited 
application because of financial constraints); 

E. To release University rights to the inventor subject to an agreement to 
protect the interests of the University, the sponsor, if any, and the public, includ- 
ing an obligation to pay to the University a percentage of future royalties or 
profits in cases where it is necessary to recognize the University's contribution; 

F. To dedicate the invention to the public; 

G. To waive further University interest in the invention. 

4. Normally, within four weeks of the receipt of the disclosure, the inventor will 
be notified in writing of the decision of the Committee on (a) the equities involved 
including financial participation, (b) whether the University plans to file a patent 
application, or (c) whether the University will accept assignment of the invention 
for patenting, licensing and/or commercial handling as applicable. If the Uni- 
versity chooses not to file a patent application for an invention in which it has 
rights, or not to license the invention, or not to dedicate it to the public, upon the 
inventor's written request the invention, at the Committee's discretion, may be 
released in writing to the inventor, with the permission of the sponsor, if any. 

5. In those cases in which the University has obtained a patent without obliga- 
tion to sponsors, if no arrangement has been made for commercial development 
within five years from the date of the issuance of the patent, the inventor(s) may 
request in writing an assignment of the University's patent rights. The Intellec- 
tual Property Committee will promptly either grant the request or advise the 
inventor of the University's plans for the development of the invention. 

SECTION 600-Royalty: 

1. NCSU shall share with the inventors revenue it receives from patents or 
inventions. As noted in Section 200 (4), specific provisions of grants or contracts 
may govern rights and revenue distribution regarding inventions made in con- 
nection with sponsored research; consequently, revenues the University receives 
from such inventions may be exclusive of payments of royalty shares to sponsors 
or contractors. 



64 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



2. The gross royalty revenues (net amount received by the University if there is 
a specific agreement in a grant or contract with a sponsor) generated by a patent 
or invention shall be the basis upon which the inventor's royalty is calculated. 
Unless otherwise agreed, the inventor's share of royalty revenues shall be 25% of 
the gross revenue. In the case of co-inventors, the 25% of gross revenue shall be 
subdivided equally among them, unless the inventors, with the concurrence of the 
Intellectual Property Committee, determine a different share to be appropriate. 
All such determinations shall be made in writing at the time of disclosure. 
Applicable laws, regulations or provisions of grants or contracts may, however, 
require that a lesser share be paid to the inventor. In no event shall the share 
payable to the inventor or inventors in the aggregate by the University be less 
than 15% of gross royalties received by the University. 

3. To the extent practicable and consistent with State and University budget 
policies, the remaining revenue received by the University on account of an 
invention willfirst be applied to reimburse the University for expenses incurred 
by it in obtaining and maintaining patents and/or in marketing, licensing and 
defending patents or licensable inventions and the remainder will be dedicated to 
research purposes that may include research in the inventor's department or 
unit, if approved by the Chancellor upon recommendation of the Intellectual 
Property Committee. 

SECTION 700— Inventor Requests for Waiver of University Rights: 

1 . If an inventor believes that the invention was made outside the general scope 
of his or her University duties, and if the inventor does not choose to assign the 
rights in the invention to the University, he or she shall, in the invention dis- 
closure, request that the Intellectual Property Committee determine the respec- 
tive rights of the University and the inventor in the invention and shall also 
include information on the following points: 

A. The circumstances under which the invention was made and developed: 

B. The employee's official duties at the time of the making of the invention; 

C. The inventor's intention to request an acknowledgment that the University 
has no claim if such request is deemed appropriate; 

D. The extent to which the inventor is willing voluntarily to assign domestic 
and foreign rights in the invention to the University if it should be determined 
that an assignment of the invention to the University is not required under the 
Patent and Copyright Policies; 

E. The inventor's intention to request that the University prosecute a patent 
application if it should be determined that an assignment of the invention to the 
University is not required under the Patent and Copyright Policies. 

SECTION 800-Publication and Public Use 

1. North Carolina State University strongly encourages scholarly publication 
of the results of research by faculty and students. Though the Patent and Copy- 
right Policies do not limit the right to publish, except for short periods of time 
necessary to protect patent rights, publication or public use of an invention 
constitutes a statutory bar to the granting of a United States patent for the 
invention unless a patent application is filed within one year of the date of such 
publication or public use. Publication or public use also can be an immediate bar 
to patentability in certain foreign countries. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 65 

2. In order to preserve rights in unpatented inventions, it shall be the duty of the 
inventor, or of his or her supervisor if the inventor is not available to make such 
report, to report immediately to the Vice Chancellor for Research any publica- 
tion, submission of manuscript for publication, sale, public use, or plans for sale 
or public use, of an invention, if a disclosure has previously been filed. If an 
invention is disclosed to any person who is not employed by the University or 
working in cooperation with the University upon that invention, a record shall be 
kept of the date and extent of the disclosure, the name and address of the person to 
whom the disclosure was made, and the purpose of the disclosure. 

After disclosure to the Intellectual Property Committee, the inventor shall 
immediately notify the Vice Chancellor for Research of the acceptance for publi- 
cation of any manuscript describing the invention or of any sale or public use 
made or planned by the inventor. 

SECTION 900— Contractural Arrangements: 

1. North Carolina State University will normally seek a waiver of patent rights 
in contracts and grants with Federal agencies and in doing so will comply with 
the provisions of Federal law concerning the granting of waivers. 

2. The University normally reserves the right to ownership of patents on 
inventions arising out of research supported in whole or in part by grants or 
contracts with non-governmental organizations or firms. Contracts or agree- 
ments which are entered into between the University and such organizations or 
agencies should contain clauses setting forth such a reservation unless deviations 
therefrom are requested by the sponsor and approved by the Vice Chancellor for 
Research. In the interest of fair treatment to the sponsor in consideration for his 
investment and in the interest of discharging the University's obligation to the 
public in the application of its facilities and employee time and talent, special 
provisions may be negotiated by the Vice Chancellor for Research in such non- 
government sponsored contracts on options such as the following: 

A. The University will retain rights to patents arising out of such sponsored 
research but, if a significant portion of the research costs are borne by the 
sponsor, the sponsor may be assured a non-exclusive, non-assignable license at a 
most favorable royalty rate for the use of the patent. 

B. If the sponsor bears essentially all of the costs of the concerned research, 
including full overhead and all other indirect costs, the University may agree to 
assign its rights to patents generated thereunder to the sponsor if it wishes to 
exercise them, but only under an agreement in which the University is free to use 
the invention for its own research and/or educational purposes without payments 
of royalty fees. In case the University assigns its patent rights to the sponsor 
under this option, the sponsor shall be obligated to utilize the patent, and the 
agreement shall specify that in case of failure to exercise diligent use of the patent 
commercially within a specified period as agreed upon, including offering the 
products manufactured thereunder for general public sale, the patent will revert 
to the University and the University will be free to proceed with licensing and 
application of the invention covered thereby in any manner it sees fit. 

C. If both the sponsor and the University contribute shares in the costs of the 
sponsored investigations, first choice to patent rights on inventions made the- 
reunder may be, by specification in the agreement, accorded to either party but 



66 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

with the stipulation that the party holding patent rights will be obligated to 
exercise use of the patent(s) and with options to the other party in case of failure to 
apply the patent diligently in commercial practice as set forth in B above. In any 
case, the agreement shall stipulate that the University will be free to use the 
invention for its own research and/or educational purposes without payment of 
royalty fees. Under this option, the University and the sponsor shall agree to 
share in net royalties accruing from the patent(s) and the licensing of same in 
proportions approximately equal to their respective declared and verified pro- 
portionate shares in the costs of the investigtions, unless the University should 
elect to dispose of its share by direct sale to the sponsor for an agreed price. 

D. In order to protect the potential patent interests of both parties in such 
contracts in which the sponsor is accorded patent rights, the following procedure 
may be specified: 

"When in the course of the sponsored research project the investigator or 
investigators conceive or reduce to practice some discovery which appears to be 
patentable, then the inventor(s) will immediately inform the sponsors and the 
University of such discovery and will, for a specified period as negotiated (nor- 
mally three months but in any case not more than twelve months), make available 
to the sponsor all pertinent information and disclosures which may be required 
for the development of an appropriate patent application. During this period, the 
investigators agree not to disclose this material to the public and agree to cooper- 
ate in the sponsor's effort to secure the patent. At the end of this agreed period, the 
investigators and the University will be free to proceed with publications and 
making public such other documents as they may choose. With the exception of 
the above mentioned agreed period, the University will operate industry spon- 
sored contracts in the normal manner with no other special considerations being 
given to the sponsor. Under no circumstances will the sponsor have the right to 
prevent the publication of material or information derived during the conduct of 
the program or as a result thereof other than for the agreed period indicated 
above." 

Prior written agreement of the investigators involved in research investiga- 
tions to be carried out under these conditions must be secured by the University to 
enable the University to discharge its agreed obligations under such a contract. 

SECTION 1000— Patent Management and Administration: 

1. North Carolina State University recognizes that the evaluation of inventions 
and discoveries and the administration, development and processing of patents 
and licensable inventions involves substantial time and expense and requires 
talents and experience not ordinarily found among its faculty and staff; there- 
fore, it employs the Director, Office of Technology Administration to provide 
assistance. The University may contract with outside agents for certain services. 
It may enter into a contract or contracts with an outside organization covering 
specific inventions or discoveries believed to be patentable and patents developed 
therefrom or covering all such inventions, discoveries and patents in which the 
University has an interest. The University may manage an invention using its 
own resources. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 67 



2. The Chancellor shall appoint a Intellectual Property Committee consisting 
of no fewer than three members. The Vice Chancellor for Research shall serve as 
Chairman of the Committee. The Committee shall review and recommend to the 
Chancellor or his delegate changes in these Procedures, decide upon appropriate 
disposition' of invention disclosures, resolve questions of invention ownership, 
recommend to the Chancellor the expenditure of invention royalties, and make 
such recommendations as are deemed appropriate to encourage disclosures and 
to assure prompt and effective handling, evaluation, and prosecution of invention 
opportunities and to protect the interests of the University and the public. The 
Director of the Office of Technology Administration shall serve as staff for the 
Committee and shall attend all meetings. 

SECTION 1100— Copyright Procedures: 

1. As a general rule, all rights to copyrightable material are the property of the 
author. The distribution or royalties, if any, is a matter of arrangement between 
the author and his or her publishers or licensees. Different treatment may be 
accorded by the University in case of specific contracts providing for an excep- 
tion, in cases where the University or sponsor may employ personnel for the 
purpose of producing a specific work, where different treatment is deemed 
necessary to reflect the contribution of the institution to the work, as in the case of 
software* or audiovisual material, or where a sponsored agreement requires 
otherwise. All agreements concerning copyright ownership should be in writing 
and should be signed by the parties and approved by the Vice Chancellor for 
Research prior to the commencement of the work. 

2. An institute, center, or other unit of the University that is itself a publisher 
and that engages faculty members and other employees to write for publication 
by that unit as a part of their professional duty or produce other copyrightable 
materials, such as audiovisual materials or computer software, may, subject to 
the approval of the Vice Chancellor for Research, adopt rules providing that 
copyright on materials prepared by such faculty members and other employees 
in the course of their professional work for that unit vests in the University and 
not in the author. 

The Intellectual Property Committee can explore the possibilities of commer- 
cial licensing of software developed and owned by the University. Inquiries about 
the possibilities of licensing software should be addressed to the Vice Chancellor 
for Research. 



*A more comprehensive treatment of the University's procedures relating to computer 
software is available in a separately published document entitled "Guidelines and Proce- 
dures for Determining Ownership of Computer Software." 




FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

The course descriptions are planned for the academic years 1987-1988 and 
1988-1989, unless indicated otherwise. Some listed courses may not be taught, 
however, if registration for a course is insufficient, or if faculty or facilities are 
not available. 

Consent of the department is required for all practicum and individual special 
topics or special problems courses as well as internships and thesis or dissertation 
research. In a typical course description, the semester hours of credit, the 
number of actual lecture and laboratory hours of meeting per week and the term 
or terms in which the course is offered are shown in this manner: 2(1-2) F,S,Sum. 
or 1-3 F,S,Sum. 

In the first example, the "2" indicates the number of semester hours credit 
given for satisfactory completion of the course. The "(1-2)" indicates that the 
course meets for one hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory work each week. 
In the second example, the "1-3" indicates that a maximum of three and a 
minimum of one semester hours' credit can be earned. This is to be arranged with 
the instructor. The "F" designates that the course is to be given in the fall 
semester. Likewise, the "S" designates spring and the "Sum.," summer. 



ABBREVIATIONS USED IN COURSE LISTINGS 

Abbreviations used in the course listings are: CI, consent of instructor; PBS, 
Post-Baccalaureate Studies status; grad. standing, admitted to the Graduate 
School; undergrade undergraduate; sr., senior; jr., junior; preq., prerequisite; 
coreq., corequisite; lab., laboratory; lect., lecture; and alt. years, alternate years. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 69 



Courses at the 600-level are not ordinarily open to undergraduates, although 
occasional exceptions are made for senior honor students. 
For 400-level course descriptions, see the Undergraduate Catalog. 



Adult and Community College Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor E.J. Boone, Head 

Professor R. W. Shearon, Associate Head and Graduate Administrator 

Professors: G. L. Carter Jr., J. C. Glass Jr., R. D. Mustian; Extension Professor: D. 
R. Proctor; Professors Emeriti: M. P. Burt, W. L. Carpenter, J. D. George, G. 
Hyatt Jr., M. S. Knowles; Associate Professors: A. Fingeret, R. T. Liles; Visit- 
ing Associate Professors: G. J. Andrews, P. Meyer; Associate Professors Eme- 
riti: W. L. Gragg, E. E. White; Visiting Lecturers: B. E. Fountain Jr., L. M. 
Hoffman, T. A. Tollefson 

The department is a component of both the College of Education and the 
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. It offers programs of study leading to 
the Master of Education, Master of Science and Doctor of Education degrees with 
a major in adult and community college education. The program is directed 
toward administrators, supervisors and teachers in cooperative extension and 
community colleges and other adult education agencies. 

The department's curriculum is interdisciplinary. It is specifically designed to 
help students acquire an integrated conceptual and theoretical framework 
derived from the behavioral and social sciences and education that will equip 
them to plan, administer and effect viable and relevant programs of change with 
individual learners, groups and larger societal aggregates in both formal and 
informal settings. 

Further, the curriculum provides opportunities for students to acquire a high 
level of competence in identifying and diagnosing problematic situations and in 
proposing alternative courses of action and strategy in seeking solutions to prob- 
lems. Cognate fields of study include anthropology, economics, politics, psychol- 
ogy and sociology. 

The department is housed in Ricks Hall and Poe Hall. Graduate students on 
assistantships and internships are provided office space and equipment. Other 
graduate students are provided study space when possible. 

For descriptions of the adult and community college education courses listed 
below, see education. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSE 

ED 478 Extension as Non-formal Education. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or PBS. 
3(3-0) S. 



70 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 500 Community College and Two-year Postsecondary Education. S(S-O) F,S. 

ED 503 The Programming Process in Adult and Community College Education. 

3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 510 Adult Education: History, Philosophy, Contemporary Nature. 3(3-0) F.S. 

ED 537 The Extension and Public Service Function in Higher Education. 3(3-0) 
F.Sum. 

ED 538 Instructional Strategies in Adult and Community College Education. 3(3-0) 
F. 

ED 539 Educational Gerontology. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 543 Adulthood and Learning: The Later Years. 3(3-0) Alt. S. 

ED 559 The Adult Learner. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 

ED 567 Education of Special Adult Populations. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 

ED 579 Concepts and Principles of Evaluation Applied to Non-formal Adult Educa- 
tion. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 585 Qualitative Research in Adult and Community College Education. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 596 Topical Problems in Adult and Community College Education. Credits 
Arranged. F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 600 Organizational Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. 3(3-0) F.Sum. 

ED 601 Administrative Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 

ED 696 Seminar in Adult and Community College Education. 1-3. F.S. 

Agricultural Communications 

AC 590 Special Topics in Agricultural Communications. Preq.: Sr. orgrad. standing. 
1-6. Special Topics may be selected for study in the theoretical approaches to communica- 
tions problems or experimental investigation with instructor guidance. Graduate Staff 

Agricultural Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see education. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 71 



Air Conservation 



The air conservation faculty includes some 50 faculty members representing 
20 departments in four schools. It is the intent of this faculty and the associated 
program to provide training for students in the many disciplines related to air 
conservation. Such areas as air sampling, biological effects, air-quality man- 
agement, sources, meteorology, law and economics and business are all impor- 
tant aspects covered by course offerings and research projects. 

A graduate student desiring to minor in air conservation will have on his or her 
committee a member of the air conservation faculty from outside the individual's 
major department, representing this minor field. While there are no restrictions 
on the major, students minoring in air conservation should have a strong back- 
ground in the life sciences, the physical sciences or engineering. The minor 
program will normally consist of 9 or more credits for the master's degree, 15 or 
more for the doctorate. 

A variety of courses bearing on different aspects of the air conservation prob- 
lem may be taken on this campus, at UNC-Chapel Hill or at Duke. The listing 
below shows relevant courses available at North Carolina State University. For 
courses at Duke and Chapel Hill see the appropriate catalogs. 

Air Pollutants and Their Sources 

CE 576 Atmospheric Pollution. 

Meteorology and Pollutant Transport 

MEA 555 Meteorology of the Biosphere. 

MEA 556 Air Pollution Meteorology. 

MEA 627 Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion. 

Air Sampling and Analysis 

ST 511 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences I. 

ST 515 Experimental Statistics for Engineers. 

CH 517 Physical Methods of Elemental Trace Analysis. 

Effects on Human, Animal and Plant Receptors 

FOR 353 Air Photo Interpretation and Photogrammetry. 
ZO 400 Biological Issues in Human Ecology. 
TOX 515 Environmental Toxicology. 
BO 561 Physiological Ecology. 

Air Quality Management 

MAE 409 Particulate Control in Industrial Atmospheric Pollution. 

WPS 525 Pollution Abatement in Forest Products Industries. 

CHE 535 Engineering Economy in Air Pollution Control Systems. 

MAE 570 Theory of Particulate Collection in Air Pollution Control. 



72 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Air Quality Law and Institutions 

UNI 495 Special Topics in University Studies (Environment and Law). 
PA 511 Public Administration. 

Air Conservation Economics 

EB 401 Economic Analysis for Non-Majors. 
OR 501 Introduction to Operations Research. 
EB 515 Environmental and Resource Policy. 



Communications concerning the air conservation program, including in- 
quiries from students wishing to minor in air conservation, should be directed to 
the Chairman, Air Conservation Faculty, Department of Chemical Engineering, 
P.O. Box 7905, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 
27695-7905. 

Animal Science 
GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. A. Lassiter, Head 

Professor E. E. Jones, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: J. H. Britt, K. R. Butcher, E. V. Caruolo, A. J. Clawson, D. G. 
Davenport, E.J. Eisen, R. W. Harvey, B. H. Johnson, W. L. Johnson, J. R. Jones, 
J. G. Lecce, C. L. Markert, B. T. McDaniel, R. D. Mochrie, B. R. Poulton, A. H. 
Rakes, H. A. Ramsey, 0. W. Robison, F. D. Sargent, J. C. Wilk; Professors 
Emeriti: E. R. Barrick, R. F. Behlow, L. Goode, J. E. Legates, R. M. Myers, I. D. 
Porterfield, F. H. Smith, L. C. Ulberg, G. H. Wise; Associate Professors: R. G. 
Crickenberger, W. J. Croom Jr., K. L. Esbenshade, R. L. McCraw, R. M. 
Petters, J. W. Spears, M. W. Tess, L. W. Whitlow; Associate Professors Emeriti: 
E. U. Dillard, J. J. McNeill; Assistant Professors: J. D. Armstrong, M. T. 
Coffey, K. R. Pond, S. P. Washburn 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professor (USDA): J. C. Burns; Assistant Professor: M. D. Whitacre 

The Department of Animal Science offers programs of graduate study leading 
to the Master of Agriculture, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. Animal science offers an opportunity for training in a diversity of basic 
sciences and the integration of such knowledge into the framework of a living 
system. Students may major not only in animal science but also in any one of the 
following disciplines: biochemistry, genetics, microbiology, nutrition and physi- 
ology. Animal science majors may specialize in one or more of these basic disci- 
plines or in the more applied areas of management and production. The animal 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 73 



science major provides for the student who prefers a multidisciplinary approach. 
Majors in a basic discipline are not only educated in it but have the added 
capability of integrating such knowledge into a living system, i.e., the domestic 
animal. Minors can be obtained in any of the disciplines listed or in a variety of 
other areas. 

Modern laboratories, specialized equipment and many different species of 
animals are available as research tools. A program of course work and a research 
project are developed for each student in accord with one's educational objectives. 
The primary goal is to provide the student with a challenging opportunity to 
develop his or her creative ability so that it may contribute significantly to a 
chosen discipline. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ANS 401 Reproductive Physiology. Preq.: ZO 421. 3(2-3) F. 

ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management. Preq.: ANS 204. 3(2-3) S. 

ANS 403 Swine Management. Preq.: ANS 204. 3(2-3) F. 

ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management. Preq.: ANS 20k- 3(2-3) S. 

ANS 405 Lactation. Preq.: BS 100. 3(2-3) S. 

ANS 406 Sheep Management. Preq.: ANS 204. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. 

ANS 410 Horse Science. Preq.: ANS 310 or CI. 3(2-2) S. 

ANS 411 Breeding and Improvement of Domestic Animals. Preq.: GN 4.11. 3(3-0) F. 

ANS (PO, NTR) 415 Comparative Nutrition. Preq.: CH 220 or both 221 and 223. 3(3-0) 
F. 

ANS (NTR) 419 Human Nutrition in Health and Disease. Preqs.:ANS(NTR, PO)415 
or FS W0, BCH 451. 3(3-0) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ANS 500 Advanced Ruminant Nutrition. Preq.: ANS 204 or ANS 415. 3(3-0) Sum. Alt. 
yrs. Advanced concepts in ruminant nutrition for the practicing agricultural professional. 
Protein, energy, vitamin and mineral nutrition in relationship to the nutritional needs and 
practical feeding of beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep and goats. New developments in feeding 
systems, feed additives and the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders. 

Crickenberger, Croom, Whitlow 

ANS (PHY) 502 Reproductive Physiology of Vertebrates. Preq.: ZO 421. 3(3-0) S. 
Emphasis will be placed on discussions of mechanisms which control the reproductive 
processes. Mechanisms which are species-limited will be compared with those which are 
shared by all species. Current knowledge of some subsystems will be investigated in detail 
while others will be referred to in reviews of well-documented research findings. 

Britt. B. H. Johnson, Petters 

ANS (GN) 508 Genetics of Animal Improvement. Preqs.: GN 411, ST 511. 3(3-0) S. 
Emphasis is placed on the utilization of basic principles of population and quantitative 



74 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



genetics in animal improvement. Factors affecting genie and genotypic frequencies and 
methods of estimating genetic and nongenetic variance, heritabilities and breeding values 
are presented. The roles of mating systems and selection procedures in producing superior 
genetic populations are examined. Robison 

ANS 510 Advanced Livestock Management. Preq.: ANS 402 or ANS 403 or ANS 404. 
3(3-0) S. An advanced study of beef cattle, dairy cattle and swine management practices 
with particular emphasis on input-output relationships and the consequences of alternative 
management decisions. Problem. (Offered on-campus in even-numbered years.) 

Davenport 

ANS (NTR) 516 Quantitative Nutrition. 3(1-6) S. (See nutrition.) 

ANS 520 Tropical Livestock Production. Preq.: Six hours of ANS at 400-level. 3(3-0) F. 
Modern principles of feeding, genetics, forage production and management are applied to 
improvement of meat and dairy animals in tropical, subtropical and high-altitude envir- 
onments. Considers biological and socio-economic constraints to development of livestock 
industry. Discussion of climatic effects on production applies to U. S. conditions and to 
developing tropical countries. W. L. Johnson 

ANS (NTR) 540 Ruminant Physiology and Metabolism. Preqs.: BCH 451 or 551, ZO 
421. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Detailed discussion of the ruminant digestive system, its dependent 
microbial fermentation and the unique aspects of ruminant tissue metabolism. Emphasis is 
given to the understanding of the interdependent relationship between the rumen microb- 
ial fermentation and the host animal's physiology and metabolism. The effects of changes in 
diet and physiological state and their relationship to various digestive and metabolic 
dysfunctions are discussed. Croom, McNeill 

ANS (PHY) 580 Mammalian Endocrine Physiology. Preqs.: BCH 451, ZO 421. 3(3-0) 
F. Alt. yrs. Detailed discussion of the mammalian endocrine system with emphasis on the 
functional aspect, chemistry and mode of action of specific hormones secreted from major 
endocrine glands. Modern biochemical and physiological principles of hormonal integra- 
tions and neuroendocrine integration are examined. B. H. Johnson 

ANS 590 Topical Problems in Animal Science. Maximum 6 F,S. Special problems 
may be selected or assigned in various phases of animal science. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ANS (GN) 603 Population Genetics in Animal Improvement. Preqs.: ST 512, GN 506. 
3(3-0) F. A study of the forces influencing gene frequencies, inbreeding and its effects, and 
alternative breeding plans. Eisen 

ANS (PHY) 604 Experimental Animal Physiology. Preq.: ZO (PHY) 513 or equivalent. 
4(2-4) S. A study of the theories and techniques involved in the use of animals in physiologic 
investigation with special emphasis on the diversity of physiological applications on this 
campus. Caruolo 

ANS (NTR, PO) 605 Mineral Metabolism. Preqs.: ANS (NTR, PO) 1*15 or BCH 551, 
BCH 451 and ZO 1*21. 3(3-0) F. Requirements, function, distribution, absorption, excretion 
and toxicity of minerals in humans and domestic animals. Interactions between minerals 
and other factors affecting mineral metabolism or availability. Emphasis on mechanisms 
associated with mineral functions and the metabolic bases for the development of signs of 
deficiency. Spears 

ANS 606 Animal Biotechnology: Embryo Manipulation. Preq.: ANS 502. 4(1-8) F. Alt. 
yrs. Advanced training and experience in mammalian embryo manipulation including 
techniques of superovulation and embryo recovery, in vitro culture, parthenogenetic acti- 
vation, in vitro fertilization, embryo transfer, embryo aggregation and DNA micro- 
injection. Petters 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 75 



ANS 690 Seminar in Animal Nutrition. Preq.: Consent of seminar leaders. 1(1-0) F,S. 
Orientation in philosophy of research, preparation for research and general research 
methodology. Graduate Staff 

ANS 699 Research in Animal Science. Credits Arranged. F,S. A maximum of six hours 
is allowed toward the master's degree: no limitation on credits in doctorate program. 

Graduate Staff 

For related courses, see: 

BCH 551 General Biochemistry I. 3(3-0) F. 

MB 551 Immunology I. 3(3-0) F. 

NTR 601 Protein and Amino Acid Metabolism. 3(3-0) S. 

NTR 608 Energy Metabolism. 3(3-0) F. 

Anthropology 

For anthropology courses, see sociology and anthropology. 



Architecture 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. P. Burns Jr., Program Director 

Associate Professor L. W. Sanders, Assistant Program Director 

Professors: P. Batchelor, R. H. Clark, C. E. McKinney, M. Pause, G. J. P. Reuer, 
H. Sanoff , V. F. Shogren, E. W. Taylor: Professors Emeriti: G. L. Bireline Jr., J. 
H. Cox, H. H. Harris, H. L. Kamphoefner, D. R. Stuart; Associate Professors: F. 
C. Harmon, J. W. Place, J. P. Rand, P. Tesar; Visiting Associate Professor: E. F. 
Harris Jr.; Associate Professor Emeritus: D. W. Barnes Jr.; Assistant Profes- 
sors: F. A. Rifki, J. 0. Tector; Adjunct Lecturer: T. C. Howard 

The Master of Architecture program prepares students to assume responsible 
professional roles in architecture. Learning goals for students in the program 
include 1) developing exceptional competence in architectural design, 2) build- 
ing a base of knowledge and skills necessary for professional activity, 3) develop- 
ing a commitment to professional values and responsibilities. 4) discovering the 
variety of career roles in practice and related fields, and 5) developing as auto- 
nomous individuals, willing to assume responsibility for a lifetime of intellectual 
and creative growth. 

Students encounter architectural problems at a variety of scales, requiring 
analytic, conceptual and developmental abilities. The design studio is the focus of 
this activity, enabling students to test ideas and theories about design in the 
context of both "real life" and idealized problems. The final studio is devoted to a 
self-initiated, detailed architectural project that is carried out under the gui- 
dance of the student's graduate advisory committee. 



76 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Other course work supplements and amplifies these experiences. A rich var- 
iety of courses is available within the Architecture Department in urban and 
community design, architectural conservation, management, professional prac- 
tice and building technology. A distinctive characteristic of the program is its 
context within the School of Design, which offers the additional perspectives of 
landscape architecture, product design and visual design. Course work may also 
be taken throughout North Carolina State University and at nearby University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University. The program's flexible 
curriculum offers the student considerable freedom to individualize his or her 
plan of study, based on personal, educational and professional goals. 

The Master of Architecture is a first professional degree accredited by the 
National Architectural Accrediting Board. As such, it satisfies educational 
requirements for professional certification established by the various states and 
the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards. The department also 
offers a parallel 4 + 1 Bachelor of Architecture program which provides similar 
qualification for professional certification. 

The majority of recent graduates have chosen to enter private architectural 
practice, undertaking the rich professional challenges it offers. While acknowl- 
edging the primacy of the practice orientation, the Master of Architecture pro- 
gram enlarges the professional framework to include alternative, nontraditional 
career roles as well. 

Students are encouraged to exercise initiative and responsibility in realizing 
their personal educational goals. Student independence is seen as instrumental in 
helping to shape not only decision-making capabilities but future leadership 
potential as well. 

The Department of Architecture offers three tracks to the Master of Architec- 
ture degree. Track 1 is for applicants with a four-year undergraduate degree in 
architecture and may be completed in two years of full-time study. Track 2 is for 
applicants holding a five-year NAAB-accredited Bachelor of Architecture 
degree and normally requires three semesters in residence. Track 3 is for stu- 
dents with degrees in fields other than architecture. This normally requires four 
semesters of preparatory work before entering the final two-year program of 
graduate study. Some applicants with design-related academic or professional 
experimence may be able to complete the preparatory work in less than four 
semester; each case is evaluated individually. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSE 

ARC 400 Architecture Studio. Preq.: DF 102 or written approval ofdept. head. May not 
be taken more than six times. 6(0-9) F,S. 

ARC 403 Pre-Graduate Architectural Design (Series). Track 3 M.Arch. students only. 
Maximum of 2U hours 6(0-12) F,S. 

ARC 441 History of Contemporary Architecture. Preq.: Junior standing or DN Ul, 
1U2. 3(3-0) F. 

ARC 447 Ideas in American Architecture 1: 1865-1893. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(3-0) F. 
Alt. yrs. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 77 



ARC 448 Ideas in American Architecture II: 1893-1918. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. 

ARC 449 Urban Form and Structure. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(3-0) F. 

ARC 451 Illumination and Design. Preq.: ARC 253. 3(2-2) S. Alt. yrs. 

ARC 452 Environmental Control Systems and Design. Preq.: ARC 253. 3(2-2) S. Alt 
yr& 

ARC 457 Architectural Construction Systems. Preq.: DN 25U- 3(2-3) S. 

ARC 494 Internship in Architecture. Preqs.: Jr. standing in Architecture; 3.0 or better 
GPA; written approval ofdept. head. 3-6 CH. 

ARC 495 Independent Study in Architecture. Preq.: Jr. standing in Architecture; 3.0 
or better GPA; approval ofdept. head. 1-3 CH. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ARC 501 Professional Architecture Studio I. Preqs.: BEDA degree or equivalent and 
CI; Coreq.: ARC 510. 6(0-12) F,S. Design studio investigations aimed at the development of 
an understanding of the major issues confronting the contemporary architect and at the 
expanding of problem solving abilities in architectural design. 

ARC 502 Professional Architecture Studio II. Preqs.: ARC 501; ARC 510 and CI. 

6(0-12) F.S. Design investigations aimed at the development of an understanding of the 
major issues confronting the contemporary architect and at the expanding of problem 
solving abilities in architectural design. This is an individualized, final project studio. 

ARC 521, 522 Advanced Architectural Structures I, II. Preq.: (521) DN 352; (522) 
ARC 521. 3(3-0) F,S. Gravity and non-gravity loads on structures; comparative behavior of 
structural materials; comparative behavior of simple structural systems; approximate and 
exact analysis procedures as applied to systems; principles of approximate and exact 
design in timber, steel and reinforced concrete; architectural/structural/mechanical com- 
patibility in systems; basic principles of foundation analyses and design. 

ARC 531, 532 Advanced Building Technology I, II. Preqs.: DN 253, 25h. 2(1-3) F.S. A 
synthesis of studies in building science undertaken in previous courses. Material assem- 
blies in practical applications, dimensional characteristics of mechanical and construction 
systems for buildings, and special projects in selected areas of building science. 

ARC 542 Investigations in Recent World Architecture. Preq.: CI. 3(2-1) F. A lecture- 
seminar course intended to provide a description and analysis of recent developments in 
architectural design through an examination of projects by many of the world's most 
important architects. Primary emphasis will be placed on emerging design concepts and 
theories as expressed in the built architecture and the visionary proposals of the past two 
decades. 

ARC 543 Analysis of Precedent. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(0-3) S. The investigation 
of architectural elements, relationships, and ordering ideas through a comparative graphic 
examination and analysis of the work of architects. Emphasis on buildings as physical 
artifacts. 



78 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



ARC 544 Architectural Conservation. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. in SOD or grad. 
standing. S(S-O) S. Alt. yrs. An examination of the many dimensions of architectural 
conservation and/or preservation as a significant aspect of architectural practice. Histori- 
cal evolution, regulatory and economic factors, technology and pertinent design issues will 
be explored as foundations for individual case studies by class members of selected adaptive 
use, rehabilitation and restoration projects. 

ARC 546 Theory of Building Types. Preq.: Two ARC studios. 3(3-0) F. Typology in its 
theoretical implications and practical applications in architecture. Analysis and documen- 
tation of selected building types in their historical evolution. Graphic identification of type 
characteristics. 

ARC 551 Design Methods and Programming. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) F. An 
intensive study of a part of the design process involving the social and behavioral needs of 
the users through disciplined methods of data collection, analysis, organization, communi- 
cation and evaluation. Emphasis is placed upon the role of programming in the environ- 
mental design field and variety of applications used in the profession. 

ARC 561 The Practice of Architecture. 3(3-0) F. A lecture course which examines the 
practice of architecture, with emphasis given to both normative and emerging procedures 
in the private architectural firm. The role and function of the practicing architect, legal 
and regulatory conditions, the nature of professional services, office management and 
project management processes will be given special attention. 

ARC 562 Project Processes in Architecture. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. A 
course which examines the processes of project delivery in architectural practice from 
initiation to completion of projects. Lectures and case studies of current projects will 
provide the means to explore the nature of architectural services involved, the roles of 
participants and the creative and technical issues which must be resolved. 

ARC 570 Theory of Urban Form. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. 3(3-0)F.Alt. yrs. Theory 
of urban form examines the morphology of cities and their component parts, emphasizing 
the formal properties of urban space and structure. The first part of the course examines 
the descriptive properties of cities, while the second part deals with the analysis of parts of 
cities. 

ARC 571 Urban Housing. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. 3(3-0) S. Interrelationships 
between housing and the form and structure of cities. Housing design as a function of 
economic, public policy, social and technological influences. Emphasis on the physical form 
of housing in the latter half of the twentieth century. 

ARC 572 Urban Programming. Preq.: Graduate standing or CI. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. This 
course is designed to reveal the programmatic requirements of communities in terms of 
density, size, physical structure and evolutionary characteristics. It is based on the analysis 
of social and economic characteristics of urban populations and provides the designer and 
planner with estimates of the projected demand for facilities and services. 

ARC 573 Environmental Perception. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) S. An intensive 
review of the design research literature that emphasizes people's interaction with the 
physical environment. Various techniques for measuring human response to the environ- 
ment will be explored to permit students to develop and analyze their own research 
projects. 

ARC 574 Place and Place Making. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) F. A seminar- 
lecture course which examines the definitions, concepts and emergent research findings 
that are useful in explaining the human sense of place. Particular emphasis is placed upon 
those physical aspects and relationships which influence this sense of place and over which 
the designer has some control. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 79 



ARC 575 Participatory Design in Architecture. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. An examination of the theories and methods pertaining to the participatory design 
process. The course will probe the nature of advocacy design and examine successful 
projects in the U. S. and abroad that define a social role for architects. 

ARC 581 Conceptual Issues in Architecture and Design I. Preq.: Advanced under- 
grad. or grad. standing. 3(0-3) F. An examination of current issues in American and 
Western society and their relation to the activities and goals of architects and designers. 

ARC 582 Conceptual Issues in Architecture and Design II. Preq.: Advanced under- 
grade or grad. standing. 3(0-3) S. An investigation into issues and values currently held by 
participating students and their relation to an anticipated career in architecture and 
design.. 

ARC 591 Special Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F.S. Seminars on subjects of 
current interest in design which are presented by persons not part of the regular faculty. 

ARC 592 Special Topics. Preq.: Grad. standing. 2-3 F,S. Topics of current interest to the 
programs in the School of Design offered by faculty in the School. Subjects offered under 
this number are normally used to test and develop new courses. 

ARC 595 Independent Study. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 Max. 6. F,S,Sum. Special 
problems and projects in various aspects of architecture developed under the direction of an 
architecture faculty member on a tutorial basis. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ARC 600 Advanced Architectural Design (Series). Preq.: Grad. standing. 6(0-12) F,S. 
Advanced studies in architectural design. Projects deal with various aspects of building 
design, urban design and community design in a comprehensive and integrative manner. 

ARC 691, 692 Special Topics in Architecture. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-6 F,S. An 
investigation of special topics in architecture of particular interest to advanced students 
under the direction of a faculty member on a tutorial basis. Credits and content will vary 
with the needs of students. 

ARC 698 Project Studio in Architecture. Preq.: 18 hrs. of ARC 600. 6(0-12) F,S. Final 
project for graduate students supervised by members of their graduate advisory com- 
mittee. 

Artificial Intelligence 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: R. E. Funderlic, H. E. Schaffer, A. L. Tharp; Associate Professors: A. 
C. Chao, M. G. Joost, H. D. Levin, R. C. Luo, W. J. Rasdorf, R. D. Rodman. W. E. 
Snyder; Visiting Associate Professor: J. A. Bowen; Assistant Professors: D. R. 
Bahler. E. L. Fisher, E. T. Sanii, N. F. Williamson 

Artificial Intelligence is the branch of computer science concerned with 
designing computer systems which exhibit the characteristics normally asso- 
ciated with intelligence in human behavior, such as understanding language, 
learning, reasoning, solving problems, and so on. At NCSU, Artificial Intelli- 
gence is an interdisciplinary field, with faculty from several departments 
engaged in fundamental research and applications. 



80 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The university offers courses of study leading to a minor in Artificial Intelli- 
gence as part of the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. This 
option is available to all graduate students except those in Computer Studies, who 
can choose Artificial Intelligence as an interest area. 

To fulfill the academic requirements for a minor in Artificial Intelligence, 
each master's student must successfully complete at least three, and each doc- 
toral student, six of the courses in the Artificial Intelligence curriculum. One of 
the courses must be CSE 511, Artificial Intelligence I. Other courses offered as 
part of the Artificial Intelligence curriculum include: CSE 502 Computational 
Linguistics; CSE 602 Computational Semantics; CSE 611 Artificial Intelligence 
II; CSE(ECE) 559 Pattern Recognition; ECE(CSE) 659 Computer Vision; CSE 
(CSC,ECE,IE) 575 Voice Communication Systems; CSE(CSC,ECE,IE) 675 
Advances in Voice Input/Output Communication Systems; IE 520 Industrial 
Robotics. There are also a range of special topics courses covering subjects such 
as Knowledge Engineering, Fuzzy Reasoning, Knowledge Representation, Arti- 
ficial Intelligence Applications to CAD, and Artificial Intelligence in Manufac- 
turing. Other subjects can be added to an individual student's course of study at 
the discretion of his or her committee. 

Graduate students in Computer Studies who select Artificial Intelligence as an 
interest area are subject to the same academic requirements that define the 
Artificial Intelligence minor for students outside of the Computer Studies 
Department. 

Biochemistry 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor P. G. Agris, Head 

Associate Professor: J. A. Knopp, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: F. B. Armstrong, H. R. Horton, J. S. Kahn, I. S. Longmuir, W. L. 
Miller, E. C. Sisler, E. C. Theil, S. B. Tove; Assistant Professor: E. S. Maxwell 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: L. W. Aurand, E. E. Jones, H. E. Swaisgood 

The field of biochemistry applies and extends the concepts of chemistry and 
physics to the investigation of biological problems. The Department of Biochem- 
istry offers courses of study leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. 

A student entering graduate study in biochemistry should have a bachelor's 
degree in biochemistry, chemistry or a related physical or biological science. In 
any case, the undergraduate program of study should have included a minimum 
of two semesters of organic chemistry, two semesters of physical chemistry, one 
semester of introductory biochemistry and one semester of qualitative organic 
analysis. New students entering degree programs take placement examinations 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 81 



in organic and physical chemistry to determine their level of competence in these 
areas. Students who lack undergraduate courses considered essential for gradu- 
ate study in biochemistry may be admitted to the graduate program, provided 
the deficiencies are corrected early in their graduate work. 

Courses in general and experimental biochemistry are required as part of 
programs leading to advanced degrees in biochemistry. Other courses in bio- 
chemistry and related areas are required as recommended by the student's 
advisory committee. In addition, the student is expected to participate regularly 
in seminars and obtain teaching experience. Completion of a thesis based on 
original research is required for both the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees, and a reading knowledge of one foreign language is required 
for the doctoral degree. Research programs are currently being conducted in 
biochemical genetics, enzyme structures and mechanisms, biochemical aspects 
of toxicology, regulation of metabolism, fluorescence spectroscopy of proteins 
and nucleic acids, photosynthesis and electron transport, molecular interactions 
of ethylene in plants and developmental biochemistry of plants, lipid and mem- 
brane metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, oxygen transport mechanisms, 
developmental changes in red blood cells and iron metabolism, bio-oxidation of 
lipids and foods, immobilization of enzymes and biomolecules, mechanisms of 
hormone action, disulfide bond formation in proteins and peptides, structure and 
function of nucleic acids, and involvement of sn RNP in autoimmune disease. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BCH 551 General Biochemistry I. Preq.: Three years of chemistry, including CH 223 or 
equivalent and one semester of introductory biochemistry (BCH U51 or equivalent one semes- 
ter of physical chemistry would be helpful. 3(3-0) F. Protein structure and function, carbohy- 
drate metabolism and the production of chemical energy, lipids and membrane structure 
and function, nucleic acids and protein metabolism. Horton 

BCH 552 Experimental Biochemistry. Preqs.: CH 223; CH 315 recommended; Preq. or 
Coreq.: BCH 551. 3(1-6) F. An advanced laboratory designed to give students practical 
experiences in purification and quantitative characterization of enzymes and nucleic acids. 
Studies with carbohydrates and membrane lipids will also be included. Miller 

BCH (PHY) 553 Physiological Biochemistry. Preq.: BCH 551. 3(3-0) S. Application of 
biochemical methods to the elucidation of the function of whole organisms. A. Biochemistry 
of 1) blood, 2) water, electrolyte, acid-base balance, 3) renal function, 4) muscle metabolism, 
5) central nervous system, 6) autonomic nervous system, 7) endocrine system. B. Biochemis- 
try of adaptation to environment: 1) high and low Po 2 , 2) hot and cold, 3) wet and dry, 4) 
pollution. Longmuir 

BCH 554 Radioisotope Techniques in Biology. Preq.: BCH 1*51 or CI. 2(1-3) Sum. 
Theory and application of radioisotope techniques used in biology. The different modes of 
radioactivity are correlated with methods of measurement. Emphasis on use and limita- 
tions of various instruments and techniques and on their application to research problems. 

Sisler 

BCH 555 Plant Biochemistry. Preq.: BCH 551 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. * The 
basic biochemistry of plants. Basic constituents of plants, their metabolic interrelation- 
ships and their regulation: cell wall structure, carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids, 
lipids, photosynthesis, respiration, secondary plant products, nitrogen metabolism, phytoa- 
lexins and plant hormones. Sisler 

*See department for specific year. 



82 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



BCH 557 Introductory Enzyme Kinetics. Preqs.:BCH551 and MA 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F. 
Alt. yrs. * Basic principles of chemical kinetics are applied to develop enzyme kinetics. 
Limitations of the Michaelis equation are considered in light of the general rate equation. 
Transient state kinetics are then considered. Inhibition and activation. pH functions, 
effects of temperature, and elucidation of mechanisms follow. The kinetics of allosteric site 
interactions and of conformational forms complete the course. Main 

BCH (GN) 561 Biochemical and Microbial Genetics. Preqs.: BCH 1+51 or 551, GN All 
or 505, MB U01 or equ iralent. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. * A study of the development of the fields of 
biochemical and microbial genetics, emphasizing both techniques and concepts currently 
used in molecular research. Includes lectures and discussions of current research 
publications. Armstrong 

BCH 590 Special Topics in Biochemistry. Preq.: BCH U51 or equivalent. Credits 
arranged, Max. 3 F,S,Sum. The study of topics of special interest by small groups of 
students instructed by members of the faculty. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BCH 651 Physical Biochemistry. Preq.: BCH 551. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. * Structural and 
physical properties of biological macromolecules and the application of spectroscopic 
methods to their study. Knopp 

BCH 652 Structures and Interactions of Biological Macromolecules. Preqs.: BCH 
551, CH h31 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. * Theory and interpretation of physical 
measurements related to structures and interactions of biological macromolecules, 
emphasizing hydrodynamic methods, thermodynamic methods, ligand interactions at 
equilibrium and conformational equilibria. Swaisgood 

BCH 653 Biochemistry of Hormone Action. Preq.: BCH 551. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. * Well 
defined models of steroid and protein hormone action are studied via lectures, assigned 
readings and discussions. Students add breadth to the course and depth to their own 
understanding by searching the literature and writing or lecturing about a particular 
hormone of their own choosing. Miller 

BCH 655 General Biochemistry II. Preq.: BCH 551. 3(3-0) F. A continuation of BCH 
551 with emphasis on enzyme kinetics, allosterism and cooperativity, micelles and biologi- 
cal membranes, bioenergetics and metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Tove 

BCH 657 General Biochemistry III. Preq.: BCH 551. 3(3-0) S. A continuation of BCH 
551 with emphasis on enzyme mechanisms, relation of enzyme structure to catalytic 
mechanisms, and specificity, structure and function of nucleic acids, metabolism of nitro- 
genous biomolecules and modes of metabolic regulation. Maxwell 

BCH (GN) 658 Nucleic Acids: Structure and Function. Preq.: BCH 657. 3(3-0) F. Alt 
yrs. * Structure-function relationships of nucleic acids and nucleic acid-protein complexes, 
including the physical biochemistry of nucleotides, polynucleotides, DNA, RNA and pro- 
tein as they relate to the biological processes of replication, transcription and translation. 
Current techniques used to analyze nucleic acid structure and function. Maxwell 

BCH (CH) 659 Natural Products. 3(3-0) F. (See chemistry.) 

BCH 691 Seminar in Biochemistry. 1(1-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 

BCH 695 Special Topics in Biochemistry. Preq.: Grad. standing in BCH. Credits 
Arranged. F,S,Sum. Critical study of special problems and selected topics of current 
interest in biochemistry and related fields. Graduate Staff 

BCH 699 Biochemical Research. Credits Arranged, F,S,Sum. Graduate Staff 

*See department for specific year. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 83 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. H. Ruff, Head 

Professor R. S. Sowell, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: C. F. Abrams, H. D. Bowen, B. K. Huang, F. J. Humenik, E. G. 
Humphries, W. H. Johnson, G. J. Kriz, W. F. McClure, R. P. Rohrbach, L. M. 
Safley Jr., R. W. Skaggs, R. E. Sneed, L. F. Stikeleather, C. W. Suggs, P. W. 
Westerman, D. H. Willits, E. H. Wiser, J. H. Young; Professors (USDA):J. W. 
Dickens, T. B. Whitaker; Extension Professor: J . C. Barker; Prof essors Emeriti: 
D. H. Howells, F. J. Hassler; Associate Professor: G. R. Baughman; Visiting 
Associate Professor: M. D. Smolen; Assistant Professors: R. W. Bottcher, C. G. 
Bowers Jr.; Senior Researcher: S. C. Mohapatra 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: D. D. Hamann, A. E. Hassan, V. A. Jones; Associate Professor: K. R. 
Swartzel 

The Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering offers programs 
of study for the Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Biological 
and Agricultural Engineering degrees. 

In the Master of Science program emphasis is placed on mathematics and 
theory as the unifying link between otherwise divergent fields of knowledge in 
the biological and physical sciences and as prerequisites to effective engineering 
advances in biological and agricultural areas. As the student acquires compe- 
tence in the advanced methods of science, he or she applies knowledge by conduct- 
ing an original research investigation and by writing and defending a thesis. 

Study for the Doctor of Philosophy degree builds on the Master of Science 
program with additional formal study followed by a period of independent 
dissertation research. 

Current departmental research projects available for graduate student partic- 
ipation include instrumentation to measure quality and composition of agricul- 
tural products, bioengineering properties as related to animal and human medi- 
cine, safety and health of agricultural workers, mechanization and automation of 
horticultural crop production (cucumbers, sweetpotatoes, blueberries and 
grapes), post-harvest processing and storage of agricultural commodities, envir- 
onmental control of greenhouses, improved systems for field crop production, 
crop response to drainage, total water management for Coastal Plains and Tide- 
water Region soils, hydrologic/water quality modeling of sediment and chemical 
movement, optimum production efficiency of poultry and animal housing sys- 
tems, animal waste as nutrient and energy resources, and expert systems and 
simulation modeling for management decisions. 



84 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

For those interested primarily in a broadened background of engineering 
science and technology— without the thesis requirement— the Master of Biologi- 
cal and Agricultural Engineering program permits a wide selection from a 
variety of advanced courses. While this program is primarily for those intending 
to terminate graduate study at the master's level, a student may, with depart- 
mental approval, develop a plan of study under this program which leads to study 
for the doctorate. 

Graduate students have access to modern well-equipped research laboratories, 
controlled environment test chambers, excellent computing facilities and a 
research shop manned by competent mechanics. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

BAE 411 Farm Power and Machinery. Preqs.:BAE211, CHlOl, PY211 or 221. 3(2-3) 

S. 

BAE 461 Analysis of Agricultural Systems. Preqs.: MA 1U or 112, EB 212. 3(2-2) F. 

BAE 462 Functional Design of Field Machines. Preq.: BAE 361; Coreq.: ST 361. 3(2-3) 

S. 

BAE (CHE) 465 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. Preqs.: MA 202 or 212 or 

PY 212 or 208. 3(3-0) S. 

BAE 471 Soil and Water Engineering. Preqs.: BS 100, SSC 200, MAE 308. U(3-2) F. 

BAE 481 Agricultural Structures and Environment. Preqs.: BAE 3U2, MAE 31U- 
4(8-8) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BAE 552 Instrumentation for Agricultural Research and Processing. Preqs.: EE 
331, MA 301. 2(1-3) F. Theory and application of primary sensing elements and transduc- 
ers. Generalized performance characteristics and the use of standards. Use of specialized 
measurement systems for agricultural research and processing including an introduction 
to correlation and power spectral density measurements. McClure 

BAE (CE, MB) 570 Sanitary Microbiology. 3(2-3) S. (See civil engineering.) 

BAE (CE) 578 Agricultural Waste Management. Preq.: Grad. or advanced undergrad. 
standing. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. A study of agricultural and associated processing wastes. 
Special laboratory techniques required for the characterization of these wastes will be 
emphasized. Principles and examples considered will be utilized to develop waste man- 
agement and non-destructive waste utilization systems that are integral to the total 
operation. Safley 

BAE (FS) 585 Food Rheology. Preqs.: FS 331 or MAE 3 U. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. Principles 
and methods for measuring rheological properties. Theories of elastic, viscous, viscoelastic 
and viscoplastic behavior and relationships to food texture and commodity damage during 
harvest, handling and processing. Influence of time, composition and processing on rheo- 
logical properties. Hamann 

BAE 590 Special Problems. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing in biological and agricultural 
engineering. Credits Arranged. Each student will select a subject on which to do research 
and write a technical report on the results. The individual may choose a subject pertaining 
to his or her particular interest in any area of study in biological and agricultural 
engineering. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 85 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BAE 654 Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics in Bioengineering. Preq.: MA 511. 3(3- 
0) S. Alt. yrs. Generalized classical thermodynamics is extended by'Onsager's relations to 
provide a theoretical basis for analyzing the energetics of systems that include life pro- 
cesses. Topics illustrate applications to special systems including isothermal diffusion and 
sedimentation, membrane permeability, transport processes in continuous systems and 
systems with temperature gradients. Graduate Staff 

BAE 661 Analysis of Function and Design of Biological and Physical Systems. Preq.: 
CI. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. Mathematical and analytical techniques and principles essential in 
the analysis and design of machines and systems which encompass both the biological and 
the physical domains and their interfaces. Analytical treatment of physical and biological 
systems and the functional analysis of machine components are studied to bridge the gap 
be&$.tween theories and applications. Control systems synthesis and design are treated 
with emphasis on quantitative dynamic relations be&$.tween elements and system 
response using transfer function and computer simulation techniques. Graduate Staff 

BAE (SSC) 671 Theory of Drainage— Saturated F\ow.Preq.: MA 301. 3(3-0) F. Alt. 
yrs. Physical concepts and properties of fluids and porous media are discussed in relation to 
soil-water movement. The fundamental laws and equations governing saturated flow in 
porous media are derived and discussed. Mathematical solutions of steady-state and tran- 
sient flow equations are analyzed to determine their applicability to drainage problems. 
Analogs and models of particular drainage problems are considered. Skaggs 

BAE (SSC) 674 Theory of Drainage— Unsaturated Flow. Preq.: BAE 671 or equival- 
ent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Forces involved and theories utilized in unsaturated flow of porous 
media are discussed in relation to soil-water movement. Steady-state and transient unsatu- 
rated flow equations for horizontal and vertical moisture movement are developed and 
solved. The solutions are applied to present day laboratory and field technology. Molecular 
diffusion and hydrodynamic dispersion are considered in light of current tracing 
techniques. Skaggs 

BAE 690 Special Topics. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-U. A study of topics in the special fields 
of interest of graduate students under the direction of the graduate faculty. 

Graduate Staff 

BAE 695 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing in BAE. 1(1-0) F,S. Elaboration of the subject 
areas, techniques and methods peculiar to professional interest through presentations of 
personal and published works; opportunity for students to present and critically defend 
ideas, concepts and inferences. Discussions to point up analytical solutions and analogies 
between problems in biological and agricultural engineering and other technologies, and to 
present the relationship of biological and agricultural engineering to the socio-economic 
enterprise. Graduate Staff 

BAE 699 Research in Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Preq.: Grad. stand- 
ing in BAE. Credits Arranged. Performance of a paticular investigation of concern to 
biological and agricultural engineering. The study will begin with the selection of a 
problem and culminate with the presentation of a thesis. Graduate Staff 

Biological Sciences 

Professor C. F. Lytle, Teaching Coordinator 

There is no separate graduate major in the biological sciences, but both Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered in several life science 
departments and programs of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Also, 



86 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

non-thesis Master of Life Sciences degrees are offered by several departments 
and programs for students who wish to emphasize course work in a graduate 
program. Master of Life Sciences degrees may be appropriate for students who 
are already working or plan to work in a professional capacity in business, 
industry or government agencies rather than to continue to the doctorate. These 
degrees are not necessarily terminal, however, and successful students may be 
able to proceed to other advanced degrees. 

Several interdisciplinary courses applicable to several graduate programs are 
offered by the Biological Sciences Interdepartmental Program. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSE 

BS 491 Seminar on Professional Development in Biological Sciences. 1(1-0) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BS 510 Advanced Biology for Secondary Teachers. Preq.: Two years of college biology. 
6(U-6) Sum. A comprehensive review of important principles and concepts of biology for 
secondary teachers preparing to teach advanced placement biology. Contemporary topics 
in biology are emphasized; extensive laboratory and field work are included. 

Graduate Staff 

BS 590 Special Problems in Biological Instrumentation. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S. Basic 
components of spectrophotometers including light sources, dispersing devices, detectors 
and read-out methods; theoretical and practical aspects of electron microscopy; basics of 
analog and digital computing methods and applications of computers to biological 
research; methods of separation and identification of bio-polymers; principles of measure- 
ment; the application of electronics in biological measuring and sensing devices; and 
human cytological techniques. Course consists of five-week modules (sections) devoted to 
specific types of instrumentation. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BS 605 Biological Scanning Electron Microscopy. Preq.: Grad. standing with some 
biological background. 2(1-2) S. Theory and application of scanning electron microscopy, 
including specimen preparation, microscope alignment and operation, performance evalua- 
tion, interpretation of problems and darkroom technique. (Limited to 8 students with Drior 
approval of instructor.) Graduate Staff 

BS 610 Biological Transmission Electron Microscopy. Preq.: Grad. standing with 
some biological background. 3(2-3) F. Theoretical and practical aspects of transmission 
electron microscopy, including microscope alignment and use, performance evaluation, 
interpretation of problems and darkroom techniques. (Limited to 8 students with prior 
approval of instructor.) Graduate Staff 

BS 611 Ultramicrotomy for Life Sciences. Preqs.: BS 610, grad. standing. 2(l-h) S. An 
intensive laboratory course covering sample preparative techniques for transmission elec- 
tron microscopy, including tissue preparation, thick sectioning, staining and ultramicrot- 
omy. (Limited to 8 students with prior approval of instructor.) Graduate Staff 

BS 690 Seminar in Cell Biology. Preqs.: Grad. standing, background in biology or 
chemistry. 1(1-0) S. A topical appraisal of current literature in selected areas of cell biology 
through presentations and discussions by students, faculty and visiting scientists. 

Graduate Staff 

BS 696 Topics in Biological Ultrastructure. Preq.: Grad. standing (background prefer- 
ably in biology). 1(1-0) F. A survey of the ultrastructure of living organisms from viruses to 
higher plants and animals by means of illustrated lectures. The changes in fine structure 
associated with differentiating cells and with cells in various metabolic states are 
examined. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 87 

Biomathematics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. L. Solomon, Administrative Coordinator 

Professor H. R. van der Vaart, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: H. J. Gold, K. H. Pollock; Adjunct Professor: M. W. Anderson; Profes- 
sor Emeritus: R. J. Monroe; Assistant Professors: S. P. Ellner, C. E. Smith 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

Professors: J . W. Bishir, T.Johnson, G. Namkoong, H. E. Schaffer, J. F. Selgrade, 
R. E. Stinner; Associate Professor: L. A. Real; Assistant Professor: G. G. Wil- 
kerson; Assistant Professor (USDA): S. M. Schneider 

Biomathematics is the development and application of mathematical methods 
for the study of biological systems. The focus is the modeling process, which is the 
matching of the biological and physical structure of the system being studied to 
the mathematical description. 

Students pursuing degrees in biomathematics can choose to emphasize (1) the 
development of mathematical modeling methodology as opposed to the applica- 
tion of that methodology, (2) the mathematical sciences, by taking advantage of 
the diverse offering in statistics, mathematics, computer science and operations 
research, or (3) the biological sciences, by fashioning a program which takes 
advantage of the courses offered by individual biological science departments or 
interdepartmental programs such as ecology, physiology, nutrition, wildlife 
biology and toxicology. 

Furthermore, work in biomathematics varies from the study of general biolog- 
ical theory (e.g., population dynamics, feedback regulation in enzyme systems) to 
specific applications (e.g., pollution of a specific river system). Most research has 
both elements. Finally, the modeling of biological systems often requires the 
scholarly resources of several disciplines and thus is characterized by interdisci- 
plinary collaboration. The modeling serves to integrate the contributions of the 
various areas and to provide a means by which the collaborators communicate. 

Applicants to the program are expected to have either a B.S. in biology with 
evidence of aptitude and interest in mathematics or a B.S. in a mathematical area 
with evidence of aptitude and interest in biology. All students are expected to 
have had advanced calculus, linear algebra and general biology. Deficiencies in 
these areas should be remedied during the first year. 

The Biomathematics graduate program is administered as a division within 
the Department of Statistics, with associate faculty drawn from several other 
departments. Further information may be found in the description for the 
Department of Statistics. A brochure is available which describes the bio- 
mathematics degree requirements and research interests of the faculty. 



88 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BMA 567 Modeling of Biological Systems. Preq.: MA 112. 4(3-2) S. Alt. yrs. An intro- 
duction to quantitative modeling in biology. Use of Forrester diagrams, probabilistic and 
deterministic description of dynamic processes, development of model equations, simula- 
tion methods and criteria for model evaluation. Examination of current literature dealing 
with application of models and simulation in biology. Individual and class modeling 
projects. Ellner 

BMA (MA, ST) 571 Biomathematics I. Preq.: Advanced calculus, reasonable back- 
ground in biology or CI. 3(3-0) F. The role of theory construction and model building in the 
developmentof experimental science. The historical development of mathematical theories 
and models for the growth of one-species populations (logistic and off-shoots), including 
considerations of age distributions (matrix models, Leslie and Lopez; continuous theory, 
renewal equation). Some of the more elementary theories on the growth of organisms (von 
Bertalanffy and others; allometric theories; cultures grown in a chemostat). Mathematical 
theories of two and more species systems (predator-prey, competition, symbosis; leading up 
to present-day research), and discussion of some similar models for chemical kinetics. Much 
emphasis is placed on scrutiny of the biological concepts as well as of the mathematical 
structure of the models in order to uncover both weak and strong points of the models 
discussed. Mathematical treatment of the differential equations in these models stresses 
qualitative and graphical aspects, as well as certain aspects of discretization. Difference 
equation models. van der Vaart 

BMA (MA, ST) 572 Biomathematics II. Preqs.: BMA 571, elementary probability the- 
ory. 3(3-0) S. Continuation of topics of BMA 571. Some more advanced mathematical 
techniques concerning nonlinear differential equations of the types encountered in BMA 
571: several concepts of stability, asymptotic directions, Liapunov functions; different 
time-scales. Comparison of deterministic and stochastic models for several biological prob- 
lems including birth and death processes. Discussion of various other applications of 
mathematics to biology, some recent research. van der Vaart 

BMA 591 Special Topics. Preq.: CI. Maximum 3. F,S,Sum. Directed readings, problem 
sets, written and oral reports as dictated by need and interest of student; new 500-level 
courses during the developmental phase. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BMA (OR) 611 System Modeling Theory. Preqs.: MA 405; MA 421 or ST 421; linear 
systems (e.g., BMA 572 or IE 522 or OR 531). 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. System concepts and 
modeling processes. Objectives include the following: develop understanding of the model- 
ing process; develop and improve skills in system modeling; provide basis for accessing 
research literature. Topics include: graph theory and system structure; system morphisms 
and representation of system dynamics; sensitivity and model validation; models in scien- 
tific theory compared with decision-related modeling. Examples from a broad spectrum of 
application areas. Gold 

BMA 691 Advanced Special Topics. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S,Sum. Directed readings, prob- 
lem sets, written and oral reports as dictated by need and interest of student; new 600-level 
courses during the development phase (currently includes courses in stochastic modeling 
and biophysical theory). Graduate Staff 

BMA 694 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Graduate students in biomathe- 
matics are expected to attend through most of their residence period. Graduate Staff 

BMA 699 Research. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 89 

Biotechnology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor H. E. Swaisgood, Chairman 

Professors: F. B. Armstrong, G. C. Bewley, H.-m. Chang, W. J. Dobrogosz, P. B. 
Carter, B. Hammerberg, H. R. Horton, B. H. Johnson, T. W. Joyce, C. S. 
Levings, C. L. Markert, W. L. Miller, R. L. Mott, D. F. Ollis, J. G. Scandalios, H. 
E. Swaisgood, C. S. Teng, E. C. Theil, W. F. Thompson; Associate Professors: 
H. V. Amerson, W. F. Boss, E. V. L. DeBuysscher, R. E. Johnston, T. R. 
Klaenhammer, T. Melton, R. M. Petters, J. C. H. Shih, S. L. Spiker, H. T. 
Stalker; Assistant Professors: E. F. Bowden S. T. Clark, M. A. Conkling, S. E. 
Curtis, M. E. Daub, L. H. Frampton, F. J. Fuller, R. J. Linderman, E. S. 
Maxwell, D. M. Miller, P. E. Orndoff, R. M. Roe, R. M. Shuman, R. B. van 
Breemen; Assistant Professor (USDA): P. H. Sisco 

The Biotechnology Program includes faculty from seventeen departments in 
the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Engineering, Forest Resources, 
Physical and Mathematical Sciences, and Veterinary Medicine. Graduate study 
leading to a Ph.D. minor in biotechnology may be taken by students who reside 
and conduct their research in one of the participating departments. To obtain a 
minor in biotechnology, the student must successfully complete at least two of the 
laboratory core courses selected from the list below and must conduct graduate 
thesis research in an area of biotechnology. 

Research in biotechnology is focused in three main areas: recombinant DNA 
technology, bioprocessing/bioanalytical techniques, and in vitro culture tech- 
niques. The multidisciplinary nature of biotechnology means that a wide range of 
research topics and techniques are applicable, such as molecular level genetics 
and associated research in molecular biology, enzyme technology and protein 
engineering, bioprocessing using cells or enzymes, development of biosensors, 
hybridoma technology, cell culture techniques and embryo manipulation. 

LIST OF APPROVED COURSES 

ANS 606 Animal Biotechnology: Embryo Manipulation. Preq.: ANS 502. U(1-8)F. Alt. 
yrs. Advanced laboratory course providing training and experience in mammalian embryo 
manipulation including techniques of super ovulation and embryo recovery, in vitro cul- 
ture, parthenogenetic activation, in vitro fertilization, embryo aggregation, and DNA 
microinjection. Petters 

CS (BO, GN, HS) 547 Cell and Tissue Techniques in Plant Breeding. Preqs.: GN505B 
and GN 506B or equivalent. 3(l-U)F.Alt. yrs. Applications of tissue culture and cytogenetic 
techniques for plant improvement. Callus and suspension cultures, plant regeneration, in 
vitro selection, haploidy, polploidy, aneuploidy, wide hybridization and embryo rescue. 
Practical lab experiences in tissue culture and cytogenetic techniques. Reed, Stalker 

FS 504 Food Proteins and Enzymes. Preq.: FS h02 or BCH U51. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. An 
advanced course in food chemistry with emphasis on proteins and enzymes of particular 
importance to foods. Protein interactions and their effect on the physical-chemical charac- 
teristics of a product will be discussed. Particular emphasis will be given to the preparation 
and kinetic properties of immobilized enzymes and their use as biochemical reactors in 
processing operations or as specific electrodes for analytical purposes. Swaisgood 



90 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FS 691 Special Research Problems in Food Science. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. 
Directed research in a specialized phase of food science designed to provide experience in 
research methodology and philosophy. Klaenhammer 

GN 666 Laboratory in Molecular Genetics. Preqs.: GN 505 or equivalent and CI. 4(2-6) 
S. Alt. yrs. A laboratory course in modern techniques of molecular genetics for advanced 
students. Techniques will include in situ hybridization, recombinant DNA methodology, 
and DNA sequencing. Enrollment is limited to 12 students. Applications for a place in the 
course may be obtained from the department. Conkling 

MB 660 Experimental Microbial Genetics. Preqs.: BCH 561, GNA11, MB 1,01. U(2-6)F. 
Laboratory-oriented presentation of current methodologies and concepts in molecular 
microbial genetics and their application to strain construction, plasmid and phage manipu- 
lations, mutagenesis, cloning and genetic engineering of microorganisms. Melton 

PP 605 Molecular Biology of Plant Viruses. Preqs.: PP502B, BCHU51 or 551. 4(2-6) S. 
Alt. yrs. An in-depth study of plant viruses with emphasis on the relationship between viral 
structure and function. Areas covered include infection, replication, genomic expression, 
encapsidation and transmission. Laboratory introduces students to contemporary molecu- 
lar techniques. Graduate Staff 

Botany 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor E. D. Seneca, Head 

Associate Professor T. E. Wynn, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: C. E. Anderson, U. Blum, R. C. Fites, J. W. Hardin, R. L. Mott, W. F. 
Thompson, J. R. Troyer, A. M. Witherspoon; Professors (USDA): W. W. Heck, 
H. E. Pattee, H. Seltmann; Visiting Professor: W. S. Chilton; Professors Eme- 
riti: G. R. Noggle, H. T. Scofield, L. A. Whitford; Associate Professors: R. L. 
Beckmann Jr., W. F. Boss, J. M. Stucky, J. F. Thomas, C. G. Van Dyke, T. R. 
Wentworth; Assistant Professor: J. M. Burkholder; Adjunct Assistant Profes- 
sor: D. E. Blume 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: A. W. Cooper, B. J. Copeland. R. J. Downs, M. M. Goodman, D. H. 
Timothy; Professor (USDA): S. C. Huber; Associate Professors: H. V. Amerson, 
R. L. Hoffman; Assistant Professors (USDA): J. M. Anderson, K. 0. Burkey, T. 
W. RuftyJr. 

The Department of Botany offers programs leading to the Master of Life 
Sciences (non-thesis), Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Excellent physical facilities are available for instruction and research in all 
phases of the departmental program. The Phytotron (part of a two-unit con- 
trolled environment facility operated in collaboration with Duke University) 
offers opportunities for research in experimental taxonomy, ecology, morphol- 
ogy and plant physiology. The department supports a research program in plant 
cell and tissue culture and plant molecular biology. A herbarium supports stu- 
dies in systematic botany, and is augmented by herbaria at nearby Duke Univer- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 91 

sity and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Field laboratories are 
available at the coast, in the Piedmont and in the mountains. The department 
participates in tropical biology programs through university membership in the 
Organization for Tropical Studies. 

All graduate students will participate at least one semester during a degree 
program in the departmental instructional program. Graduate students are 
expected to attend and participate in the seminar program every semester they 
are in residence. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

BO 400 Plant Diversity. Preq.: BO 200. U(3-3) F. 

BO 403 Systematic Botany. Preq.: BS 100 or 105 or BO 200. U(2-U) S. 

BO 4 13 Introductory Plant Anatomy. Preq.: BO 200 or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. 

BO (ZO) 414 Cell Biology. Preqs.: CH 223, PY 212, ZO 201 or 203. 3(3-0) S. 

BO 421 Plant Physiology. Preqs.: BS 100 or BS 105 or BO 200 and one year of college 
chemistry. U(3-3) F,S. 

BO 499 Independent Study in Botany. Preqs.: At least eight hours of Botany, advanced 
standing and presentation of plan of work approved by a faculty member. 1-3 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BO 510 Plant Anatomy. Preq.: BO 200. U(2-6) F. A study of plant cells, ultrastructure, 
cell types, tissues, organs and patterns of growth and differentiation. Anderson 

BO 522 Advanced Morphology and Phylogeny of Seed Plants. Preq.: BOU03. h(3-3) F. 
Alt. yrs. A comprehensive survey of the morphology and evolution of angiosperms and 
gymnosperms. Special emphasis is given to vegetative and reproductive morphology of 
fossil and living forms, and to their presumed evolutionary relationships. Hardin 

BO 524 Grasses, Sedges and Rushes. Preq.: BO A03. 4(2-6) F. Alt. yrs. A course dealing 
with three large, economically and ecologically important plant families. A working famil- 
iarity will be achieved through an introduction to the special terminology used in dealing 
with these plants, extensive field work emphasizing species identification and a study of the 
modern classification of the grasses. Stucky 

BO (CS, ENT, PM, PP) 525 Biological Control. h(3-3) Alt. F. (See pest management.) 

BO 544 Plant Geography. Preqs.: BO U03, BO (ZO) 360, GN Ul or equivalents. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. A course in descriptive and interpretive plant geography, synthesizing data from 
the fields of ecology, genetics, geography, paleobotany and taxonomy. Includes a survey of 
the present distribution of major vegetation types throughout the world, a discussion of the 
history and development of this present pattern of vegetation and a discussion of the 
principles and theories of plant geography. Seneca 

BO (CS, GN, HS) 547 Cell and Tissue Techniques in Plant Breeding. 3(l-h) F. Alt. yrs. 
(See crop science.) 

BO 551 Advanced Plant Physiology I. Preq.: BO U21 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. The first 
half of a two-semester sequence covering the field of plant physiology. Topics will include 
cellular transport, water relations, mineral relations, vascular transport and temperature 
relations. Troyer 



92 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



BO 552 Advanced Plant Physiology II. Preqs.: BO U21 or equivalent and biochemistry. 
3(3-0) S. The second half of a two-semester sequence covering the field of plant physiology. 
Topics will include respiration, photosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism, growth and de- 
velopment. Boss 

BO 553 Laboratory in Advanced Plant Physiology I. Preq. or coreq.: BO 551. 1(0-3) F. 
Laboratory to accompany BO 551 Advanced Plant Physiology I. Graduate Staff 

BO 554 Laboratory in Advanced Plant Physiology II. Preq. or coreq.: BO 552. 1(0-3) S. 
Laboratory to accompany BO 552 Advanced Plant Physiology II Graduate Staff 

BO (ZO) 560 Principles of Ecology. Preq.: Three semesters of college level biology courses. 
U(8-8) F. A consideration of the principles of ecology at the graduate level. Each of the major 
subject areas of ecology is developed in sufficient depth to provide a factual and philosophi- 
cal framework for the understanding of ecology. Blum 

BO 56 1 Physiological Ecology. Preqs.: BO U21 and BO (ZO) 560 or equivalent. A(3-3) S. 
Alt. yrs. The plant community is approached from a physiological standpoint. Emphasis 
will be placed on the individual in the community and how it responds to its immediate 
environment on short- and long-term bases. Blum 

BO 565 Plant Community Ecology. Preq.: BO (ZO) 560 or BO (ZO) 360 or equivalent. 
i(3-3) F. Consideration of the structure and function of terrestrial vascular plant communi- 
ties, with emphasis on both classical and recent research. Topics include measurement and 
description of community properties, classification, ordination, vegetation pattern in rela- 
tion to environment, ecological succession and a survey of the vegetation of North America. 

Wentworth 

BO (BMA) 567 Modeling of Biological Systems. U(3-2) F. (See biomathematics.) 

BO 570 Quantitative Ecology. Preqs.: BO (ZO) 560 and ST 512 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. A 
course emphasizing the quantitative techniques and theories of vegetation analysis. Topics 
include sampling methodologies, the evaluation of sample adequacy, spatial patterns and 
species associations, the measurement and interpretation of ecological diversity, gradient 
analysis and classification of communities and plant population dynamics. 

Graduate Staff 

BO (MB) 574 Phycology. Preq.: BS 100 or BO 200. S(l-U) S. Alt. yrs. An introduction to 
the taxonomy, morphology, reproduction and ecological importance of organisms which 
may be included in the algae. Attention is given to the local freshwater flow and the 
physiology of selected species as it relates to algal blooms, water quality and nutrient 
loading in aquatic habitats. Graduate Staff 

BO (MB, PP) 575 The Fungi. Preq.: BO 200 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. An overview of the 
fungi within the framework of a survey of the major classes. Van Dyke 

BO (MB, PP) 576 The Fungi— Lab. Coreq.: BO 575. 1(0-3) F. Illustrative material of the 
fungal assemblages discussed in BO 575. Van Dyke 

BO 590 Topical Problems. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S. Discussions and readings on problems of 
current interest in the fields of ecology, anatomy and morphology, taxonomy, plant physiol- 
ogy and cell biology. May be repeated with a change in topic for a maximum of six credits. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BO 612 Plant Morphogenesis. Preq.: Six hours of botany equivalent to BO 1+00 and BO 
U21. k(3-3) S. AH. yrs. A review and synthesis of the factors involved in the development of 
plant form. Tissue culture experiments will demonstrate levels of control from the molecu- 
lar to the whole organism. Mott 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 93 



BO 620 Advanced Taxonomy. Preq.: BO h03. U(2-6) S. Alt. yrs. Taxonomic principles 
and techniques including rules of nomenclature, literature, biosystematic methods, mono- 
graphic techniques and concepts of categories. Stucky 

BO (PP) 625 Advanced Mycology. M2-6) F. (See plant pathology.) 

BO 631 Water Relations of Plants. Preq.: BO 551 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A 
discussion of the physiological water relations of plants with emphasis on theoretical 
principles and quantitative description. Troyer 

BO 633 Plant Growth and Development. Preqs.: BO (ZO) 1*11+ or BO U21, organic 
chemistry. 3(3-0) S. An advanced course in plant physiology covering plant growth, devel- 
opment, differentiation, senescence and biological control mechanisms. Fites 

BO 634 Introduction to the Thermodynamics of Biological Systems. Preq.: BO 551 or 
CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. An introductory development of the thermodynamic theory relevant to 
biological systems together with consideration of examples of biological problems to which 
thermodynamic theory has been applied. Troyer 

BO 636 Discussions in Plant Physiology. Preqs.: BO (ZO) hlU or BO U21, organic 
chemistry. 1(1-0) F,S. Group discussions at an advanced level on selected topics. 

Graduate Staff 

BO (ZO) 660 Advanced Topics in Ecology I. Preq.: BO (ZO) 560. 3(3-0) S. Subject 
matter in the major fields of ecology will be developed through seminars and lectures, and 
principles will be illustrated by laboratory exercises and field trips. Topics covered include 
microenvironment, population biology, community ecology, ecosystems and nutrient 
cycling. Graduate Staff 

BO (ZO) 661 Advanced Topics in Ecology II. U(3-3) S. (See zoology.) 

BO 662 Applied Coastal Ecology. Preq.: BO (ZO) 360 or BO (ZO) 560. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Course will cover the environmental factors, the vegetative communities, and man's influ- 
ence on the ecology of the Coastal Plain of North Carolina. Emphasis will be placed on the 
coastal fringe (Outer Banks) and the problems involved in Coastal Zone Management. 
Course is field and problem oriented and is designed primarily for graduate students in 
environmentally oriented programs. Two field trips are mandatory. Seneca 

BO 691 Botany Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 

BO 693 Special Problems in Botany. Credits Arranged. Directed research in some 
phase of botany other than a thesis problem, but designed to provide experience and 
training in research. Graduate Staff 

BO 699 Research. Credits Arranged. F,S. Original research preliminary to writing a 
master's thesis or a doctoral dissertation. Graduate Staff 



Chemical Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. F. Ollis, Head 

Professor C. K. Hall, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: R. G. Carbonell, R. M. Felder, J. K. Ferrell, H. B. Hopfenberg, D. B. 
Marsland, A. S. Michaels, M. R. Overcash, E. P. Stahel, V. T. Stannett; Adjunct 



94 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Professors: F. 0. Mixon, D. R. Squire; Professors Emeriti: R. Bright, J. F. Seely, 
H. B. Smith; Associate Professors: P. S. Fedkiw, P. K. Lim, C. J. Setzer, S. 
Torquato, H. M. Winston; Adjunct Associate Professor: J. L. Williams; Assist- 
ant Professors: C. M. Balik, R. T. Chern, P. K. Kilpatrick, S. W. Peretti; 
Lecturers: H. H. Lamb, W. E. Willis Jr. 

The Department of Chemical Engineering offers programs of advanced study 
leading to the Master of Science, Master of Chemical Engineering and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. Students enrolling for graduate study in the department 
normally have a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering, but programs can be 
arranged to accommodate students with degrees in applied mathematics, chem- 
istry, physics and other branches of engineering. 

The department occupies 50,000 square feet in the Riddick Engineering 
Laboratories. Within the building are several general-purpose laboratories for 
graduate research, fully staffed machine and electronics shops, and a well- 
equipped instrumental analysis laboratory. Several VAX computers within the 
department and terminal link to larger mainframe computers provide outstand- 
ing programming and word processing capability. 

Extensive research in the department is carried out by several faculty 
members in the areas of biotechnology and polymer and membrane science and 
engineering. Other active research areas include heterogeneous and homogene- 
ous catalysis, surface science, chemical reaction engineering, fluid dynamics, 
mass transfer in porous media, solid waste management, membrane separation 
techniques, batch process simulation and optimization, phase equilibrium ther- 
modynamics, statistical thermodynamics, interfacial phenomena and electro- 
chemical engineering. 

The proximity of UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke University and the Research Trian- 
gle Park lends considerable support to departmental research programs. The 
Environmental Protection Agency, for example, has its principal air pollution 
research facility in the Research Triangle Park, and arrangements can be made 
for graduate students studying air pollution problems to work at the EPA center 
under the joint direction of EPA and University staff members. 

A brochure describing in greater detail opportunities for graduate study and 
research in chemical engineering as well as available fellowships and assistant- 
ships may be obtained upon request from the graduate administrator. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CHE 425 Process System Analysis and Control. Preq.: CHE 225. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CHE 446 Design and Analysis of Chemical Reactors. Preq.: CHE 315; Coreq.: CHE 
316. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CHE 451 Chemical Engineering Design. Preqs.: CHE h2l, U6. 3(2-2) F,S. 

CHE (BAE) 465 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. Preqs.: MA 202 or 212, PY 
212 or 208. 3(3-0) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CHE 511 Chemical Engineering Process Modeling. Preqs.: CHE 311, CHE 312, MA 
301. 3(3-0) F. Applications of the methods of mathematical analysis to the formulation and 
solution of problems in transport phenomena, process dynamics and chemical reaction 
engineering. Fedkiw 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 95 

CHE 513 Thermodynamics I. Preqs.: CHE 315, 316. 3(3-0) F. In-depth coverage of 
chemical engineering thermodynamics principles. Application of non-ideal fluid-phase 
chemical potentials to problems in phase and chemical reaction equilibria. Relations of 
molecular structure and intermoleeular forces to macroscopic thermodynamic properties. 

Hall, Kilpatrick, 

CHE 515 Transport Phenomena. Preq.: CHE 311. 3(3-0) F. A theoretical unified study 
of transport of momentum, energy and matter. The dif fusional operations are introduced in 
the light of the theory. Carbonell 

CHE 516 Transport Phenomena II. Preq.: CHE 515. 3(3-0) S. Applications of the 
principles introduced in CHE 515. The applications discussed include multiphase flow and 
sedimentation, non-Newtonian and porous media flows, transport through membranes and 
in electrochemical systems, and thermal instabilities. Carbonell 

CHE 517 Chemical Reaction Engineering. Preq.: CHEU6. 3(3-0) S. Rates and mecha- 
nisms of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. Design, analysis and scale-up of batch 
and continuous chemical reactors. Felder, Stahel 

CHE 521 Separation Processes. Preq.: CHE 312. 3(3-0) S. The theory and practice of 
staged multicomponent mass transfer operations and continuous rate processes. Problems 
unique to specific operations such as extractive and azeotropic distillation. Lamb, Stahel 

CHE 525 Chemical Process Control. Preq.: CHE U25. 3(3-0) F. The application of 
control techniques to chemical process systems. Review of single-input, single-output con- 
trol techniques, sampled data systems and Z-transform methods. Advanced control tech- 
niques including multivariable systems, inferential and adaptive control, deadtime con- 
trol, and interaction analysis. Ferrell, Winston 

CHE (OR) 527 Optimization of Engineering Processes. Preqs.: CHE A51 or OR 501, 
FORTRAN programming. 3(3-0) F. The formulation and solution of process optimization 
problems, with emphasis on nonlinear programming techniques. Computer implementa- 
tion of optimization algorithms, on-line optimization, simulation methods and structuring 
of process models to increase computational efficiency. Felder 

CHE 535 Engineering Economy in Air Pollution Control Systems. Preqs.: MAE 1+09, 
CE 576 or equivalent first course. 3(3-2) F. Design of equipment for the abatement of air 
pollution; estimation of capital cost and operating expenses; economic optimization under 
various kinds of tax laws. Marsland 

CHE 543 Polymer Sciences and Technology. Preqs.: CHE 223, CHE 316. 3(3-0) F. 
Concepts and techniques for the polymerization of macromolecules. Structure, properties, 
and applications of commercially important polymers. Chern 

CHE 551 Biochemical Engineering. Preqs.: CHE 312, U6. 3(3-0) S. Enzyme and 
microbial kinetics and reactor designs for processes involving enzymes and single and 
mixed cultures. Samples drawn from the full range of applications: food processing, single 
cell proteins, tissue culture and vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, recombinant DNA and 
hybridomas, artificial organs, biological waste treatment, and environmental processes. 

Guinnup, Ollis 

CHE 561 Biomedical Engineering I: Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer. Preq.: CHE 
(BAE) 465 or equivalent background. 3(3-0) S. The physiology requisite to modeling and 
analysis of mammalian systems, coupled with the engineering approach to the biomedical 
problems of flow of fluids (blood, lymph, air, etc.) in the body and thermal transport from 
the body surfaces. Beatty, Richardson 



96 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



CHE (TC) 569 Polymers, Surfactants and Colloidal Materials. Preqs.: CHE 316, CH 
228. S(S-O) F. Relationships between molecular structure and bulk properties of nonmetal- 
lic materials applied to commercial products and chemical engineering processes. Applica- 
tions of surface and colloid chemistry and polymer science to product development and 
process improvement. Chern, Michaels 

CHE (TC) 570 Radiation Chemistry and Technology of Polymeric Systems. Preqs.: 
CH 221, US1. 3(3-0) S. Principles and practice of isotope and electron beam radiation 
treatment. Applications of high energy radiation in polymer chemistry and technology, 
including the use of radiation to cross-link and degrade polymers. Similarities and differ- 
ences between radiation polymerization and photopolymerization. Stannett, Williams 

CHE 597 Chemical Engineering Projects. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. Independent 
study of some phase of chemical engineering or a related field. Graduate Staff 

CHE 598 Special Topics in Chemical Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. 
Directed reading of the chemical engineering literature, introduction to research metho- 
dology, and lectures and seminar discussion on topics which vary from term to term. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CHE 611 Chemical Process Design and Simulation. Preq.: CHE 511. 3(3-0) S. Applica- 
tion of process analysis, simulation and optimization techniques to case studies of complex 
chemical processes. Felder 

CHE 613 Thermodynamics II. Preq.: CHE 513. 3(3-0) S. Topics in chemical engineer- 
ing thermodynamics. Perturbation theories, critical phenomena, multicomponent phase 
equilibria, supercritical extraction, irreversible thermodynamics and thermodynamics of 
macromolecules are representative topics. Hall, Kilpatrick 

CHE 617 Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering. Preq.: CHE 517. 3(3-0) S. Topics 
relating to the design, analysis and operation of homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical 
reactors. Stahel 

CHE 619 Electrochemical Systems Analysis. Preqs.: CHE 515, 5 17 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. Electrochemical thermodynamics, electrochemical kinetics and catalysis, coupled 
charge and material transport in an electric field and electrophoretic effects. Design and 
analysis of electrochemical reactors. Survey of electrochemical industry. Fedkiw 

CHE 621 Advanced Mass Transfer. Preqs.: CHE 515, 521. 3(3-0) Alt. F. Applications of 
transport theory to the analysis, synthesis and design of mass-transfer equipment. Princi- 
ples and design of absorption, extraction, distillation, humidification and drying 
operations. Carbonell, Lamb 

CHE 623 Advanced Fluid Dynamics. Preqs.: CHE 515, 523. 3(3-0) S. The principles of 
fluid dynamics and their application to laminar and turbulent flow, flow in closed channels, 
flow in packed beds and porous media, particle technology, industrial rheology and two- 
phase flow. Carbonell 

CHE 624 Advanced Heat Transfer. Preq.: CHE 515, 523. 3(3-0) Alt. S. Heat transfer 
between liquids and solids, optimum operating conditions and design of equipment, con- 
duction, heating and cooling of solids, and radiant heat transmission. Ferrell 

CHE 651 Separation Processes for Biological Materials. Preq.: CHE 521 or CHE 551 

or CI. 3(3-0) S. Definition and engineering analysis of major bioseparation techniques 
useful in product isolation and purification. Topics discussed include solid-liquid separa- 
tion, crystallization, filtration, extraction, chromatography, membrane processes, distilla- 
tion, drying, combined operations and process economics. Ollis 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 97 

CHE (TC) 669 Diffusion in Polymers. Preq.: CHE 569 or CI. 2(2-0) S. The theory of 
small molecule transport in polymers; applications of membrane transport processes in the 
chemical, polymer, textile, coatings and natural fiber industries. Chern, Hopfenberg 

CHE (TC) 671 Special Topics in Polymer Science. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F. An intensive 
treatment of topics in polymer science and technology selected in accord with the state of 
the art. Chern, Stannett 

CHE 693 Advanced Topics in Chemical Engineering. 1-3 F,S. Recent developments 
in chemical engineering theory and practice. The topics will vary from term to term. 

Graduate Staff 

CHE 695 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Weekly seminars on topics of current interest given by 
resident faculty members, graduate students and visiting lecturers. Graduate Staff 

CHE 697 Advanced Chemical Engineering Projects. Preq.: Grad. standing in CHE. 
1-3 F,S, Sum. Independent study of some phase of chemical engineering or a related field. 

Graduate Staff 

CHE 699 Research. Credits Arranged. F,S. Individual research in chemical engineer- 
ing. A report on this research is required as a graduate thesis. Graduate Staff 



Chemistry 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor K. W. Hanck, Head 

Professor C. G. Moreland, Assistant Head for Graduate Studies 

Professor M. L. Miles, Assistant Head for Business Affairs 

Professor W. P. Tucker, Assistant Head for Undergraduate Studies 

Professors: K. J. Bachmann, H. A. Bent, R. D. Bereman, L. H. Bowen, C. L. 
Bumgardner, H. H. Carmichael, L. D. Freedman, F. W. Getzen, F. C. Hentz Jr. 
Z Z. Hugus Jr., L. A. Jones, S. G. Levine, G. G. Long, A. F. Schreiner, L. B. 
Sims, E. 0. Stejskal, G. H. Wahl Jr., M. H. Whangbo; Professors Emeriti: G. 0. 
Doak, R. H. Loeppert, W. A. Reid, P. P. Sutton, R. C. White; Associate Profes- 
sors: C. B. Boss, T. C. Caves, A. F. Coots, Y. Ebisuzaki, S. T. Purrington, W. L. 
Switzer, D. W. Wertz; Associate Professor Emeritus: T. M. Ward; Assistant 
Professors: E. F. Bowden, R. J. Linderman, R. B. van Breemen 



The Department of Chemistry offers programs leading to the Master of Chem- 
istry, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Major fields of special- 
ization are analytical, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. A wide variety 
of advanced courses and a broad spectrum of research topics provide preparation 
for almost every type of position open to a chemist with an advanced degree. 

A student entering graduate work in chemistry should have a bachelor's 
degree in chemistry or its equivalent. This includes the equivalent of one-year 



98 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

courses in general, organic, physical and analytical chemistry and a semester of 
inorganic chemistry. At least one year of college physics and two years of mathe- 
matics, including differential equations, are necessary. Students who fail to meet 
these requirements may in some cases be admitted on a provisional basis. 

With a large graduate faculty and favorable graduate student to faculty ratio, 
the chemistry department emphasizes individual attention, small classes and 
personal collaboration on research with faculty members. Among the variety of 
active research projects available for thesis work are organic and inorganic 
synthesis, synthesis/characterization of semiconductors, structure and proper- 
ties of organometallic compounds and transition metal complexes, stereochemis- 
try, crystallography, kinetics, radiochemistry, electrochemistry, micro and trace 
analysis, atomic and plasma spectroscopy, micro computer and statistical appli- 
cations, quantum chemistry, and infrared, Raman, Mossbauer, nuclear mag- 
netic resonance, nuclear quadrupole resonance, electron spin resonance, and 
natural and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy. 

The department is equipped with standard instruments and apparatus for 
teaching and research. Many items of specialized equipment are available 
including recording spectrophotometers covering the range from far infrared to 
ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, liquid chromatographs, 
gas chromatographs, high resolution mass spectrometer, atomic absorption 
spectrophotometers, electron spin resonance spectrometer, nuclear quadrupole 
resonance spectrometer, Mossbauer spectrometer, DC plasma spectrometer and 
X-ray diffractometer. Facilities for interfacing laboratory instruments and 
computers are available. The department's research activities are housed in a 
nine-story building and supported by glass, machine and electronic shops. 

The department has available for qualified applicants teaching and research 
assistantships, as well as a number of fellowships. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CH 401 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry.Cora?.. CH U31 or CH 331. 3(3-0) S. 

CH 41 1 Analytical Chemistry I. Preq.: CH U3U. M2-6) F. 

CH 413 Analytical Chemistry II. Preq.: CH ill. i(2-6) S. 

CH 428 Qualitative Organic Analysis. Preq.: CH 223. 3(1-6) F,S. 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I. Preqs.: CH 107, MA 202, PY 203 or 208; Coreq.: MA 301. 
3(2-1) F,S,Sum. 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II. Preqs.: CH iSl and MA 301. 3(2-1) F,S. 

CH 434 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory. Preq.: CH iSl; Coreq.: CH U33. 2(0-i) S. 

CH 435 Physical Chemistry III. Preqs.: CH 1*31 and MA 301. 3(3-0) F. 

CH (TC) 461 Introduction to Fiber-Forming Polymers. Preq.: CH 223. 3(3-0) F. 

CH 490 Chemical Preparations. Preq.: Three years of CH. 3(0-9) F,S. 

CH 493 Chemical Literature. Preq.: Three years of CH. 1(1-0) F. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 99 



CH 499 Senior Research in Chemistry. Preq.: Three years ofCH. Credits Arranged. 1-3 

F.S.Sutn. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CH 501 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I. Preq.: CH433. 3(3-0) F. The major emphasis 
of this course is on the complexes of the transition metals (3d, 4d and 5d). Topics included 
are the structure, stability, synthesis and raction mechanisms of these complexes. Included 
also is the consideration of organometallic compounds and of species containing metal- 
metal bonds. 

CH 502 Inorganic Syntheses and Measurements. Preq.: CH 401. 2(0-6) F. Synthetic 
methods in inorganic chemistry, including high-temperature, electrolytic, inert-atmos- 
phere, vacuum line and solvent-system methods. Separation and characterization tech- 
niques for inorganic systems will be widely employed. 

CH 503 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II. Preq.: CH 501. 3(3-0) S. This course, a 
continuation of CH 501, deals with the use of photochemical reactions as applied to inor- 
ganic complexes, metal cluster complexes and organometallic systems. Other topics 
treated at length are solid-state chemistry and bioinorganic chemistry. Discussion of 
structure, synthesis, energetics, reactions and applications is presented. In addition, other 
topics of current research interest in inorganic chemistry are briefly discussed. 

CH 505 Physical Methods in Inorganic Chemistry. Preqs.: Grad. standing and CH 501 
or CI. 3(3-0) S. The course will describe the use of group, molecular orbital and ligand field 
theories for spectroscopy and bonding; measurement methodology and the significance of 
experimental parameters, including electronic, photoluminescence, photoelectron, vibra- 
tional spectroscopies, magnetic susceptibility, Mossbauer, esr, nmr, nqr and x-ray struc- 
ture determinations. 

CH (MAT) 507 Chemical Concepts in Materials Science and Engineering. 3(3-0) F. 
(See materials science and engineering.) 

CH 515 Chemical Instrumentation. Preq.: CH 481; Coreq.: CH 411. 3(3-0) S. Basic 
electronic components and circuits, the response of laboratory instruments, design and 
modification of typical electronic control and measurement systems. Emphasis will be 
placed on the transducers and control elements utilized in chemical research. 

CH 517 Physical Methods of Elemental Trace Analysis. Preq.: CH 315 or 331 or CI. 

3(3-0) F. The principles and applications of currently used methods of trace analysis are 
presented. Designed for students with little or no experience in trace analysis but with a 
strong interest in or need for analytical data at the trace level. Topics include pulse 
polarography, potentiometry, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, atomic absorption, emission 
spectrometry, fluorescence, neutron activation analysis and spark source mass spec- 
trometry. 

CH 518 Trace Analysis Laboratory. Coreq.: CH 51 7 or CI. 2(0-6) F. The trace element 
content of samples is determined by a variety of instrumental techniques including UV-Vis 
spectrophotometry, fluorescence, emission spectrometry, atomic absorption, pulse polaro- 
graphy and neutron activation analysis. 

CH 521 Advanced Organic Chemistry I. Preqs.: CH223, 433 or 435. 3(3-0) F. Structure 
stereochemistry and reactions of the various classes of hydrocarbons. The molecular orbital 
treatment of bonding and reactivity of alkenes. the conformational interpretation of 
cycloalkene and cycloaklene reactivity and the application of optical isomerism to the study 
of reaction mechanisms will be emphasized. 



100 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



CH 523 Advanced Organic Chemistry II. Preq.: CH 521. 3(3-0) S. An introduction to 
acid-base theory and mechanistic organic chemistry as applied to synthetically useful 
organic reactions. 

CH 525 Physical Methods in Organic Chemistry. Preqs.: CH223andU33orU35. 3(3-0) 
S. Application of physical methods to the solution of structural problems in organic chemis- 
try. Emphasis will be on spectral methods including infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear mag- 
netic resonance, mass spectrometry, electron paramagnetic resonance, X-ray and electron 
diffraction and optical rotatory dispersion. 

CH 530 Advanced Physical Chemistry. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) F. A survey 
of chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, with emphasis on reactions in the liquid phase. 
Problem solving is an important part of the course. Designed to review and to expand on 
materials usually covered in a one-year undergraduate physical chemistry course. 

CH 531 Chemical Thermodynamics. Preqs.: CHU33, MA 301. 3(3-0) F. An extension of 
elementary principles to the treatment of ideal and real gases, ideal solutions, electrolytic 
solutions, galvanic cells, surface systems and irreversible processes. An introduction to 
statistical thermodynamics and the estimation of thermodynamic frunctions from spec- 
troscopic data. 

CH 533 Chemical Kinetics. Preqs.: CH 188, MA 301. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. An intensive 
survey of the basic principles of chemical kinetics with emphasis on experimental and 
mathematical techniques, elements of the kinetic theory and theory of the transition state. 
Applications to gas reactions, reactions in solution and mechanism studies. 

CH 535 Surface Phenomena. Preqs.: CH U33, MA 301. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. An intensive 
survey of the topics of current interest in surface phenomena. Formulations of basic 
theories are presented together with illustrations of their current applications. 

CH 536 Chemical Spectroscopy. Preq.: CH U35. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Introduction to 
rotational, vibrational and electronic molecular spectroscopy from a quantum mechanical 
viewpoint. Emphasis on the elucidation of structure, bonding and excited state properties 
of organic and inorganic molecules. 

CH 537 Quantum Chemistry. Preqs.: MA 301, CHU35 orPYW. 3(3-0) S. The elements 
of wave mechanics applied to stationary energy states and time dependent phenomena. 
Applications of quantum theory to chemistry, particularly chemical bonds. 

CH 539 Colloid Chemistry. Preqs.: CH220, 315 or 331, or CI. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. Theories, 
basic principles and fundamental concepts including preparation and behavior of sols, gels, 
emulsions, foams and aerosols and topics in areas of adsorption, Donnan equilibrium 
dialysis and small-particle dynamics. Laboratory includes independent project studies in 
specialized areas. 

CH 541 Nuclear Chemistry. Preq.: CH U33 or PY UO. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. The basic aspects 
of nuclear chemistry including: (i) nuclear reactions and energy levels, (ii) the types and 
energetics of radioactive decay, (iii) the formation and properties of radioactive elements, 
(iv) the effect of individual isotopes on chemical and physical properties and (v) the effects of 
nuclear radiation on matter. 

CH (TC) 562 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers— Bulk Properties. 3(3-0) F. (See 
textile chemistry.) 

CH 595 Special Topics in Chemistry. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S. Detailed study of a particular 
problem or technique pertaining to chemistry. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 101 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 



CH 613 Electrochemistry. Preq.: CH U33. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The thermodynamics and 
kinetics of electrode reactions are presented as well as the experimental methods for 
studying them. Particular emphasis is placed on the measurement of standard potential 
and establishing the number of electrons transferred. Applications of electrochemistry in 
the production/storage of energy and in chemical analysis are discussed. 

CH 625 Organic Reaction Mechanisms. Preqs.: CH523, CHU33. 3(3-0) S. A study of the 
effects of structure and substituents on the direction and rates of organic reactions. 

CH 627 Chemistry of Metal-Organic Compounds. Preq.: CH 521. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
Preparation, properties and reactions of compounds containing the carbon-metal bond 
with a brief description of their uses. 

CH 631 Chemical Thermodynamics II. Preq.: CH 531. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Statistical 
interpretation of thermodynamics; use of partition functions; introduction to quantum 
statistics; application of statistical mechanics to chemical problems, including calculation 
of thermodynamic properties, equilibria and rate processes. 

CH (BCH) 659 Natural Products. Preqs.: CH 523, 525 or CI. 3(3-0) F. Illustrative 
studies of structure determination, synthesis and biosynthesis of natural substances. Mod- 
ern physical methods and fundamental chemical concepts are stressed. Examples are 
chosen from such classes as alkaloids, terpenes, steroids and antibiotics. 

CH 691 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing in CH. 1(1-0) F,S. Scientific articles, progress 
reports on research and special problems of interest to chemists are reviewed and 
discussed. 

CH 695 Advanced Topics in Chemistry. Preq.: CI. Maximum 3 F,S. Critical study in 
one of the branches of chemistry. 

CH 697 Advanced Chemistry Projects. Preq.: Grad. standing in CH. 1-3. F,S,Sum. 
Independent literature study of a current subject in chemistry. A critical review paper of 
the selected subject must be written. 

CH 699 Chemical Research. Preq.: Grad. standing in CH. Credits Arranged. F,S. 
Special problems that will furnish material for a thesis. A maximum of six semester credits 
is allowed toward a master's degree; there is no limitation on credits in the doctoral 
program. 

Civil Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor P. Z. Zia, Head 

Professor H. E. Wahls, Associate Head, Graduate Program 

Professors: M. Amein, P. D. Cribbins, R. A. Douglas, J. F. Ely, J. S. Fisher, W. S. 
Galler, A. K. Gupta, K. S. Havner, Y. Horie, J. W. Horn, D. W. Johnston, N. P. 
Khosla, P. H. McDonald, C. C. Tung; Adjunct Professors: R. C. Heath, L. E. 
King; Professors Emeriti: W. F. Babcock, R. E. Fadum, C. L. Heimbach, A. -A. 
I. Kashef, S. W. Nunnally, C. Smallwood Jr., M. E. Uyanik; Associate Profes- 
sors: S. H. Ahmad, W. L. Bingham, R. H. Borden, A. C. Chao, E. D. Gurley, H. 



102 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



R. Malcom Jr., V. C. Matzen, M. S. Rahman, W. J. Rasdorf, J. C. Smith, J. R. 
Stone; Adjunct Associate Professor: J. E. Tidwell; Assistant Professors: R. C. 
Borden, F. Farid, P. C. Lambe, J. M. Nau, M. F. Overton, R. R. Rust, A. E. 
Schultz 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers programs of study leading to the 
Master of Civil Engineering, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. Students may major in construction engineering, geotechnical engi- 
neering, public works engineering, structural engineering and mechanics, 
transportation engineering, coastal and ocean engineering, or sanitary and 
water resources engineering. 

The Master of Civil Engineering degree is a non-thesis program emphasizing 
engineering design and practice. The program of study must include a minimum 
of three credit hours of independent study with a final written report. The Master 
of Science degree requires a thesis for which no more than six semester hours of 
credit may be used to satisfy the minimum degree requirements. For both 
degrees, the major and supporting areas of study may be selected from specialty 
areas within the Department of Civil Engineering. Both degrees require a final 
oral examination. 

For the doctoral program, there are no definite requirements in credit hours. 
The coursework usually requires about one year of full-time study beyond the 
master's degree. The major element of the doctoral program is the dissertation, 
which reports an original investigation that represents a significant contribution 
to knowledge. 

The faculty is engaged in broad research areas including deterministic and 
probabilistic structural theories and mechanics, fundamental behavior of soils 
and structures, computer-aided design, artificial intelligence, highway safety, 
land use and urban planning, hydraulics and hydrology, coastal processes, mate- 
rials, construction engineering and management, waste disposal and pollution 
control. Many of the investigations are sponsored by industries and federal and 
state agencies including the continuing cooperative highway research program. 

The department cooperates with other University divisions in joint programs. 
The department, in collaboration with the Department of Political Science and 
Public Administration, offers a program in public works engineering adminis- 
tration leading to the Master of Civil Engineering with a co-major in public 
affairs. Qualified students may schedule courses in this department and in the 
Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill to receive a dual degree, a Master of Science with a major in 
transportation engineering and a Master of Regional Planning. Multidiscipli- 
nary study and research programs are also available through the North Carolina 
Institute for Transportation Research and Education, Water Resources Re- 
search Institute and the North Carolina Sea Grant Program. 

Students in other disciplines may develop minor areas of study within the 
framework of departmental course offerings. In particular, courses of instruc- 
tion in stream sanitation and industrial waste disposal provide the types of 
training in pollution often in demand by industry. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 103 

Brochures and supplementary information on graduate study, research and 
assistantships and fellowships are available upon request from the graduate 
administrator of the Department of Civil Engineering. For applicants without a 
degree from a U.S. institution, GRE scores are required to expedite considera- 
tion for admission and financial aid. This requirement may be waived upon 
written request for applicants with an exceptional scholastic record. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CE 406 Transportation Systems Engineering. Preq.: CE 305; Coreqs.:IE311, CE375. 
3(3-0) F,S. 

CE 425 Intermediate Structural Analysis. Preq.: CE 325. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CE 426 Structural Steel Design. Preq.: CE 325. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CE 428 Structural Design in Wood. Preq.: CE 325. 3(2-2) F. 

CE 443 Seepage, Earth Embankments and Retaining Structures. Preq.: CE 3U2. 
3(3-0) F,S. 

CE 463 Cost Analysis and Control. Preq.: CE 365. 3(2-3) F,S. 

CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting. Preq.: Sr. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CE 466 Building Construction Engineering. Preqs.: CE327, 365; Coreq.: CEA26. 3(2-2) 
F.S. 

CE 484 Water Supply and Waste Water Systems. Preq.: CE 383. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CE 498 Special Problems in Civil Engineering. Preq.: Sr. standing. 1-U F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CE 501 Transportation Systems Analysis. Preq.: CE h06. 3(3-0) F. Application of 
systems analysis to multi-modal transportation studies. Covers the analysis, planning and 
design of transport facilities for both the public and private sectors. Planning is discussed 
from the short-run as well as the long-run perspective. Stone 

CE 502 Transportation Operations. Preq.: CE 1+06. 3(3-0) S. The analysis of traffic and 
transportation engineering operations. Graduate Staff 

CE 503 Transportation Design. Preq.: CE U06. 3(2-3) S. The geometric elements of 
traffic and transportation engineering design. Cribbins, Horn 

CE 504 Water Transportation. Preq.: CE305. 3(3-0) F. The planning, design, construc- 
tion and operation of waterways, ports, harbors and related facilities. Development of 
analytical techniques for evaluating the feasibility of piers, ports and multipurpose river 
basin projects. The design of marine structures and civil works that are significant in civil 
engineering, including locks, dams, harbors, ports and contractive and protective works. 

Cribbins 

CE 505 Mass Transportation. Preq.: CE h06. 3(3-0) S. Definition of the characteristics, 
trends, issues and technologies related to mass transportation, and the identification of 
methodologies applicable to the planning, design and management of mass transportation 
systems. This includes applications to the urban, inter-urban and rural settings for both 
short- and long-range planning horizons. Stone 



104 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CE 506 Municipal Engineering Projects. Preq.: Sr. standing in CE or CEC. 3(2-3) S. 
Special problems relating to public works, public utilities, urban planning and city 
engineering. Horn 

CE 507 Airphoto Analysis I. Preq.: Sr. standing. 3(2-3) S. Principles and concepts for 
engineering evaluation of aerial photographs, including analysis of soils and surface drain- 
age characteristics. Wahls 

CE 511, 512 Continuum Mechanics I, II. Preqs.: CE 313 or MAE 31U, CE 382 or MAE 
308, MAE 301, MA A05. (511) 3(3-0) F; (512) 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The concepts of stress and 
strain are presented in generalized tensor form. Emphasis is placed on the discussion and 
relative comparisons of the analytical models for elastic, plastic, fluid, viscoelastic, granu- 
lar and porous media. The underlying thermodynamic principles are presented, the asso- 
ciated boundary value problems are formulated and selected examples are used to illus- 
trate the theory. McDonald 

CE 513 Theory of Elasticity I. Preq.: CE 313 or MAE 3U. 3(3-0) S. The fundamental 
equations governing the behavior of an elastic solid are developed in various curvilinear 
coordinate systems. Plane problems, as well as the St. Venant problem of bending, torsion 
and extension of bars are covered. Displacement fields, stress fields, Airy and complex 
stress functions are among the methods used to obtain solutions. 

Douglas, Gurley, Horie 

CE 514 Stress Waves. Preqs.: MA 301; CE 313 or PY Ull or MA U01 or MEA 351. 3(3-0) 
F. Alt. yrs. Introduction to the theory of stress waves in solids. Origins and nature of 
longitudinal transverse and surface waves originating at an impact site or from other 
transient disturbances. Determination of stresses, particle velocities, wave velocities. 
Introduction to wave interaction with other waves and with boundaries and dissimilar 
materials. Introduction to modern instrumentation and seismic refraction exploration. 

Douglas 

CE 521 Advanced Strength of Materials. Preq.: CE313orMAE31h. 3(3-0)F. Stresses 
and strains at a point: rosette analysis; strength theories, stress concentration and fatigue; 
torsion and unsymmetrical bending of open and closed sections; inelastic, composite and 
curved beams; energy methods; shear deflections; and membrane stresses in shells. 

Graduate Staff 

CE 522 Elastic Stability. Preqs.: CE 521, MA 301, 1+05. 3(3-0) S. A study of elastic and 
plastic stability. The stability criterion as a determinant. The energy method and the 
theorem of stationary potential energy. The solution of buckling problems by finite differ- 
ences and the calculus of variations. The application of successive approximations to 
stability problems. Graduate Staff 

CE 524 Analysis and Design of Masonry Structures. Coreq.: CEl+27. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
Theory and design of masonry arches, culverts, dams, foundations and masonry walls 
subjected to lateral loads. Graduate Staff 

CE 525 Matrix Structural Analysis. Preq.: CE U25. 3(3-0) F. Direct formulation of the 
banded system stiffness matrix and loading vectors for a first order Displacement Method 
analysis of two- and three-dimensional structural frames, trusses and grids; analysis by 
substructures; effects of prestrain, temperature, support settlements, shear deformations 
and joint deformations; second order analysis; computer applications using existing com- 
puter programs. Smith 

CE 526 Finite Element Methods for Civil Engineering. Preqs.: CE 1+25 and prior- 
programming knowledge. 3(3-0) S. A basic course in finite element method for civil engi- 
neering. Development, theory and formulation of various finite elements. On-hand finite 
element computer programming. On-hand finite element analysis of civil engineering 
problems, such as dam structures, hyperbolic cooling towers, slabs and soil-structure 
interaction problems. Gupta 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 105 



CE 527 Analysis and Design of Structures for Dynamic Loads. Preq. or coreq.: CE 
525. 3(3-0) F. Analysis and design of single and multi-degree-of-freedom structures sub- 
jected to various types of excitations and initial conditions. Computational aspects of 
dynamic analysis. Introduction to nonlinear analysis techniques and to approximate 
methods of analysis. Consideration of strong motion earthquakes. Study of earthquake 
regulations in building codes. Matzen, Nau 

CE 531 Structural Models. Preq.: CEU27. 3(2-3) F. Dimensional analysis and structural 
similitude, indirect and direct models, model materials and experimental techniques, 
individual project in structural model analysis. Bingham, Matzen 

CE 534 Plastic Analysis and Design. Preq.: CEU27. 3(3-0) S. Theory of plastic behavior 
of steel structures: concept of design for ultimate load and the use of load factors. Analysis 
and design of components of steel frames including bracings and connections. Ely, Smith 

CE 536 Theory and Design of Prestressed Concrete. Coreq.: CE U27. 3(3-0) F. The 
principles and concepts of design in prestressed concrete including elastic and ultimate 
strength analyses for flexure, shear, torsion, bond and deflection. Principles of concordancy 
and linear transformation for indeterminate prestressed structures. Application of pre- 
stressing to tanks and shells. Ahmad, Zia 

CE (MEA) 541 Gravity Wave Theory I. 3(3-0) S. (See marine, earth and atmospheric 
sciences.) 

CE 543 Hydraulics of Ground Water. Preq.: CE 382 or 3U2 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. 
Principles of ground water hydraulics; theory of flow through idealized porous media; the 
flow net solution; seepage and well problems. R. C. Borden 

CE 544 Foundation Engineering. Preq.: CE 3U2. 3(3-0) S. Subsoil investigations; exca- 
vations; design of sheeting and bracing systems; control of water; footing, grillage and pile 
foundations; caisson and cofferdam methods of construction. R. H. Borden, Lambe 

CE 548 Engineering Properties of Soils I. Preq.: CE 3U2. 3(2-3) F. The study of soil 
properties that are significant in earthwork engineering, including properties of soil solids, 
basic physiochemical concepts, classification, identification, plasticity; permeability, capil- 
larity and stabilization. Laboratory work includes classification, permeability and com- 
paction tests. R. H. Borden 

CE549 Engineering Properties of Soils II. Preq.: CE 5hS. 3(2-3) S. Continuation of CE 
548, including the study of compressibility, stress-strain relations and shear strength 
theories for soil. Laboratory work includes consolidation and shear strength tests. 

R. H. Borden 

CE 551 Theory of Concrete Mixtures. Preq.: CE 332. 3(3-0) F. A study in depth of the 
theory of portland cement concrete mixtures including types and properties of portland 
special cements; chemical reactions; brief examination of history of mixture design; 
detailed study of current design methods; properties of fresh and hardened concretes; 
strength-age-curing relationships; durability; admixtures; special concretes; production 
and quality control. Graduate Staff 

CE 553 Asphalt and Bituminous Materials. Preq.: CE 332. 3(2-3) S. A study in depth of 
properties of asphalts and tars for use in waterproofing and bituminous materials, and 
theories of design of bituminous mixtures for construction and paving uses including types 
and properties of asphalt cements, cutbacks, emulsions, blown asphalts and tars; brief 
examination of historical developments; detailed study of properties and design of bitumi- 
nous mixtures; and current research. Laboratory work includes standard tests on asphalts, 
tars and road oils; design, manufacture and testing of trial batches; and current research 
techniques. Khosla 



106 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



CE 555 Highway and Airport Pavement Design. Preq.: CE 406 or 443. 3(2-3) F. 
Theoretical analysis and design of highway and airport pavements with critical evaluation 
of current design practices. Khosla 

CE 561 Construction Planning and Scheduling. Preq.: CE 463. 3(3-0) F. Construction 
project planning, scheduling and control utilizing network methods. Both manual and 
computer techniques will be applied. Introduction to other quantitative management 
methods in construction. Utilizing the principles developed, students will bid, plan, sche- 
dule and manage a construction project under competitive conditions in a computer- 
simulated environment. Graduate Staff 

CE 562 Construction Productivity. Preq.: CE 463 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Methods of 
collecting, assembling and analyzing construction productivity data in order to increase 
construction productivity. Applications of methods improvement techniques such as time- 
lapse photography, flow charts, process charts and time standards to the improvement of 
construction productivity. Safety and human factors in construction and their relation to 
construction productivity. Graduate Staff 

CE 566 Building Construction Systems. Preq.: CE 466 or CE 427 or grad. standing in 
ARC. 3(3-0) S. Construction engineering of conventional and industrialized building sys- 
tems. Emphasis in the areas of structural systems utilizing cast-in-place concrete, precast 
concrete, prestressed concrete, structural steel, cold-formed steel, masonry, timber, com- 
posite and mixed materials. Topics include mechanisms for resisting and transmitting 
loads, detailing, fabrication, transportation, erection, stability, shoring, quality control and 
integration of service systems. Johnston 

CE (BAE, MB) 570 Sanitary Microbiology. Preq.: MB 401 or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. 
Fundamental aspects of microbiology and biochemistry are presented and related to 
problems of stream pollution, refuse disposal and biological treatment. Laboratory exer- 
cises present basic microbiological techniques and illustrate from a chemical viewpoint 
some of the basic microbial aspects of waste disposal. Chao 

CE 571 Theory of Water and Waste Treatment. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. Study 
of the basic physical and chemical processes underlying water and waste treatment, 
including mass transfer, equilibria, and kinetics. Galler 

CE 572 Design of Water and Wastewater Facilities. Preq.: CE 571. 3(3-0) S. Theory 
and design of water and wastewater treatment plants. Chao 

CE 573 Unit Operations and Processes in Waste Treatment. Preq.: CE 486; Coreq.: CE 
571. 3(1-6) F. Unit operations and processes in water and wastes engineering, including 
sedimentation, thickening, chemical coagulation, vacuum filtration, carbon adsorption, 
biological treatment, and special projects. Chao, Galler 

CE 575 Civil Engineering Systems. Preq.: MA 405. 3(3-0) S. An examination of civil 
engineering systems and their design optimization. The systems to be studied include water 
resources engineering, structural engineering, transportation engineering and construc- 
tion. Galler 

CE 576 Atmospheric Pollution. Preq.: Grad. or advanced undergrad. standing. 3(3-0) S. 
A survey of the problem of atmospheric pollution. Topics to be discussed include: pollutant 
sources; effects on man and other animals, vegetation, materials and visibility; meteorolog- 
ical factors, air sampling; control devices; air quality and emission standards; and legal, 
economic and administrative aspects. Graduate Staff 

CE (BAE) 578 Agricultural Waste Management. 3(2-3) F. (See biological and agricul- 
tural engineering.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 107 



CE 580 Flow in Open Channels. Preq.: CE 382. 3(3-0) F. The theory and applications of 
flow in open channels, including dimensional analysis, momentum-energy principle, grad- 
ually varied flow, high-velocity flow, energy dissipators, spillways, waves, channel transi- 
tions and model studies. Amein 

CE 582 Coastal Hydrodynamics. Preq.: CE 382 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Surface gravity 
waves, solitary waves, longwaves, impulsively generated waves, flow in inlets and estuar- 
ies, storm surge, wave refraction and diffraction, harbor oscillations. Overton 

CE 583 Engineering Aspects of Coastal Processes. Preq.: CE382 or equivalent; Coreq.: 
MEA (CE) 5U1. 3(3-0) S. Coastal environment, engineering aspects of the mechanics of 
sediment movement, littoral drift, beach profiles, beach stability, meteorological effects, 
tidal inlets, inlet stability, shoaling, deltas, beach nourishment, mixing processes, pollution 
of coastal waters, interaction between shore processes and man-made structures, case 
studies. Fisher 

CE 585 Urban Stormwater Management. Preq.: CE 383. 3(3-0) F. Studies of storm- 
water management in urban areas emphasizing quantitative problems in flooding, sedi- 
mentation and water quality. Review and extension of design concepts involving channels 
and impoundments. Survey of hydrographic formation techniques and examination of 
common hydrologic models. Case studies of urbanizing watersheds. Malcom 

CE 589 Special Topics in Civil Engineering. 3(3-0) F,S. New or special course on recent 
developments in some phase of civil engineering. Specific topics and prerequisites are 
identified for each section and will vary from term to term. Graduate Staff 

CE 591, 592 Civil Engineering Seminar. 11(1-0) F,S. Discussions and reports of sub- 
jects in civil engineering and allied fields. Graduate Staff 

CE 598 Civil Engineering Projects. 1-6 F,S. Research- or design-oriented independent 
study and investigation of a specific civil engineering topic, which culminates in a final 
written report. A minimum of three credits required for the MCE degree. 

Graduate Staff 
FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CE 601 Transportation Planning. Preq.: CE 502. 3(3-0) S. The planning, administra- 
tion, economics and financing of various transportation engineering facilities. Cribbins 

CE 602 Advanced Transportation Design. Preq.: CE 503. 3(2-3) F. Design of major 
traffic and transportation engineering projects. Horn 

CE 603 Airport Planning and Design. Coreq.: CE 502. 3(2-3) F. The analysis, planning 
and design of air transportation facilities. Cribbins 

CE 604 Urban Transportation Planning. Preq.: CE 502. 3(3-0) S. Planning and design 
of urban transportation systems as related to comprehensive urban planning; principles of 
land use planning, urban thoroughfare planning and regional planning. Graduate Staff 

CE 605 Traffic Flow Theory. Preqs.: CE 502, ST 515. 3(3-0) F. The theoretical tech- 
niques used to describe vehicular traffic movement on a street or highway network, 
including the use of differential-difference equations, hydrodynamic models, probabilistic 
models, and computer simulation. Graduate Staff 

CE 614 Plasticity and Limit Analysis. Preq.: CE 513 or 521. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Stress- 
strain rate relationships and theorems of limit analysis and shakedown in plastic solids. 
Application to collapse load calculations in arches, rings, plates and axisymmetric shells. 
Introduction to slip-line field theory of plane plastic flow and to dynamic limit analysis. 

Havner 



108 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



CE 615 Finite Deformation of Materials I. Preqs.: CE511 or 513, MA 512. 3(3-0) F. Alt. 
yrs. Application of the principles of classical continuum mechanics to the study of large 
deformation of solid materials. Finite strain geometry and kinematics, work-conjugate 
stress and stress-rate measures, rotating reference frames, local balance laws and jump 
conditions. Constitutive equations of nonlinearly elastic and inelastic behavior, general 
theorems for rate-type boundary value problems, conditions for bifurcation of solution. 

Havner 

CE 616 Finite Deformation of Materials II. Preq.: CE 615. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Continua- 
tion of the study of finite deformation of materials, with emphasis on metal plasticity. 
Analytical connections between constituent and aggregate behavior in heterogeneous sol- 
ids. Kinematics of crystals, theories of slip-system hardening, existence of plastic poten- 
tials. Physical and mathematical justification for the normality postulate in polycrystalline 
plasticity. Considerations of experiment, analysis of various mechanical tests at finite 
strain. Havner 

CE 618 Optical Mechanics. Preq.: CE 311. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. Concepts of crystal optics 
applied to continua deformed statically or dynamically by mechanical loading; optical 
interference and its use as a measuring technique of absolute and relative retardations in 
various types of interferometers; relative retardation measurements; deformation mea- 
surements with diffraction grating; Moire (mechanical) interference measurements. 

Bingham 

CE 619 Experimental Methods in Mechanics. Preq.: CI. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. A study of 
specialized experimental techniques utilized in contemporary research in the areas of 
mechanics. Bingham, Douglas 

CE 620 Numerical Methods in Structural Mechanics. Preqs.: CE 525 and CE 521 or 

CE 513. 3(3-0) F. Finite difference and finite element methods in two- and three- 
dimensional elastic structures, including plates, plane stress and plane strain problems, 
axisymmetric solids. Analytical basis of approximations: series expansions; energy theo- 
rems; virtual work. Matrix decompositions and iteration techniques for digital computer 
solution. Introduction to nonlinear analysis. Havner 

CE 623 Theory of Plates and Shells. Preq.: CE 513 or CE 521. 3(3-0) F. Small and large 
deflection theories of thin plates; membrane analysis of shells. Various methods of analysis 
are discussed and illustrated by problems of practical interest. Gupta 

CE 624 Analysis and Design of Structural Shells and Folded Plates. Preq.: CE 623. 
3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Treatment of roof structures in the form of folded and curved surfaces. 
Membrane and bending stress analysis of folded plates, shells of revolution, cylindrical and 
conical shells and free-form systems. Numerical and closed form solutions. Design criteria 
for concrete and metallic structures. Gupta 

CE 625, 626 Advanced Structural Design I, II. Preqs.: (625): CEU27, CE 525; (626) CE 
U27; Coreqs.: (626) CE 525, 526. (625) 3(3-0) S. (626) 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. Complete structural 
design of a variety of projects including comparative study of alternative solutions. Discus- 
sions of long span structural systems. Graduate Staff 

CE 627 Advanced Analysis and Design of Structures for Dynamic Loads. Preq.: CE 
527. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Consideration of the following advanced topics in the analysis and 
design of structures for dynamic loads: eigenvalue routines and numerical integration 
techniques; response analysis through the frequency domain; investigation of damping; 
variational formulation of the equations of motion; analysis and design of continuous 
systems; approximate methods of analysis; and special topics. Matzen 

CE 628 Earthquake Structural Engineering. Preq.: CE 527. 3(3-0) S. Study of the 
effects of earthquakes on structures and of the design of structures to resist earthquake 
motions; earthquake mechanisms and ground motions; response of structures to earth- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 109 



quake motions; behavior of materials, structural elements and assemblages subjected to 
earthquakes; principles of earthquake-resistant design practice; soil-structure interac- 
tions; and special topics. Gupta, Nau 

CE 632 Probabilistic Methods of Structural Engineering. Preqs.: CE 525 and MA 
b21. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Application of probability theory and stochastic processes to the 
study of safety of structures. Fundamentals of probability theory and stochastic processes; 
probabilistic modelings of structural loadings, material properties and risk. Reliability 
analysis of structures; reliability-based design criteria. Random vibration of simple struc- 
tures; safety analysis of structures under dynamic loads. Tung 

CE 635 Advanced Theory of Concrete Structures. Preq.: CE 536. 3(3-0) S. Inelastic 
theory of structural concrete members under flexure, axial load, combined flexure and 
axial compression, shear and torsion. Yield line theory of slabs. Limit analysis of beams and 
frames of reinforced and prestressed concrete. Ahmad, Zia 

CE 641, 642 Advanced Soil Mechanics. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Theories of 
soil mechanics; failure conditions; mechanical interaction between solids and water, and 
problems in elasticity and plasticity pertaining to earthwork engineering. Wahls 



CE 644 Ground Water Engineering. Preq.: CE 5U3 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Ground 
water problems as related to engineering works, ground water circulation and inventories, 
subsidence of the ground and its evaluation due to pumping, method of images applied to 
water circulation of wastes and salt water encroachment in coastal aquifers, transient flow 
systems in wells and earth dams and embankments. Leakage problems, practical ground 
water problems and their analysis by computers and electrical models. The legal aspects of 
ground water conservation and the implied technical and engineering phases. 

R. C. Borden 

CE 646 Dynamics of Soils and Foundations. Preq.: CE 6U1. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The 
application of vibration and wave propagation theories to soil media; the review of existing 
experimental data and empirical procedures for analysis of foundation vibrations, the 
prediction of soil responses to impulse loads, dynamic properties of soils and methods for 
their determination, design procedures for foundation subjected to dynamic forces. 

Rahman, Wahls 

CE 665 Construction Equipment Systems. Preq.: CE561 or CE 562 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
S. Analysis of earthmoving and other heavy construction processes as systems in order to 
optimize the selection and employment of construction equipment. Considerations in sys- 
tem design, cost and productivity estimation, operational procedures, safety, and mainte- 
nance. Computer applications utilizing analytical and simulation techniques. 

Graduate Staff 

CE 671 Advanced Water Management Systems. Preq.: CE U8U; Coreqs.: CE 571, 573. 
U(3-3) F. The application of systems analysis methods to the design, analysis and manage- 
ment of water and waste systems. Galler 

CE 672 Advanced Water and Waste Treatment: Principles and Design. Preq.: CE 
571. U(3-3) S>. Theory and design of physiochemical processes used to control phosphorus, 
nitrogen, trace metals and toxic organic substances in water. Galler 

CE 673 Industrial Water Supply and Waste Disposal. Coreq.: CE 571. 3(3-0) F. Water 
requirements of industry and the disposal of industries wastes. Graduate Staff 

CE 674 Stream Sanitation. Coreq.: CE571. 3(3-0) S. Biological, chemical and hydrologi- 
cal factors that affect stream sanitation and stream use. Graduate Staff 



110 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



CE 681 Behavior and Analysis of Ocean Structures. Preq.: CE 527. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Introduction to linear and random water waves, analysis of wave forces on small bodies, 
analysis of wave forces on large bodies, response of offshore structures to waves and 
earthquake loadings, mooring dynamics. Tung 

CE 685 Design of Coastal Facilities. Preqs.: CE 582 and CE 583. 3(3-0) F. Types and 
functions of coastal structures, computation of wave forces on coastal structures, wave 
uprush, shore protection against waves and storms, planning and design of navigation 
channels, port development, harbor design, dredging technology, planning and design of 
offshore platforms, technology of disposal of wastes and heated discharge, consideration of 
environmental effects of waste disposal. Fisher 

CE 687 Numerical Modeling for Nearshore Flow Systems. Preq.: CE 580 or CE 582 or 

ME A (CE) 541 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Basic concepts of finite difference methods, methods 
of characteristics, estuarine and inlet flow computations, implicit methods, surge on the 
open coast. Introduction to circulation in sounds and bays, modeling of ocean circulation, 
modeling of sediment movement, mixing processes, water quality modeling. Amein 

CE 689 Advanced Topics in Civil Engineering. 3(3-0) F.S. New or special course on 
advanced developments in some phase of civil engineering. Specific topics and prerequi- 
sites are identified for each section and will vary from term to term. Graduate Staff 

CE 698 Advanced Reading in Civil Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. 
Directed reading of advanced topics in some phase of civil engineering. Graduate Staff 

CE 699 Civil Engineering Research. Credits Arranged. F,S. Independent investigation 
of an advanced civil engineering problem; a report of such an investigation is required as a 
graduate thesis. Graduate Staff 



Computer Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. E. Funderlic, Head 

Professors: W. Chou, D. C. Martin, L. B. Martin, D. F. McAllister, W. J. Stewart, 
K.-C. Tai, A. L. Tharp; Professor Emeritus: P. E. Lewis; Associate Professors: 
E. W. Davis Jr., R. J. Fornaro, T. L. Honeycutt, H. G. Perros, W. E. Robbins, R. 
D. Rodman, C. D. Savage; Visiting Associate Professors: H. M. Abdel-Wahab, 
J. A. Bowen; Assistant Professors: D. R. Bahler, S. H. Bloomberg, N. M. 
Bengston, G. Y. Fletcher, E. F. Gehringer, J. Mauney, D. S. Reeves, M. F. M. 
Stallman, N. F. Williamson Jr.; Visiting Assistant Professor: M. A. Vouk; 
Assistant Professor Emeritus: J. W. Hanson 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 
Professor: C. D. Meyer Jr.; Associate Professor: W. J. Rasdorf 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 111 



The Department of Computer Science offers a graduate program with empha- 
sis areas in computer systems architecture, software systems, artificial intelli- 
gence, computer communications and computer performance evaluation. The 
program's core requirements emphasize a cooperative effort between computer 
science and engineering and reflect a narrowing gap between software and 
hardware. Faculty members from the Department of Electrical and Computer 
Engineering (ECE) participate in the program and are actively involved in 
teaching, research and advising in the various emphasis areas. Both the M.S. and 
Ph.D. degree programs are offered. The doctorate is a joint and cooperative 
program offered in conjunction with the ECE Department. Applicants should 
have a strong background in computer science, engineering, mathematics, sta- 
tistics or the physical sciences, and a working knowledge of an appropriate 
higher-level programming language, such as PASCAL or PL/1. Students lack- 
ing necessary background will be required to take courses which eliminate the 
deficiencies in addition to their normal program of study. Research and teaching 
assistantships are available to qualified applicants. Cooperative master's and 
Ph.D. programs are also available with the Departments of Mathematics, Statis- 
tics and Operations Research. 

The Department of Computer Science offers a minor program for graduate 
students majoring in other fields. For a candidate for a master's degree, three 
courses are required with at least one course at the 500 level or above. For a Ph.D. 
candidate, no specific courses are required, but the student is expected to achieve 
a high level of proficiency in at least one of these five areas of computer science: 
foundations, computer systems, numerical processing, programming languages 
(including compiler design) and information systems. The student's advisory 
committee, in conjunction with the computer science graduate administrator, 
will assist in selecting a meaningful sequence of courses. 

Artificial Intelligence Minor 

Graduate students from outside of the Computer Science Department wishing 
to minor in Artificial Intelligence should consult this catalogue under Artificial 
Intelligence. The following Computer Science/Computer Studies courses may be 
taken in partial fulfillment of the minor in Artificial Intelligence: CSE 502, CSE 
511, ECE (CSE) 559, CSC (CSE, ECE, IE) 575, CSE 602, CSE 611, CSC (CSE. 
ECE, IE) 675. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CSC 412 Introduction to Computability, Languages and Automata. Preq.: CSC 322. 
3(3-0) F,S. 

CSC (MA) 416 Introduction to Combinatorics. Preq.: MA A03 or CSC 322. 3(3-0) Alt. 
yrs. 

CSC 421 Introduction to Management Information Systems. Preq.: CSC 311. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC (MA) 427 Introduction to Numerical Analysis I. Preqs.: MA 301 or MA 312 and 

programming language proficiency. 3(3-0) F. 



112 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



CSC (MA) 428 Introduction to Numerical Analysis II. Preqs.: MA U05 and program- 
in ing language proficiency. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC 431 File Organization and Processing. Preq.: CSC 311. 3(3-0) S. 

CSC 441 Introduction to Simulation. Preqs.: Proficiency in a programming language, 
MA 202, ST 872. 8(8-0) F,S. 

CSC 451 Operating Systems. Preqs.: CSC 202, 256, 311. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC 461 Computer Graphics. Preqs.: MA 202 or MA 212; CSC 101 or CSC 111. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC 471 Programming Environments. Preqs.: CSC 202, CSC 311. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC 495 Special Topics in Computer Science. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. 

CSC 499 Undergraduate Research in Computer Science. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CSC (CSE, ECE) 501 Design of Systems Programs. 3(3-0) F. (See computer studies.) 

CSC 504 Application of Linguistic Techniques to Computer Problems. Preq.: CSE 
502. 3(3-0) S. Semiotics and programming languages. Comparison of semantic theories. 
Representation, classification and interpretation of scenes and other multidimensional 
illustrations. Design of a formal language for describing two-dimensional geometric fig- 
ures, such as flowcharts, chemical structures and logic diagrams. Characterization of 
programming languages according to the theory of transformational grammar. 

CSC (CSE, ECE) 506 Digital Systems Architecture. 3(3-0) F. (See computer studies.) 

CSC (CSE, ECE) 510 Software Engineering. 3(3-0) F. (See computer studies.) 

CSC (CSE, ECE) 512 Compiler Construction. 3(3-0) S. (See computer studies.) 

CSC (CSE, ECE) 518 Computer Graphics. 3(3-0). (See computer studies.) 

CSC 541 Advanced Data Structures. Preq.: CSC 311 or CSEA53. 3(3-0) F. Complex and 
specialized data structures relevant to the design and development of effective and efficient 
software. Hardware characteristics of storage media. Primary file organizations. Hashing 
functions and collision resolution techniques. Low level and bit level structures including 
signatures, superimposed coding, disjoint coding and Bloom filters. Tree and related 
structures including AVI trees, B-trees, tries and dynamic hashing techniques. 

CSC (CSE, ECE) 542 Database Management. 3(3-0) F. (See computer studies.) 

CSC (CSE, ECE, IE, OR) 562 Computer Simulation Techniques. 3(3-0) F. (See com- 
puter studies.) 

CSC (CSE, ECE) 571 Data Transmission/Communications. 3(3-0) S. (See computer 
studies.) 

CSC (CSE, ECE) 572 Computer Communications. 3(3-0) F. (See computer studies.) 

CSC (CSE, ECE) 573 Introduction to Computer Performance Modelling. 8(8-0) F. 

(See computer studies.) 

CSC (CSE, ECE) 574 Real Time Computer Systems. 3(3-0) S, Alt. yrs. (See computer 
studies.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 113 



CSC (CSE, ECE, IE) 575 Voice Input/Output Communication Systems. 3(3-0) F. (See 
industrial engineering.) 

CSC (MA) 582 Numerical Linear Analysis. Preqs.: MA U05 or equivalent and a knowl- 
edge of computer programming. 3(3-0) F. A mathematical and numerical investigation of 
direct iterative and semi-iterative methods for the solution of linear systems. Methods for 
the calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices. 

CSC (MA) 583 Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations. Preq.: 
Knowledge to the level of CSC 427. 3(3-0) S. Numerical methods for initial value problem 
including predictor-corrector, Runge-Kutta, hybrid and extrapolation methods; stiff sys- 
tems; shooting methods for two-point boundary value problems; weak, absolute and relative 
stability results. 

CSC (MA) 584 Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations— Finite Dif- 
ference Methods. Preq.: Knowledge to the level of CSC U27-U28. 3(3-0) F,S. Numerical 
methods for the solutions of parabolic, elliptic and hyperbolic partial differential equations 
including stability and convergence results. 

CSC (MA, OR) 585 Graph Theory. Preq.: MA A05. 3(3-0) F. Basic concepts of graph 
theory. Trees and forests. Vector spaces associated with a graph. Representation of graphs 
by binary matrices and list structures. Traversability. Connectivity. Matching and 
assignment problems. Planar graphs. Colorability. Directed graphs. Applications of graph 
theory with emphasis on organizing problems in a form suitable for computer solution. 

CSC (MA) 587 Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations— Finite Ele- 
ment Method. 3(3-0) S. (See mathematics.) 

CSC 595 Special Topics. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. Topics of current interest in computer 
science not covered in existing courses. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CSC (CSE, ECE) 671 Advanced Computer Performance Modelling. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. (See computer studies.) 

CSC (CSE, ECE, IE) 675 Advances in Voice Input/Output Communications Sys- 
tems. 3(2-3) S. (See industrial engineering.) 

Computer Studies 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor Wushow Chou, Program Director 

Professor W. J. Stewart, Associate Director 

Professors: D. P. Agrawal, W. E. Alexander, R. E. Funderlic, W. S. Galler, H. J. 
Gold, D. C. Martin, L. B. Martin, D. F. McAllister, H. T. Nagle Jr., A. A. 
Nilsson, J. B. O'Neal Jr., R. J. Plemmons, R. S. Sowell, R. E. Stinner, K.-C. Tai, 
A. L. Tharp, H. J. Trussell; Adjunct Professor: J. R. Suttle; Professor Emeritus: 
P. E. Lewis; Associate Professors: S. T. Alexander, E. W. Davis Jr., R. J. 
Fornaro, T. L. Honeycutt, H. D. Levin, R.-C. Luo, H. G. Perros, S. A. Rajala, W. 
E. Robbins, R. D. Rodman, C. D. Savage, J. C. Smith, W. E. Snyder, H. J. 
Trussell; Visiting Associate Professors: H. M. Abdel-Wahab, J. A. Bowen; 



114 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Assistant Professors: D. R. Bahler, N. M. Bengtson, S. H. Bloomberg, G. Y. 
Fletcher, E. F. Gehringer, W.-T. Liu, J. Mauney, T. K. Miller III, D. S. Reeves, 
M. F. M. Stallmann, N. F. Williamson; Visiting Assistant Professor: M. A. 
Vouk 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 
Professor: C. D. Meyer Jr.; Associate Professor: W. J. Rasdorf 

The computer studies program is an interdisciplinary graduate program 
which is administered by the Department of Computer Science, with participa- 
tion by faculty members primarily from computer science, electrical and compu- 
ter engineering and operations research. 

The program integrates the computer software oriented curriculum of the 
Department of Computer Science and the computer hardware oriented curricu- 
lum from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering into a single 
curriculum. This is in contrast to the traditional arrangement in which the 
curriculum in an independent computer science department emphasizes soft- 
ware systems and computing theory while the computer engineering curriculum 
in an electrical and computer engineering department emphasizes hardware 
systems. The need for the merging of these two types of curricula has been 
recognized by several other schools through cross-listed courses and joint degree 
programs. North Carolina State University takes a more positive step by creat- 
ing a single administrative unit to incorporate the curricula at the graduate level. 

Although courses and thesis topics may be chosen in a variety of fields, this 
program's unique strength lies with the fields combining computer science and 
computer engineering. These fields include: computer system architecture and 
design, computer communications and numerical and optimization techniques. 

The field of computer system architecture and design deals with the specifica- 
tion, design and analysis of digital systems, including the study of system archi- 
tecture, design algorithms and automation, fault tolerant design and simulation. 
The field of computer communications deals with the methodology of utilizing 
the state-of-the-art capability of computers and telecommunications for reliable, 
economic and responsive transfer of digitized information among data transmis- 
sion equipment, which may be various computers, terminals or telephones with 
digitized voices. The field of numerical and optimization techniques is concerned 
with the study of the structure and properties of systems with large numbers of 
interdependent variables, and with the methodology and application of numeri- 
cal analysis, dynamical systems theory and systems analysis and mathematical 
programming of such systems. 

For students pursuing a master's degree in computer studies, there are two 
options: the thesis option, the Master of Science in computer studies and the 
non-thesis option, the Master of Computer Studies. 

Remedial Courses 

The immigration modules, CSE 452 through CSE 456, are the remedial 
courses that are structured primarily for students with a bachelor's degree in one 
of the quantitative sciences, but with little computer background. However, 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 115 

proficiency in a high-level programming language is assumed. Each module 
provides in a condensed format the prerequisite knowledge for most first year 
graduate courses in the program. Each entering student would select, upon 
advice of the program faculty, those immigration modules necessary to eliminate 
deficiencies relevant to the program of study. Credit toward satisfying degree 
requirements for computer studies majors would not be allowed for the immigra- 
tion modules. 

Core Courses 

Three core courses, CSE (CSC, ECE) 501, Design of Systems Programs, CSE. 
505, Design and Analysis of Algorithms and CSE (CSC, ECE) 506, Digital 
Systems Architecture, are intended to provide a thorough basic knowledge upon 
which the elective courses may be built. For the non-thesis option, all three are 
required. For the thesis option, CSE (CSC, ECE) 506 is required and a student 
may elect either CSE (CSC, ECE) 501 or CSE 505 as the second core course. 

Elective Courses 

All other courses listed below are elective courses. For classification of the 
elective courses according to subject areas and for further details, refer to the 
computer studies brochure. 

Artificial Intelligence Minor 

Graduate students from outside of the Computer Studies Department wishing 
to minor in Artificial Intelligence should consult this catalogue under Artificial 
Intelligence. The following Computer Studies courses may be taken in partial 
fulfillment of the minor in Artificial Intelligence: CSE 502, CSE 511, ECE (CSE) 
559, CSC (CSE, ECE, IE) 575, CSE 602, CSE 611, CSC (CSE, ECE, IE) 675. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CSE 452 Assembly Language and Basic Computer Organization. Preqs.: Higher level 
programming language and CI. 1(1-0) F,S,Sum. 

CSE 453 Data Structures. Preqs.: Higher level programming language and CI; Coreq.: 
CSE Jk52 or equivalent. 1(1-0) F,S,Sum. 

CSE 454 Computer Organization and Logic. Preqs.: CSE 1*52 or equivalent and CI. 
1(1-0) F,S,Sum. 

CSE 455 Applied Algebraic Structures. Preqs.: MA 201, higher level programming 
language and CI. 1(1-0) F. 

CSE 456 Introduction to Computability. Preqs.: CSE U55 or equivalent and CI. 1(1-0) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CSE (CSC, ECE) 501 Design of Systems Programs. Preqs.: CSE U52 and CSE U53. 
3(3-0) F,S. Fundamentals of translators, operating systems and file management systems. 
Assemblers, macro processors, linkers and loaders. Sequential and concurrent processes, 
processor and memory management. File structures and file indexing techniques, includ- 
ing hashing, B-trees, AVL trees and tries. 



116 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



CSE 502 Computational Linguistics. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F. Natural language processing 
by computer. Finite-state, context-free, context-sensitive and transformational grammars. 
Parsing mechanisms including augmented transition networks. Analysis of complex Eng- 
lish sentences. Question-answering systems. 

CSE 505 Design and Analysis of Algorithms. Preq.: CSC 311 or CSE 453. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Study of techniques for the design of algorithms. Complexity and analysis of algorithms. 
Study of algorithms for certain classical problems that include sorting, searching, graphs, 
numerical algorithms and pattern matching. 

CSE (CSC, ECE) 506 Digital Systems Architecture. Preq.: ECE 31*0 or CSC 312 or 
CSE U5U- 3(3-0) F,S. Digital systems architecture is the middle ground on which the 
interests of software, hardware and firmware come together. Among the topics considered 
are: architectural descriptions, storage systems, I/O systems, stack machines and paralle- 
lism. The structure of digital systems implementation will also be considered as it relates to 
architecture. 

CSE (CSC, ECE) 510 Software Engineering. Preqs.: CSC 311 and CSC 322 or CSE U53 

and CSE U55 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. The course will introduce the principles and methods 
for the design, coding and validation of software systems. Among the topics covered are: 
software design techniques, programming methodology, program testing, proofs of pro- 
gram correctness, software reliability and software management. 

CSE 511 Artificial Intelligence I. Preq.: CSC 311 and either CSC 322 or PHI 201 or PHI 

335 or background in symbolic logic. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to and overview of artificial 
intelligence. Study of an AI programming language such as LISP or PROLOG. Elements of 
AI problem-solving techniques. State spaces and search techniques. Logic, theorem prov- 
ing and associative databases. Introduction to knowledge representation, expert systems- 
and selected topics including natural language processing, vision and robotics. 

CSE (CSC, ECE) 512 Compiler Construction. Preq.: CSC 311 or CSE 453. 3(3-0) S. This 
course is intended to provide a detailed understanding of the techniques used in the design 
and implementation of compilers. Introduction to formal grammars and relations concern- 
ing a grammar. Detailed study of algorithms for lexical scanners, top-down recognizers, 
bottom-up recognizers for simple precedence grammars, operator precedence grammars, 
high order precedence grammars and bounded-context grammars. Runtime storage 
organization for a compiler including symbol tables, internal forms for source programs, 
semantic routines, error recovery and diagnostics, code generation and optimization and 
interpreters. 

CSE (ECE) 513 Digital Signal Processing, .'t 023(3-0) F. (See electrical and computer 
engineering.) 

CSE (ECE) 514 Random Processes. 3(3-0) F. (See electrical and computer engi- 
neering.) 

CSE (CSC, ECE) 518 Computer Graphics. Preqs.: MA U05, knowledge of FORTRAN 
and PASCAL. 3(3-0) F. Clipping, windowing, transformations, projections, hiddenline and 
surface removal, smooth shading, shadowing, translucence, reflection, refraction, curve 
and surface representation. 

CSE (ECE) 520 Fundamentals of Logic Systems. 3(3-0) F. (See electrical and compu- 
ter engineering.) 

CSE (ECE) 521 Digital Computer Technology and Design. 3(3-0) F,S. (See electrical 
and computer engineering.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 117 



CSE 522 Formal Languages and Syntactic Analysis. Preq.: CSC 412 (CSE 512 
recommended). 3(3-0) F. Detailed study of formal languages and their relation to automata: 
languages and their representation, grammars, finite automata and regular grammars, 
context-free grammars and pushdown automata, type grammars and Turing machines, 
the Halting Problem, context-sensitive grammars and linear bounded automata and opera- 
tions of languages. 

CSE (MA) 529, 530 Numerical Analysis I, II. 3(3-0) F,S. (See mathematics.) 

CSE (ECE) 533 Digital Electronics. 3(3-0) S. (See electrical and computer engi- 
neering.) 

CSE (CSC, ECE) 542 Database Management. Preq.: CSC 431 or CSE (CSC, ECE) 501. 
3(3-0) F. The course covers the fundamentals of the area of database management. Basic 
topics include: general architecture for database management systems; current data mod- 
els such as network, relational, hierarchical; security and integrity; discussion of current 
implemented systems. 

CSE (ECE) 558 Image Processing. 3(3-0) Every yr. (See electrical and computer 
engineering.) 

CSE (ECE) 559 Pattern Recognition. 3(3-0) S. (See electrical and computer engi- 
neering.) 

CSE (CSC, ECE, OR, IE) 562 Computer Simulation Techniques. Preqs.: ST 516 and a 
scientific programming language. 3(3-0) F. Basic discrete event simulation methodology: 
random number generators, simulation designs, validation, analysis of simulation output. 
Applications to various areas of scientific modeling. Simulation language such as SLAM 
and GPSS. Computer assignments and projects. 

CSE (CSC, ECE) 571 Data Transmission/Communications. Preqs.: CSE 454 or CSC 

312 or ECE 340; CSE 459 or ECE 301. 3(3-0) S. Deals with the principles and techniques of 
moving digital data through transmission facilities. To be covered: digital information 
representation; characteristics of channels; modulation and demodulation (MODEM) 
techniques; error detection and correction; line control procedure; circuit, message and 
packet switching; multiplexors and concentrators. 

CSE (CSC, ECE) 572 Computer Communications. Pre?.: CSC 312 or ECE 340 or CSE 

454; Coreq.: B average in technical subjects. 3(3-0) F. The purpose of this course is to enable 
the student to understand the principles, the control and operations and the potential of 
computer communication systems; to present techniques for topological design and ana- 
lytic modeling of such systems; and to provide the foundation for more detailed studies and 
research. The courses are self-contained and focus on practical applications of state-of-art 
techniques. 

CSE (CSC, ECE) 573 Introduction to Computer Performance Modelling. Preqs.: 
CSE 454, MA 421; Coreq.: CSE 501. 3(3-0) F. Workload characterization, collection and 
analysis of performance data, instrumentation, tuning, analytic models including queueing 
network models and operational analysis, economic considerations. 

CSE (CSC, ECE) 574 Real Time Computer Systems. Preq.: CSC 405 or CSE (CSC, 
ECE) 501. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Hardware and software characteristics of computer systems 
designed to meet specific response time requirements are studied. Topics include allocation 
of system resources including processor memory, disk, support I/O devices; synchronous 
and asynchronous event scheduling; effect of interrupts; static and dynamic priorities; 
implementation of queues; measurement of performance, especially scheduling and 
response accuracy. 



118 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



CSE (CSC, ECE, IE) 575 Voice Input/Output Communication Systems. 3(8-0) F. (See 
industrial engineering.) 

CSE 591 Special Topics in Computer Studies. Preqs.: B average in technical subjects 
and CI. 3(3-0) F,S. Topics of current interest in computer studies not covered in existing 
courses. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CSE 602 Computational Semantics. Preqs.: CSE 502 and CSC 322 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
F. An examination of how to represent meaning in natural language to a computer. Logical 
systems for representing meaning. Other systems for representing meaning such as con- 
ceptual dependencies. Generating natural language output from data bases representing 
knowledge. Reading of advanced material in such areas as natural language dialogue 
processing. 

CSE (OR) 605 Large Scale Linear Programming Systems. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See 
operations research.) 

CSE 611 Artificial Intelligence II. Preq.: CSE 511. 3(3-0) S. This is a second course in 
artificial intelligence emphasizing advanced concepts of AI including logic programming, 
automatic programming, natural language understanding, visual perception by machine, 
learning and inference, intelligent computer-aided instruction, knowledge representation, 
robotics and other topics to be chosen by the instructor. Students will be asked to write 
programs in an AI programming language such as LISP and PROLOG. 

CSE (ECE) 640 Advanced Logic Systems. 3(3-0) S. (See electrical and computer 
engineering.) 

CSE (ECE) 641 Sequential Machines. 3(3-0) F. (See electrical and computer engi- 
neering.) 

CSE (ECE) 651 Statistical Communication Theory. 3(3-0) S. (See electrical and com- 
puter engineering.) 

CSE (ECE) 652 Information Theory. 3(3-0) F. (See electrical and computer engi- 
neering.) 

CSE (ECE) 659 Computer Vision. 3(3-0) F. (See electrical and computer engineering.) 

CSE (IE.OR) 662 Stochastic Simulation Design and Analysis. Preqs.: CSE (CSC, 
ECE, IE, OR) 562 and ST 516. 3(3-0) S. Advanced topics in stochastic system simulation are 
covered, including random variate generation, output estimation for stationary and nonsta- 
tionary models, performance optimization techniques, variance reduction approaches. 
Students apply these techniques to actual simulations. A paper written on a current 
research topic is required. 

CSE (CSC, ECE) 671 Advanced Computer Performance Modelling. Preqs.: CSE 
(CSC, ECE) 573 or OR (IE) 561. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. In-depth study of computer performance 
modelling techniques such as exact and approximate analysis of queueing networks and 
direct and iterative numerical solutions of queueing systems. 

CSE (CSC, ECE, IE) 675 Advances in Voice Input/Output Communications Sys- 
tems. 3(2-3) S.. (See industrial engineering.) 

CSE 691 Advanced Topics in Computer Studies. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Advanced topics of current interest in computer studies not covered by existing courses. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 119 



CSE 693 Individual Topics in Computer Studies. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. 1-3 F,S. 
An opportunity for an individual graduate student to investigate special topics of interest 
under the direction of members of the graduate faculty. 

CSE 695 Seminar in Computer Studies. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. 1(1-0) F,S. Seminar 
discussion of problems of current research interests in computer studies. Seminar speakers 
consist of advanced graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers. 

CSE 699 Computer Studies Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. Credits Arranged. 
F,S. Individual research by graduate students minoring and majoring in computer studies. 
Research may be done under the supervision of CSE faculty members meeting the interest 
and need of the student. 

Counselor Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see counselor 
education under education. 



Crop Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor B. E. Caldwell, Head 

Professor D. A. Emery, Coordinator of Graduate Programs 

Professors: D. S. Chamblee, H. D. Coble, W. K. Collins, F. T. Corbin, E. J. 
Dunphy, W. T. Fike, M. M. Goodman, J. T. Green Jr., H. D. Gross, W. M. Lewis, 
R. C. Long, J. P. Mueller, R. P. Patterson, G. F. Peedin, T. J. Sheets, G. A. 
Sullivan, D. H. Timothy, J. B. Weber, W. W. Weeks, E. A. Wernsman, A. D. 
Worsham, J. C. Wynne; Professors (USDA): J. C. Burns, J. W. Burton, G. R. 
Gwynn, S. C. Huber, D. E. Moreland, H. Seltmann, R. F. Wilson; Adjunct 
Professors: D. T. Patterson, L. Thompson Jr.; Professors Emeriti: C. T. Blake, 
C. A. Brim, J. F. Chaplin, W. A. Cope, D. U. Gerstel, W. B. Gilbert, W. C. 
Gregory, P. H. Harvey, G. L. Jones, J. A. Lee, R. P. Moore, L. L. Phillips, D. L. 
Thompson, J. A. Weybrew; Associate Professors: J. R. Anderson Jr., D. T. 
Bowman, J. M. DiPaola, R. D. Keys, H. M. Linkler, H. T. Stalker Jr., A. C. 
York; Associate Professors (USDA): T. E. Carter Jr., J. E. Miller; Assistant 
Professors: A. H. Bruneau, D. A. Danehower, J. P. Murphy, S. M. Reed, R. C. 
Rufty, W. D. Smith, M. G. Wagger, G. G. Wilkerson; Assistant Professors 
(USDA): J. M. Anderson, K. 0. Burkey, D. Fisher, P. Kwanyuen, T. W. Rufty 
Jr., P. H. SiscoJr. 

The Department of Crop Science offers instruction leading to the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the fields of plant breeding, crop 
production and physiology, forage crops ecology, weed control and plant chemis- 
try. For students who wish general training, the Master of Agriculture is offered. 



120 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Excellent facilities for graduate training are available. Many special facilities 
such as preparation rooms for plant and soil samples, cold storage facilities for 
plant material, greenhouse space, growth control chambers and access to compu- 
ter facilities and the plant environment laboratory (Phytotron) are provided if 
required. Sixteen farms are owned and operated by the State for research 
investigations. Research farms are located throughout North Carolina and 
include a variety of soil and climatic conditions needed for experiments in plant 
breeding, crop management, forage ecology and weed control. 

Strong supporting departments increase opportunities for broad and thorough 
training. Among the departments in which graduate students in crop science 
work cooperatively or obtain instruction are Biochemistry, Botany, Chemistry, 
Computer Science, Entomology, Horticultural Science, Genetics, Mathematics, 
Microbiology, Plant Pathology, Soil Science and Statistics. 

In North Carolina, a state which derives a major portion of its agricultural 
income from farm crops, the opportunities for the well-trained agronomist are 
great. Recipients of advanced degrees in crop science at North Carolina State 
University are found in positions of leadership in research and education 
throughout the nation and the world. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CS 41 1 Environmental Aspects of Crop Production. Preq.: BO 421. 2(2-0) F. 

CS 413 Plant Breeding. Preq.: GN 411. 2(2-0) S. 

CS 4 14 Weed Science. Preq.: CH 220. 4(3-2) F. 

CS (SSC) 462 Soil-Crop Management Systems. Preqs.: CS211, CS4U, SSC 841, SSC 
342, SSC 352, Sr. standing. 3(2-3) S. 

CS 490 Senior Seminar in Crop Science. Preq.: Sr. in crop science or related field. 1(1-0) 
S. 

CS (HS) 492 Topics in Plant Breeding. 1(0-2) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CS 511 Tobacco Technology. Preq.: BO 421 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. A study of special 
problems concerned with the tobacco crop. The latest research problems and findings 
dealing with this important cash crop will be discussed. Peedin 

CS 513 Physiological Aspects of Crop Production. Preq.: BO 421. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Discussion will emphasize pertinent physiological processes associated with crops and crop 
management such as plant growth, maturation, respiration and photoperiodism. Relation- 
ship of the environment to maximum crop yields will be discussed. Fike 

CS (HS) 514 Principles and Methods in Weed Science. Preq.: CS 414 or equivalent. 
3(2-2) S. Studies of the losses caused by the ecology of weeds, biological control, basic 
concepts of weed management, herbicide-crop relationships and herbicide development. 
Introduction to greenhouse and bioassay techniques and field research techniques. 

Monaco 

CS (BO, ENT, PM, PP) 525 Biological Control. 4(3-3) Alt. F. (See pest management.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 121 



CS (GN, HS) 541 Plant Breeding Methods. Preqs.: GN 506, ST 511. 3(3-0) F. An 
advanced study of methods of plant breeding as related to principles and concepts of 
inheritance. Murphy, Wehner 

CS (GN) 545 Origin and Evolution of Cultivated Plants. Preq.: GN 505 or GN(ZO) 5U0. 
3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Review of progression to modern evolutionary thought; concepts of 
speciation and classification; origin of variation in plants; theories relating to origins of 
cultivation and spread of agriculture variation patterns and special attributes of cultigens; 
interactions of crops and environments; evolution under domestication; modern aspects of 
evolution as related to breeding. Stalker 

CS (BO, GN, HS) 547 Cell and Tissue Techniques in Plant Breeding. Preqs.: GN505B 
and GN 506B or equivalent. 3(l-U)F.Alt. yrs. Applications of tissue culture and cytogenetic 
techniques for plant improvement. Callus and suspension cultures, plant regeneration, in 
vitro selection, haploidy, polyploidy, aneuploidy, wide hybridization and embryo rescue. 
Practical lab experiences in tissue culture and cytogenetic techniques. Reed, Stalker 

CS 591 Special Problems. Preq.: CI. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. Special problems in 
various phases of crop science. Problems may be selected or will be assigned. Emphasis will 
be placed on review of recent and current research. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY* 

CS 611 Metabolism and Crop Productivity. Preqs.: BCHU51; BO 551 or 552. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. A comprehensive examination of bnasic metabolic processes related to germina- 
tion, cell wall formation, carbon and nitrogen utilization, and macromolecular biosynthesis 
and partitioning, and how these processes interact with plant genotype and environment to 
affect growth, development and dry matter accumulation in crop plants. Long 

CS (HS, SSC) 614 Herbicide Behavior in Plants and Soils. Preqs.: BO 551 and CH223 
or CI. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. The chemical and physiological processes involved in the behavior 
of herbicides in plants and soils will be examined. Topics to be discussed include absorption, 
translocation, metabolism and mechanisms of action of herbicides on plants; reactions, 
movement and degradation of herbicides in the soil; and interactions among herbicides and 
other pesticides. Weber 

CS (GN, HS) 615 Quantitative Genetics in Plant Breeding. Preqs.: CS (GN, HS) 5U, 
ST 512, course in quantitative genetics recommended. 1(1-0) S. Alt. yrs. Theory and princi- 
ples of plant quantitative genetics. Experimental approaches of relationships between type 
and source of genetic variability, concepts of inbreeding, estimations of genetic variance 
and selection theory. Burton 

CS (GN, HS) 616 Breeding Methods. Preqs.: CS(GN, HS) 5U, ST 512. 2(2-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Theory and principles of plant breeding methodology including population improvement, 
selection procedures, genotypic evaluation, cultivar development and breeding strategies. 

Wynne 

CS (GN, HS) 617 Nonconventional Plant Breeding. Preq.: CS (GN, HS) 5U1. 1(1-0) F. 
Alt. yrs. Theory and principles of molecular and nonconventional plant breeding. Experi- 
mental approaches to induce genetic change, cytoplasmic recombination, haploid utiliza- 
tion and potentials of molecular techniques for solving breeding problems. Sisco 

CS (GN, HS, PP) 618 Breeding for Pest Resistance. Preqs.: CS (GN, HS) 51*1, PP315, 
ST 512. 2(2-0) F. Alt. yrs. Theory and principles of breeding for pest resistance. Experimen- 
tal approaches for examining genetics of host-parasite interactions, expression and stabil- 
ity of pest resistance and breeding strategies for developing pest-resistant cultivars. 

Rufty 

*Students are expected to consult with the instructor before registration. 



122 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CS 690 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. A maximum of two credits is allowed 
toward the master's degree; however, additional credits toward the doctorate are allowed. 
Scientific articles, progress reports in research and special problems of interest to agrono- 
mists are reviewed and discussed. Graduate Staff 

CS 699 Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. A maximum of six credits is 
allowed toward the master's degree, but no restrictions toward the doctorate. 

Graduate Staff 

Curriculum and Instruction 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see education. 

Design 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental informtion, see architec- 
ture, landscape architecture, product design. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

DN 400 Design Studio. Preq.: DF 102 or written approval ofdept. head. 6(0-9) F,S. 

DN411 Advanced Visual Laboratory. Preqs.:DFl02 or both DF 111 and DF 112. 3(0-6) 
F,S. 

DN 412 Advanced Photography. Preq.: DN 312. 8(1-4) S. 

DN 413 Synthetic Drawing. Preq.: DF 102. 3(2-3) F. 

DN 414 Color and Light Laboratory. Preq.: DF 102. 3(3-0) F,S. 

DN 415 Microcomputer Graphics for Designers. 3(3-0) S. 

DN 4 19 Multi-Media in Design. Preq.: DN 212. 3(l-h) S. 

DN 421 Environmental Cognition for Designers. 3(3-0) F. 

DN 423 Concepts of Space. 3(3-0) F. 

DN 445 Aesthetics and Design. Preq.: DN Ul or DN U2. 3(3-0) F. 

DN 454 Geometry for Designers. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(3-0) S. 

DN 491 Special Seminar in Design. 1-3 F,S. 

DN 492 Special Topics in Design. 1-3 F,S. 

DN 494 Internship in Design. Preqs.: Jr. standing, 3.0 GPA or better, approval ofdept. 
head. 3-6 (Max. 6) F,S. 

DN 495 Independent Study in Design. Preqs.: Jr. standing, 3.0 GPA or better, approval 
ofdept. head. 1-3 (Max. 6) F,S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 123 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

DN 541 Seminar on Ideas in Design. Preq.: Grad. standing. 2-3 F,S. An examination of 
aesthetics and the relationships of philosophic thought to design. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

DN 611 Advanced Visual Laboratory. Preq.: Grad. standing; may be taken for a maxi- 
mum of 12 credit hours. 2-U F,S. Advanced experimental studies in visual phenomena 
related to design. 

DN 698 Design Research and Service Learning Projects. Preqs.: Grad. standing, 
consent of program director and graduate committee. 2-6 F,S,Sum. Problems relevant to 
design will provide the subjects for graduate study based upon research, service learning 
projects, on- and off-campus internships and individual investigations will be under the 
direction of faculty advisors. 

Ecology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor A. G. Wollum II, Chairman 

Professors: D. A. Adams, S. P. S. Arya, R. C. Axtell, K. R. Barker, D. M. Benson, 
U. Blum, J. R. Bradley Jr., S. W. Buol, D. S. Chamblee, A. W. Cooper, B. J. 
Copeland, P. D. Doerr, G. H. Elkan, D. J. Frederick, L. F. Grand, H. D. Gross, 

F. E. Guthrie, F. P. Hain, D. Kamykowski, G. G. Kennedy, J. M. Miller, T. 0. 
Perry, K. H. Pollock, E. D. Seneca, D. L. Solomon, R. E. Stinner, H. R. van der 
Vaart, T. G. Wolcott, A. D. Worsham; Professor (USD A): J. C. Burns; Professor 
(USDI): M. T. Huish; Professor Emeritus: D. W. Hayne; Associate Professors: 
K. P. Burnham, L. B. Crowder, J. M. DiPaolo, F. L. Gould, B. C. Haning, R. A. 
Lancia, S. C. Mozley, R. A. Powell, L. A. Real, J. R. Walters, T. R. Wentworth; 
Associate Prof essor (USD A): K. P. Burnham; Assistant Prof essors: C. Brownie, 

G. J. House, L. A. Levin 

Ecology is the science concerned with the interactions of organisms with each 
other and with their environment. It is an integrative science through which one 
gains an understanding of biological and physical interrelationships and pre- 
dicts the consequences of altering one or several components of an ecosystem. 

Students in a number of basic and applied curricula may elect to major in 
ecology at the master's level leading to an M.S. degree or minor in ecology at the 
master's and Ph.D. levels. The minor provides an opportunity for a coherent 
picture of the field of ecology but does not usurp the normal prerogatives of 
graduate advisory committees in structuring graduate programs. 

The ecology minor is an interdepartmental program drawing faculty from the 
botany, crop science, entomology, forestry, marine, earth and atmospheric sci- 
ences, microbiology, plant pathology, soil science, statistics and zoology depart- 
ments. The program is administered by the Ecology Advisory Committee. Addi- 
tional information about the program may be obtained by writing to one of the 
faculty members listed above or to Chairman, Ecology Faculty, P. 0. Box 7619, 
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7619. 



124 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



The following courses are recognized as ecological and have been grouped into 
certain related areas. (For course descriptions, see respective departmental 
listings.) 

General Ecology: BO (ZO) 560 Principles of Ecology; BO 565 Plant Community Ecology; 
BO (ZO) 660 Advanced Topics in Ecology I; ZO (BO) 661 Advanced Topics in Ecology 
II. 

Population Ecology: ZO 517 Population Ecology; ENT 531 Insect Ecology. 

Limnology and Marine Science: ZO 419 Introduction to Limnology; ZO (ENT) 509 
Ecology of Stream Invertebrates; ZO (MEA) 520 Principles of Biological Oceano- 
graphy; ZO 619 Advanced Limnology. 

Behavior: ZO 410 Introduction to Animal Behavior; ZO 501 Ornithology; ZO 691 Topics 
in Animal Behavior. 

Microbial Ecology: MB 501 A,B,C Advanced Microbiology I ( A-Metabolism; B-Physiol- 
ogy; C-Immunology); MB 503 Microbial Ecology; SSC (MB) 532 Soil Microbiology; PP 
611 Advanced Plant Nematology; PP (BO) 625 Advanced Mycology. 

Terrestrial Ecology: BO 544 Plant Geography; ZO 544 Mammalogy; SSC 551 Soil 
Morphology. Genesis and Classification; MEA 555 Meteorology of the Biosphere. 

Physiological Ecology: ZO (PHY) 513 Comparative Physiology; ZO (FW) 515 Growth 
and Reproduction of Fishes; BO 561 Physiological Ecology. 

Mathematical Biology and Ecology: ZO (FW) 553 Principles of Wildlife Science; BO 
570 Quantitative Ecology; BMA (MA. ST) 571, 572 Biomathematics I, II. 

Applied Ecology: CS 411 Environmental Aspects of Crop Production; ZO (FW) 420 
Fishery Science; ZO 441 Ichthyology; FOR 452 Silvics; FOR 472 Renewable Resource 
Policy and Management; SSC 472 Forest Soils; HS (CS) 514 Principles and Methods in 
Weed Science; TOX 515 Environmental Toxicology; ENT 550 Fundamentals of Insect 
Control; ZO (FW) 554 Wildlife Field Studies; ENT 562 insect Pest Management in 
Agricultural Crops; ENT (ZO) 582 Medical and Veterinary Entomology; FOR 613 
Special Topics in Silviculture; FOR 614 Advanced Topics in Administration of Forest 
Resources; BO 662 Applied Coastal Ecology. 

The requirements for a major in Ecology are: 

Master of Science Degree: Six courses including BO (ZO) 560 (or its equivalent), either 
BO 565, BO (ZO) 660 or ZO(BO) 661, ST 511, ECO 690 and one course from each of two 
designated areas (population ecology, limnology and marine science, etc.). The latter two 
courses should not be in the same department as the major professor. 



The requirements for a minor in Ecology are: 



Master of Science Degree: Three ecological courses, including BO (ZO) 560 (or its equi- 
valent) and either BO 565, BO (ZO) 660 or ZO (BO) 661. The third course should not be in 
the same department as the major. 

Ph.D. Degree: Four ecological courses, including BO (ZO) 560 (or its equivalent) and at 
least one other course from the general ecology area. One course outside the general 
ecology area is required. If more than one course is taken from outside the general ecology 
area, these courses must come from different designated areas (i.e., population ecology, 
limnology and marine science, etc.). Courses outside the general ecology area should not 
be from the same department as the major. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 125 

Incoming students may apply equivalent courses toward these requirements at 
the discretion of their graduate committees. Students minoring in ecology, par- 
ticularly at the Ph.D. level, are encouraged to take courses in mathematics and 
sttistics, at least ST 511 and ST 512. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ECO 690 Ecology Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F. Scientific articles, progress 
reports and special problems of interest to ecologists are reviewed and discussed. Minimum 
of one seminar presentation required for credit. 

ECO 693 Special Problems in Ecology. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-6 F,S,Sum. Investiga- 
tion of special problems in ecology of particular interest to advanced students under the 
direction of a faculty member. Directed research in some specialized phase of ecology other 
than a thesis problem, but designed to provide experience and training in research. 

Economics and Business 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. M. Hoover, Head 

Professor C. R. Knoeber, Graduate Administrator 

Associate Professor S. E. Margolis, Program Director of Management 

Graduate Advisor and Program Assistant B. L. Puryear 

aduate Administrator 

Professors: S. G. Allen, G. A. Carlson, R. L. Clark, A. J. Coutu, R. D. Dahle, L. E. 
Danielson, J. E. Easley Jr., E. W. Erickson, R. M. Fearn, D. Fisher, A. R. 
Gallant. T. J. Grennes, D. L. Holley Jr., D. M. Holthausen Jr., D. N. Hyman, L. 
A. Ihnen, P. R. Johnson, T. Johnson, C. P. Jones, R. A. King, C. J. Messere, C. L. 
Moore Sr., E. C. Pasour Jr., R. J. Peeler, R. K. Perrin, R. A. Schrimper, J. J. 
Seater, V. K. Smith, D. A. Sumner, R. E. Sylla, C. B. Turner, M. L. Walden; 
Extension Professors: H. L. Liner, R. C. Wells; Professors Emeriti: R. C. Brooks, 
T. E. Nichols Jr., B. M. Olsen, C. R. Pugh, J. A. Seagraves, R. L. Simmons, J. G. 
Sutherland, W. D. Toussaint, J. C. Williamson Jr.; Associate Professors: D. S. 
Ball, D. L. Baumer, G. A. Benson, J. C. Dutton Jr., E. A. Estes, D. J. Flath, K. B. 
Frazier, J. D. Hess, J. S. Lapp, S. J. Liebowitz, M. B. McElroy, R. B. Palmquist, 
D. K. Pearce, J. C. Poindexter Jr., J. W. Rockness, R. J. Rossana, C. D. Safley, 
W. J. Wessels, P. F. Williams, J. W. Wilson, M. K. Wohlgenant, G. J. Zucker- 
man; Associate Professors Emeriti: H. C. Gilliam Jr., C. W. Harrell Jr.; Assist- 
ant Professors: B. Babcock, R. N. Collender, E. F. Cox, P. L. Fackler. L. B. 
Ferreri, E. Gerstner, A. R. Hall, S. A. Hatchell, A. E. Headen, D. L. Hoag, P. H. 
Kupiec, E. A. McDermed, A. J. McKee Jr., K. Mitchell, C. M. Newmark, R. R. 
Rucker, W. N. Thurman, K. D. Zering 



126 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The Department of Economics and Business offers programs of study leading 
to the Master of Economics, the Master of Arts in economics, the Master of 
Science in agricultural economics, the Master of Science in management (in 
conjunction with other departments) and the Ph.D. degree in economics. Empha- 
sis is placed on economic theory and quantitative economic analysis and their 
application to economic problems. Special seminars and workshops are available 
to students as a means of pursuing topics of special interest. 

The Master of Economics and the Master of Arts in economics require a 
minimum of 30 hours of course work. Flexible course requirements permit a 
student, in consultation with a graduate advisory committee, to develop a pro- 
gram to meet individual academic and career objectives. Price Theory (EB 501), 
Income and Employment Theory (EB 502) and a nine-hour minor in a discipline 
outside the department are required. The most popular minor discipline is 
statistics, but many departments offer minor programs, including Industrial 
Engineering, Operations Research. Mathematics, and Political Science and Pub- 
lic Administration. The remaining course work (fifteen hours) is selected from 
the varied departmental offerings below. The Master of Arts in economics differs 
from the Master of Economics only in that the former substitutes six hours of 
thesis research for six hours in the major. 

The Master of Science in agricultural economics also requires a minimum of 30 
hours of course work. EB 501, EB 502, one course from the agricultural econom- 
ics offerings and a nine-hour minor from outside the department are required. 
The statistics minor is often chosen since six hours of statistics are required for 
this degree. A thesis is required and six hours of research study toward the thesis 
can be included in the program. The remaining course work is selected from such 
areas as agricultural production economics, agricultural policy, agricultural 
markets, managerial finance, natural resources and so forth, according to the 
student's interests. 

Prerequisites for any of these programs include one semester each of interme- 
diate microeconomics and macroeconomics and a minimum of one semester of 
calculus. A full year of calculus is advised. Domestic students may complete these 
prerequisite courses by registering through the Division of Lifelong Education in 
a special part-time preparatory program, Post-baccalaureate Studies (PBS). 
GRE scores are not required of applicants but are recommended. 

The Master of Science in management (MSM) degree emphasizes the applica- 
tion of quantitative techniques and economic analyhsis to management decision 
making. This unique program is the result of the combined efforts of seven 
departments and provides students an opportunity to concentrate in a field of 
study offered by any of these departments. This concentration is known as the 
student's technical option and can be completed in: Civil Engineering, Computer 
Studies, Economics and Business, Industrial Engineering, Operations Research, 
Statistics, and Textile Management and Technology. See the complete descrip- 
tion of this program, including the core management and economics course work 
in this bulletin, listed under Management. 

The Ph.D. program has no specific hour requirements; however, at least six 
semesters of work beyond the bachelor's degree are required, of which at least 
two consecutive semesters must be in residence. Candidates take course work and 
written examinations in economic theory and a minor of their choice. In addition, 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 127 

each student chooses a field of study within the department {e.g., agricultural 
economics, econometrics, applied macroeconomics, international trade, resource 
and environmental economics, labor economics and human resources, or man- 
agerial economics). A minimum of two semesters of differential and integral 
calculus and a master's degree are prerequisites for the Ph.D. program. Students 
possessing only a bachelor's degree may enter one of the department's master's 
programs and complete courses which may be applied toward the Ph.D. There is 
no foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. GRE scores are not required of 
applicants but are recommended. 

The department maintains microcomputer, mainframe computer access and 
library facilities available to students for course work and research uses. The 
Microcomputer Instructional Laboratory consists of twenty IBM personal com- 
puters linked to printers and memory devices in a local area network. In addition, 
the Programming Applications Laboratory provides technically trained pro- 
gramming personnel to assist in the preparation of work for mainframe comput- 
ing. Computer terminals providing access to the mainframe are available in the 
department and throughout the campus. A well-equipped departmental library, 
the D. H.Hill Library and library facilities of two nearby major universities are 
readily available for graduate student use. Graduate students on financial sup- 
port are provided study carrels or office space. 

The services of the University's Career Planning and Placement Center are 
available to all students. In addition, the department employs a placement coun- 
selor to serve its current students and recent graduates. 

For additional information, contact Bobby L. Puryear, Graduate Advisor, 
Department of Economics and Business, Box 8109, North Carolina State Univer- 
sity, Raleigh, NC 27695-8109, phone (919) 737-7157. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ACC 480 Accelerated Survey of Financial and Management Accounting. Credit 
may not be received for both ACC U80 and ACC 220, 280 or 1+69. Intended for graduate 
students and advanced undergraduates not in Economics and Business. 3(3-0) F. 

EB 401 Economic Analysis for Nonmajors. Preg.: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 404 Money, Financial Markets, and the Economy. Preq.: EB 302. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 410 Public Finance. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F. 

EB 413 Competition, Monopoly and Public Policy. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) S. 

EB 415 Farm Appraisal and Finance. Preq.: EB 303 or 310. 3(2-2) F. 

EB 420 Corporation Finance. Preqs.: EB 201 or 212 and ACC 260 or 265. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 422 Investments and Portfolio Management. Preqs.: EB350or ST 311 andEBU20. 
3(3-0) F.S. 

EB 430 Agricultural Price Analysis. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F. 

EB 431 Labor Economics. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F.S. 

EB 435 Urban Economics. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 



128 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

EB 436 Environmental Economics. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) S. 

EB 442 Evolution of Econonrc Ideas. Preq.: EB 202 or 212. 3(3-0) F. 

EB 448 International Economics. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F.S. 

EB 451 Introduction to Econometrics. Preqs.: EB 301. 302. 350. 3(3-0) F. 

EB (HI) 470 The Japanese Economy. Preqs.: EB 301; 3 hours HI. 3(3-0) S. 

EB 475 Comparative Economic Systems. Preq.: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F.S. 

EB (TX) 482 Textile Marketing Management. Preqs.: EB 301, EB 313. TX 380. 3(2-2) 
FS. 

EB (WPS) 485 Management Development Seminar. Preq.: EB 201 of 212. This course 
may not be used for credit toward an economics minor for any graduate degree. 3(3-0) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ACC 520 Advanced Management Accounting. Preqs.: ACC U80, EB (ST) 350 and EB 
501. 3(3-0) S. Uses of accounting data for management decisions within the firm; applica- 
tions of formal analytical models including decision theory, statistical analysis of cost 
behavior and optimization models; management and control of decentralized operations; 
and design and evaluation of accounting systems. Graduate Staff 

EB 501 Price Theory. Preqs.: MA 113 and EB 301. 3(3-0) F,S. An intensive analysis of 
the determination of prices and of market behavior, including demand, cost and produc- 
tion, pricing under competitive conditions and pricing under monopoly and other imper- 
fectly competitive conditions. Graduate Staff 

EB 502 Income and Employment Theory. Preqs.: EB 301, EB 302, EB (ST) 350, MA 

1 1 3. 3(3-0) F.S. Determinants of national income, employment, wages, the interest rate and 
inflation. Emphasis on the real (as opposed to monetary) determinants of these variables 
and on the microfoundations of modern macroeconomics. Discussion of monetary and fiscal 
policy and stochastic elements in income determination. Graduate Staff 

EB (RRA) 503 Economics of Recreation. 3(3-0) F. (See recreation resources adminis- 
tration.) 

EB 504 Monetary and Financial Macroeconomics.Preg.. EB 502. 3(3-0) S. Financial 
and monetary determinants of national income and employment and the levels of wages, the 
interest rate and inflation. Emphasis on the money supply and the banking system. Special 
topics include banking regulation, budgetary deficits and the dynamics of money stock 
determination. D. Fisher, Pearce, Poindexter 

EB 512 Law and Economics. Preq.: EB 301 or EB 1*01. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. An economic 
analysis of the sources and effects of law, including common law, statutory law and 
regulation. Topics discussed include property rights and contracts, liability rules, crime 
and punishment, statutory enactment, bureaucratic behavior and institutional reform. 

Baumer. Knoeber 

EB 513 Research Methods in Marketing. Preqs.: EB 313. EB 350, EB 501. 3(3-0) S. A 
systematic approach to the structure, implementation and analysis of marketing research 
for decision making. Models of consumer demand and firm behavior analyzed in a market- 
ing context. Gerstner, Liebowitz 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 129 



EB 515 Environmental and Resource Policy. Preq.: EB 301 or EB U01. 3(3-0) F. Alt. 
yrs. Application of price theory and benefit-cost analysis to public decisions related to 
resources and the environment. Emphasis on evaluation of water supply and recreation 
investments, water quality management alternatives, public-sector pricing, common 
property resources and optimum management of forest and energy resources. 

Palmquist, Rucker 

EB 520 Managerial Finance: Theory and Applications. Preqs.: EB U20 and EB 301 or 

U01. 3(3-0) S. The foundations of finance theory and the empirical evidence available 
regarding the theory. Applications of basic finance theory, including capital budgeting, 
markets, valuation, cost of capital, financing alternatives, dividend policy and manage- 
ment of liquid assets. The micro-finance decisions made by a firm, primarily the invest- 
ment, financing and dividend decisions. Jones, Kupiec, Mitchell 

EB521 Markets and Trade. Preq.: EB 301 or U01. 3(3-0) F. This course emphasizes the 
space, form and time dimensions of market price and the location and produce combination 
decisions of firms. Consideration is given to the way in which non-price factors and public 
policy choices influence firm behavior and the efficiency of marketing systems. Application 
of these models to agricultural, industrial and public service questions is emphasized, 
including the relationships between resource availability and the spatial arrangement of 
economic activity. Dahle, King 

EB 522 Portfolio and Capital Market Theory. Preqs.: EB 501 and EB 350 or ST 311. 
3(3-0) F. Portfolio theory and its applications, plus capital market theory and the equili- 
brium pricing of financial assets. The role of securities, utility theory and analysis of 
secondary markets and their efficiency and the definition and measurement of returns and 
risks. Valuing securities, including options contracts. Jones, Kupiec, Mitchell 

EB 523 Planning Farm and Area Adjustments. Preqs.: EB 301, 303 or U01. 3(2-2) S. 
The application of economic principles to production problems on typical farms in the state; 
methods and techniques of economic analysis of the farm business; application of research 
findings to production decisions; development of area agricultural programs. 

Graduate Staff 

EB 524 Financial Markets. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The economic characteris- 
tics of financial markets and instruments: determination of interest rates; structure of 
domestic financial markets; flow of funds; nature of financial institutions; nature of finan- 
cial instruments; and financial market behavior. Jones, .Kupiec, Mitchell 

EB 525 Managerial Economics. Preq.: EB 301 or U01. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Applications of 
economic theory to the study of selected business practices in realms of finance, marketing, 
and management decision making. Specific topics have included: capital budgeting, finan- 
cial structure, government regulation of industry, pricing strategies, tie-in sales, contrac- 
tual arrangements between manufacturers and retailers, comparisons of managerial 
behavior in nonprofit or government enterprise to that in for-profit firms. 

Holthausen, Margolis 

EB 526 Human Resource Management. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F. Application of 
decision-making techniques and economic models to problems of human resource man- 
agement. Problems, causes and solutions analyzed in relationship to maximizing profits. 
Nature and impact of government regulations on human resource management. 

Allen, Clark, Wessels 

EB 532 Economics of Trade Unions. Preq.: EB 301 or U01. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. An 
examination of the growth of the trade union movement in the United States. Primary 
consideration is given to the impact of unions on the economy through their influence on 
wages, prices, employment and resource allocation. Other topics include the relationship 
between the government and unions, the changing compensation mix and the recent 
growth in public employee unionism. Allen, Clark 



130 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

EB 533 Economics of World Food and Agricultural Policy. Preq.: EB 301 or 401. 
S(S-O) S. Economic analysis of the causes and effects of agricultural policies commonly 
applied in developed, developing and planned economies. Emphasis on economic models of 
policy analysis. Examination of the impact of commodity, farm imput, international trade, 
consumer and general economic policies on agriculture and the whole economy. Effects of 
policy on income distribution and economic development. Hoover, P. Johnson, Sumner 

EB 540 Economic Development. Preq.: EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. An examination 
of the problems encountered in promoting regional and national economic development. 
Consideration is given to the structural changes required for raising standards of living. 
Some basic principles of economics are applied to suggest ways of achieving development 
goals. Topics include planning strategies, policies and external assistance. Sumner 

EB 551 Agricultural Production Economics. Preqs.: MA 1 13 and EB 301 or EB 401. 
8(8-0) S. An economic analysis of agricultural production including: production functions, 
cost functions, programming and decision-making principles. Applications of these princi- 
ples to farm and regional resources allocation, and to the distribution of income to and 
within agriculture. Carlson, Perrin 

EB (ST) 561 Intermediate Econometrics. Preqs.: EB 501 and ST 513. 3(3-0) S. The 
formalization of economic hypotheses into testable relationships and the application of 
appropriate statistical techniques will be emphasized. Major attention will be given to 
procedures applicable for single equation stochastic models expressing microeconomic and 
macroeconomic relationships. Statistical considerations that are relevant in working with 
time series and cross sectional data in economic investigations will be covered. Survey of 
simultaneous equation models and the available estimation techniques. 

McDermed, Thurman 

EB 570 Analysis of American Economic History. Preq.: EB (HI) 371 orgrad. standing 
or PBS status. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Stresses the application of economic analysis to the 
formulation and testing of hypotheses concerning economic growth and development in the 
historical context. Problems selected for analysis will be drawn primarily from American 
economic history. Sylla 

EB (SOC) 574 The Economics of Population. Preq.: EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) S. A review of 
population theories from the pre-Malthusian to the contemporary. An introduction to 
demographic data sources and analysis. Microeconomic models of fertility are intensively 
treated, and macroeconomic demographic models also are examined. The public policy 
implications of these models are developed. Discussions include underpopulation, overpopu- 
lation, optimum growth rate and incentive schemes. Graduate Staff 

EB (TX) 585 Market Research in Textiles. 3(3-0) S. (See textile materials and 
management.) 

EB 590 Special Economics Topics. Preq.: CI. Maximum 6. F.S.Sum. An examination of 
current vary as problems on a lecture-discussion basis. Course content will changing 
conditions require new approaches to deal with emerging problems. Graduate Staff 

EB 598 Topical Problems in Economics. Preq.: CI. 1-6. F.S.Sum. An investigation of 
topics of particular i nterest to advanced students under faculty direction on a tutorial basis. 
Credits and content vary with student needs. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

EB 600 Advanced Price Theory. Preqs.: EB 501, MA 212. 3(3-0) F. Theory of consumer 
behavior. Derivation of individual and market demand curves. Consumer surplus. Deriva- 
tion of firm and market supply curves. Equilibrium and price determination in a market 
economy. Consideration of alternative market structures. Hess, Holthausen 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 131 

EB 601 Prices, Value and Welfare. Preq.: EB 600. 3(3-0) S. Production and duality 
theory. The demand for and supply of factors of production. Theories of capital and interest. 
Welfare economics topics, including externalities, compensation, public goods and the 
social welfare function. General equilibrium. Dutton, Thurman 

EB 602 Advanced Income and Employment Theory. Preq.: EB 502. 3(3-0) F. An 
analysis of the forces determining the level of income and employment; a review of some of 
the theories of economic fluctuations; and a critical examination of a selected macroeco- 
nomic system. Rossana, Seater 

EB 603 History of Economic Thought. Preqs.: EB 501 and 502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
Sum. Alt. yrs. A systematic analysis of the development and cumulation of economic 
thought, designed in part to provide a sharper focus and more adequate perspective for the 
understanding of contemporary economics. D. Fisher, McElroy 

EB 604 Monetary Economics. Preq.: EB 602. 3(3-0) S. Consideration of the money 
market and portfolio management, the cost of capital, effects of monetary phenomena on 
investment and accumulation of wealth with emphasis throughout on problems arising 
from uncertainty; general equilibrium theory of money, interest, prices and output. 

D. Fisher, Lapp, Pearce 

EB 606 Industrial Organization and Control. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) F. Microeconomic 
theory is applied to the empirical analysis of public policies that affect the efficiency of 
resource allocation in the U. S. economy. Special attention is given to the interrelationships 
between industrial structure, conduct and performance. Flath, Margolis 

EB 610 Theory of Public Finance. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) S. An application of microeco- 
nomic theory and welfare economics to the public sector. Topics include externalities and 
public policy, the theory of public goods, collective choice, program budgeting and cost- 
benefit analysis, the theory of taxation and its application to tax policy, public debt, and 
fiscal federalism. Hyman 

EB 615 Environmental and Resource Economics. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The 
theoretical tools and empirical techniques necessary for an understanding of resource and 
environmental economics, developed in both a static and dynamic framework. Discussions 
of the causes of environmental problems, possible policies and approaches to nonmarket 
valuation. Analysis of resource use over time using control theory for both renewable and 
exhaustible resources. Palmquist, Rucker, Smith 

EB 625 Long Range Planning in Business and Industry. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) F. 
Theory and practice of long range planning in business and industry. Case discussions and 
intensive readings dealing with techniques for identifying opportunities and risks in the 
environment of the firm, determining corporate strengths and weaknesses, specifying long 
range strategy. Special attention is given to the roles of management and the internal 
processes of large organizations as the organizations respond to changes in external 
conditions. Holthausen, Newmark 

EB 630 Labor Economics. Preqs.: EB 501 and one of the following: EB (ST) 561, ST '422, 
ST 5 12, ST 51 7. 3(3-0) S. Application of microeconomic theory and econometric methods to 
labor market behavior in both static and dynamic contexts. Topics include labor demand 
analysis, labor force participation, hours of work, household production, human capital, 
distribution of earnings, information and search, and mobility. Allen, Wessels 

EB631 Policy and Research Issues in Labor Economics. Preqs.: EB 501 and one of the 

following: EB (ST) 561, ST 422, ST 512, ST 517. 3(3-0) F. Survey of current literature on 
policy-related issues in labor economics, including trade union behavior, unemployment, 
macroeconomic aspects of labor market adjustment, discrimination, regulation of wages 
and benefits and public-sector labor markets. Examples from labor markets in the U. S. 
and developing countries. Recent research developments in labor economics, topics to vary 
according to the interests and needs of students. Clark, Fearn 



132 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

EB 640 Advanced Economic Development. Preqs.: EB 501, 502, 5U0. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
An analysis of the factors determining the growth of poorer countries and regions of 
countries. Consideration is given to issues that have arisen in current theoretical and 
empirical bases for policy decisions. Included in the latter elements are the quantitative 
foundations for planned and programmed development. Applications of alternative plan- 
ning methods are evaluated. King 

EB 641 Agricultural Production and Supply. Preqs.: EB 501 and ST 513. 3(3-0) F. An 
advanced study in the logic of, and empirical inquiry into, producer behavior and choice 
among combinations of factors and kinds and qualities of output; aggregative consequences 
of individuals' and firms' decisions in terms of product supply and factor demand; factor 
markets and income distribution; and general interdependency among economic variables. 

Carlson, Perrin, Sumner 

EB 642 Consumption, Demand and Market Interdependency. Preqs.: EB 501 and ST 
513. 3(3-0) S. An analysis of the behavior of individual households and of consumers in the 
aggregate with respect to consumption of agricultural products; the impact of these deci- 
sions on demand for agricultural resources, the competition among agricultural regions 
and for markets; and the interdependence between agriculture and other sectors of the 
economy. Wohlgenant 

EB 648 Theory of International Trade. Preqs.: EB 501, 502. 3(3-0) S. A consideration of 
the specialized body of economic theory dealing w ith the international movement of goods, 
services, capital and payments. Also, a theoretically oriented consideration of policy. 

Dutton, P. Johnson 

EB649 Monetary Aspects of International Trade. Preq.: EB 502. 3(3-0) F. Study of the 
macroeconomic problems of an open economy including the balance of payments adjust- 
ment mechanism, alternative exchange rate systems, external effects of monetary and 
fiscal policy, optimum currency areas and international monetary reform. Grennes 

EB 650 Economic Decision Theory. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) S. Study of general theories of 
choice. Structure of decision problems, the role of information; formulation of objectives. 
Current research problems. Hess, Holthausen 

EB(ST)651 Econometrics. Preqs.: EB 600, ST 1>21, ST 502. 3(3-0) F. The role and uses of 
statistical inference in economic research; the problem of spanning the gap from an 
economic model to its statistical counterpart; measurement problems and their solutions 
arising from the statistical model and the nature of the data; limitations and interpretation 
of results of economic measurement from statistical techniques. T. Johnson, Smith 

EB (ST) 652 Topics in Econometrics. Preq.: EB (ST) 651. 3(3-0) S. Survey of current 
literature on estimation and inference in simultaneous stochastic equations systems. Tech- 
niques for combining cross section and time series data including covariance, error corre- 
lated and error component models. Lag models and inference in dynamic systems. Produc- 
tion functions, productivity measurement and hypotheses about economic growth. Com- 
plete and incomplete prior information in regression analysis. Nonlinear estimation in 
economic models. Gallant, Schrimper 

EB 682 Advanced Macroeconomics. Preq.: EB 602. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Advanced study 
of macroeconomics. Emphasis is on business cycles and behavior of real variables. Topics 
include: real, incomplete information and disequilibrium theories of the business cycle; 
rational expectations; contract theory and indexation; investment; and the effects of 
government expenditure, taxes and debt. Rossana, Seater 

EB 684 Monetary Theory. Preqs.: EB 600, 601, 602, 60k- 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Advanced 
study of microand macro-economic theories of the role of money in the economy. Primary 
emphasis on money demand and monetary growth models. Specific areas explored include: 
traditional and recent developments in both asset and transactions theory and rational 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 133 

expectations and optimal policy. Discussion of the empirical record included for most 
topics. D. Fisher, Pearce 

EB 699 Research in Economics. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. Individual 
research in economics under staff supervision and direction. 

Graduate Staff 

Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. J. Dolce, Dean 

Professor J. B. Kirkland, Dean Emeritus 

The following master's degree programs are offered by the College of Educa- 
tion and Psychology: 

Adult and Community College Education 

Agricultural Education 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Educational Administration and Supervision 

Guidance and Personnel Services 

Industrial Arts Education 

Mathematics Education 

Middle Grades Education 

Occupational Education 

Psychology 

Science Education 

Special Education 

Vocational Industrial Education 

Students accepted into any of the above education programs may seek either 
the Master of Science degree or the Master of Education degree; students admit- 
ted to the Department of Psychology seek the Master of Science degree. The 
Master of Science degree is research-oriented and is preparation for further 
graduate study. The Master of Education is a professional degree which allows 
for wider latitude in the choice of course work than is allowed by the Master of 
Science program. 

The College of Education and Psychology also offers certification programs at 
the intermediate (sixth-year) level in the following fields: 

Agricultural Education 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Educational Administration and Supervision 

School Counseling 

Mathematics Education 

Occupational Education 

School Psychology 

Science Education 

Special Education 

Vocational Industrial Education 



134 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The following doctoral programs are offered by the College of Education and 
Psychology: 

Adult and Community College Education Ed.D. 

Curriculum and Instruction Ed.D. 

Educational Administration and Supervision Ed.D. 

Guidance and Personnel Services Ed.D. 

Industrial Arts Education Ed.D. 

Mathematics Education Ph.D. 

Occupational Education* Ed.D. 

Psychology Ph.D. 

Science Education Ph.D. 

All doctoral programs require a minimum of one year of full-time resident 
study. 

Graduate programs are planned by the student and his or her committee in 
terms of the student's educational and career objectives, experience and previous 
preparation. 

Prior to consideration of an application for admission, the following must have 
been received: completed application form, an official copy of current (not more 
than three years old) Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores, official tran- 
scripts of all undergraduate and graduate courses taken and at least three 
completed recommendation forms. In most programs an interview is required. 
Psychology also requires the GRE Advanced Test and the Miller Analogies Test. 
Individual programs may have additional requirements for admission. In order 
to maintain personalized, quality graduate programs, each program can enroll 
only a limited number of students regardless of the qualifications of the 
applicants. 

The College of Education and Psychology is housed in Poe Hall, a modern 
building with up-to-date research and instructional facilities, including: 

Curriculum Materials Center — The Curriculum Materials Center, adminis- 
tered by the College of Education and Psychology, is located in Poe Hall. The 
center maintains a collection of educational materials with particular emphasis 
on teaching methods, research, administration and psychology and includes 
films, filmstrips, slides, audiotapes, video cassettes and simulation games. A 
special collection of materials about third world countries is also maintained. 
Audiovisual equipment is available for previewing materials in the center. 
Microcomputers for teaching and research are a part of this facility. The center 
acquires textbooks adopted by the State Board of Education for secondary level 
subjects as well as other selected textbooks and reference materials. The mission 
of the center is to support programs in the College of Education and Psychology, 
and the center's use by campus personnel outside of the College is limited. 

Instructional Materials Production Center— Education, instruction and com- 
munication require the clear and effective presentation of content. The Instruc- 
tional Materials Production Center (IMPC) aids this requirement through the 
design and production of instructional and informational materials in a range of 
formats. Although resources and personnel of the IMPC predominantly serve 

'Students in agricultural education or industrial and technical education would seek the Ed.D. in occupational education. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 135 

faculty, students and projects of the College of Education and Psychology, 
increasing requests for materials from the University and beyond are met as 
possible on a contract basis. 

The IMPC is directed by two instructional designers, faculty members of the 
College which is unique in having a production facility in which two persons of 
such training function full time as designers, producers and consultants. Other 
personnel in the facility serve as teaching assistants, graphic designers or are 
hired for the special needs of certain projects. Personnel work through the 
process of instructional design with those persons having a communicational 
need — faculty members, content specialists or project directors. Careful applica- 
tion of this process is necessary in order to determine what materials and strate- 
gies best serve the interrelated considerations of goals, objectives, content, users, 
audience, cost and available resources and is also necessary if final products are 
to be as lucid in design as in educational soundness. Formats in which materials 
are developed include: print, overhead transparencies, graphic imagery, dis- 
plays and exhibits, signage, photography, slides, slide-tape presentations and in 
some cases videotape. 

Office of Publications — This office prints and publishes instructional materials 
developed by faculty and students, as well as by public school teachers associated 
with various College programs. 

The Computing Facility is a laboratory and two adjacent classrooms equipped 
with microcomputers and with terminals and televideos linked to University 
computing facilities and the Triangle Universities Computing Center (TUCC). 
The facility is used for faculty research and development, student projects, 
graphics instruction, in-service teacher training workshops and training. 

Other Special Facilities — Poe Hall also houses an extensive variety of shops 
(metal, wood, ceramic, electrical and photography); counseling and testing cen- 
ters; several laboratories for the study of human behavior; an animal room; and a 
standardized test library. 

Adult and Community College Education 

Adult and community college education is a component of both the College of 
Education and Psychology and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. For 
a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see adult and com- 
munity college education. 

Agricultural Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor L. R. Jewell, Coordinator 

Professor: J. K. Coster; Professor Emeritus: C. C. Scarborough; Associate Profes- 
sors Emeriti: C. D. Bryant, T. R. Miller; Assistant Professors: J. L. Flowers, B. 
J. Malpiedi 



136 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The agricultural education program offers study leading to the Master of 
Science and the Master of Education degrees and to the intermediate (sixth-year) 
certificate. Both master's programs require a minimum of 36 semester hours 
which reflect the student's background and career expectations and which meet 
the approval of the student's advisory committee. Graduate programs are 
designed to meet the needs of individual students for further study and research 
as well as to prepare them for educational leadership roles in teaching, adminis- 
tration, supervision and research in agricultural education. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 554 Planning Programs in Agricultural Education. S(S-O) F,S. 

ED 565 Agricultural Occupations. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 566 Occupational Experience in Agriculture. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 568 Adult Education in Agriculture. 3(3-0) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 664 Supervision in Agricultural Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

Counselor Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. C. Locke, Head 

Professors: L. K. Jones, N. A. Sprinthall; Professors Emeriti: W. E. Hopke, C. G. 
Morehead; Associate Professors: H. A. Exum, E. R. Gerler Jr.; Visiting Asso- 
ciate Professor: T. H. Stafford Jr.; Associate Prof essor Emeriti: J . G. McVay, B. 
C. Talley Jr.; Assistant Professor: D. D. Saidla; Visiting Assistant Professor: C. 
L. Oglesby; Adjunct Assistant Professor: R. F. Anderson 

The department offers work leading to the Master of Science, Master of Educa- 
tion and Doctor of Education degrees as well as to the sixth-year certificate, with 
a major in the field of guidance and personnel services. Each of these degrees is 
designed to prepare individuals for guidance and personnel positions at various 
levels in elementary and secondary schools, junior and community colleges, trade 
and technical schools and institutes, institutions of higher education and com- 
munity agencies. The student may specialize in one of several areas depending 
upon individual career goals. 

It is desirable for an applicant to have had undergraduate or graduate course 
work in humanities, social and behavioral sciences as well as work experience in 
a human development context. Students accepted into the department are those 
who anticipate devoting full- or part-time to guidance and personnel work. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 137 

Admission requirements for the department are a minimum of a B average in 
the junior and senior years of undergraduate work; satisfactory scores on the 
aptitude section of the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogies 
Test; three satisfactory letters of recommendation in regard to previous educa- 
tion and employment experiences, personal characteristics and emotional 
maturity. An interview and work sample are also required for doctoral 
admission. 

For descriptions of the guidance and personnel courses listed below, see educa- 
tion courses. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 520 Introduction to Guidance and Counseling. 3(3-0) F,Sum. 

ED 521 Internship in Guidance and Personnel Services. Credits Arranged. F,S. 

ED 524 Career Counseling and Development. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 

ED 530 Theories and Techniques of Counseling. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 533 Group Counseling. 3(3-0) F,Sum. 

ED 534 Guidance in Elementary and Middle Schools. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 535 Student Personnel Work in Higher Education. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 553 Community Service Agencies. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 590 Special Problems in Guidance. Maximum 6 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 625 Cross Cultural Counseling. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 631 Vocational Development Theory. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 

ED 633 Development and Coordination of School Guidance Programs. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 636 Observation and Supervised Field Work. 1-3 F,S. 

ED 637 Seminar in Cognitive-Developmental Theory and Practice. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 

ED 638 Seminar in Cognitive-Developmental Research. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 640 Laboratory Experiences in Counseling. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 641 A Practicum in Counseling. 2-6 S. 

ED 666 Supervision of Counseling. 3(1-8) F,S. 

ED 686 Professional Issues in Counseling. 1-3 F,S, Alt. yrs. 



138 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Curriculum and Instruction 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor P. H. Martorella, Head 

Professor: B. M. Parramore; Associate Professors: J. F. Arnold, C. L. Crossland, 
D. A. Cullinan, B.J. Fox, C. W. Harper Jr., R.J. Pritchard; Professor Emeritus: 

C. C. Scarborough; Visiting Associate Prof essor: L. Thies-Sprinthall; Associate 
Professor Emeritus: P. J. Rust; Assistant Professors: H. S. Abernathy, H. C. 
Griffin, C. A. Pope, E. S. Vasu; Adjunct Assistant Professors: L. C. Aubrecht, D. 

D. Copeland, M. D. Durfee, N. D. LeVere, M. D. Siedow; Assistant Professor 
Emeritus: K. A. McCutchen 

The department offers work leading to the Master of Education, Master of 
Science and Doctor of Education degrees. A sixth-year program leading to 
certification is also available. Those completing the master's program may qual- 
ify for a graduate teaching certificate in an area of specialization or for a 
supervisor's certificate. 
Students may specialize in one of several areas: 

Curriculum development and supervision 

English and language arts education 

Elementary education — intermediate grades 

Instructional technology— computers 

Middle years education 

Reading education 

Social studies education 

Special education 

Supervision 
Graduate programs are designed for those who plan to qualify as supervisors, 
instructional specialists, curriculum developers, teacher educators and consul- 
tants at preschool through university levels. Graduates may enter positions in 
public schools, service agencies, higher education institutions and industries. 

In addition to meeting the requirements of the Graduate School, applicants 
must provide evidence of satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion and/or Miller Analogies Test; submit a written statement of professional 
goals; and arrange for a departmental interview upon request. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSE 

ED 483 An Introduction to Instructional Media. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. standing. 
3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 501 Computer Applications in Instruction. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 502 The School Curriculum. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 504 Social Studies in the Elementary School. 3(3-0) F. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 139 

ED 506 Education of Exceptional Children. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 507 Foundations of Middle Years Education. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 508 Education of Severely Handicapped. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 509 Methods and Materials Teaching Retarded Children. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 513 Introduction to Issues and Techniques in Visual Impairments. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 519 Early Childhood Education. 3(1-4) S. 

ED 523 Orientation and Mobility of the Visually Impaired. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 531 Mental Retardation. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 536 Structure and Function of the Eye and Use of Low Vision. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 540 Career/Vocational Education for the Handicapped. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 542 Contemporary Approaches in the Teaching of Social Studies. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 544 The Teaching of Composition. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 545 Reading in the Elementary School. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 

ED 546 Reading in the Content Areas. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 

ED 547 Language Arts in the Elementary School. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 548 Development of Microcomputer Software for Instruction. 3(3-1) F. 

ED 551 Principles and Practices of Supervision. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 556 Learning Disabilities. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 557 Methods and Materials in Learning Disabilities. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 558 Resource Teaching in Special Education. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 560 Teaching Through the Arts. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 561 Educational Diagnosis and Prescription for Exceptional Children. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 562 Communication Disorders in the Classroom. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 563 Effective Teaching. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 564 Classroom Management in Special Education. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 571 Introduction to the Gifted Individual. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 572 Methods for Teaching the Gifted. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 573 Behavior Disorders. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 574 Methods and Materials Behavior Disorders. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 576 Teaching/Learning Approaches for Emerging Adolescents. 3(3-0) S. 



140 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 582 Teaching Braille and Communication Skills. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 583 Design and Evaluation of Instructional Materials. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 586 Methods and Materials in Visual Impairments. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 591 Teaching Literature for Young Adults. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 598 Special Problems in Curriculum and Instruction. 1-6 F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 602 Curriculum Theory and Development. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 606 Remediation of Reading Disabilities. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 634 Diagnosis of Reading Disabilities. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 

ED 64 IB Diagnostic-Prescriptive Practicum in Reading. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 641C Practicum in Special Education. 1-6 F,S. 

ED 641G Practicum in Middle Years Education. 3-6 F,S. 

ED 641K Practicum in Supervision. 3-6 F,S. 

ED 641M Practicum in Instructional Technology— Computers. 3-6 F,S. 

ED 642 Research Applications in Curriculum and Instruction. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 648 Theory and Process in Reading and Language Arts. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 665 Supervising Student Teachers. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 687 Seminar in Curriculum and Instruction. 1-3 S. 

Educational Administration and Supervision 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. G. Taylor Jr., Head 

Professor: C. J. Dolce; Visiting Professor: A. A. Glatthorn; Adjunct Professor: C. 
R. Coble; Associate Professors: B. G. Beezer, W. B. Harvey, E. MacPhail- 
Wilcox, J. C. Marshall, R. C. Serow; Visiting Associate Professor: R. H. Forbes; 
Adjunct Associate Professor: J. S. Pressley; Lecturer: R. T. Williams 

The graduate programs in educational administration and supervision have a 
multidisciplinary emphasis which includes courses in economics, politics, psy- 
chology and sociology as well as in professional education. Within the constraints 
required for certification, programs are planned individually, based on an analy- 
sis of the student's career objectives and competencies. In addition to formal 
courses, planned non-credit experiences are offered to enhance the student's 
professional development. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 141 

The master's degree programs (M.S., M.Ed.), which require a minimum of 30 
or 36 credit hours, are designed to prepare individuals for entry-level adminis- 
trative positions in public schools, colleges and other educational agencies. The 
master's program must be completed within four years from the semester of 
admission. An intermediate (sixth-year certificate) program, which leads to the 
second level of certification, is also available for public school personnel. 

The doctoral degree program (Ed.D.), which requires extensive work in 
research and clinical practice (internship), is designed to prepare individuals for 
advanced administrative and supervisory positions in public schools, education 
service agencies, education policy positions and higher education. One academic 
year of full-time residency is required. The doctoral program must be completed 
within six years from the semester of admission. In addition, an Ed.D. degree in 
elementary and secondary administration is offered in Greenville, NC, in cooper- 
ation with East Carolina University. 

In addition to admission requirements of the Graduate School, there are two 
additional requirements: a recent Graduate Record Examination score (both 
verbal and quantitative), a Miller's Analogy Test and a narrative statement 
which describes in detail the applicant's career objectives and specific objectives 
for enrolling in the graduate program. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 514 Formative Ideas in American Education. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 515 Education and Social Diversity. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 518 Introduction to Education Law, 3(3-0) S. 

ED 532 Introduction to Educational Inquiry. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 54 IB Practicum in Education Administration. 1-6 F,S. 

ED 550 Principles of Educational Administration. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 569 The Principalship. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 578 Law and Higher Education. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 580 Evaluation Theory and Practice in Education. 3(3-0) F. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 614 Contemporary Educational Thought. 3(3-0) Alt. S. 

ED 616 History of Higher Education in the United States. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 

ED 618 School Law for the Administrator. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 620 Cases in Educational Administration. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 632 Applied Research Methods in Education. S(l-U) S. 

ED 697 Problems of Research Design in Education. 1-3 S. Alt. yrs. 



142 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Industrial and Technical Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor E. I. Farmer, Coordinator 

Professors Emeriti: D. M. Hanson, J. T. Nerden; Associate Professor Emeritus: F. 
S. Smith; Assistant Professor Emeritus: T. C. Shore Jr. 

The program in industrial and technical education provides graduate work 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Master of Education and to the 
intermediate (sixth-year) certificate in vocational industrial education. The 
rapid development of industrial and technical education in North Carolina and 
throughout the nation provides opportunities for teachers, supervisors and 
administrators who have earned advanced degrees. 

The facilities at the University allow supporting courses at the graduate level 
in the related fields of computer science, economics and business, engineering, 
guidance and personnel services, mathematics, psychology, sociology and statis- 
tics. The prerequisite for graduate work in the programs in industrial and 
technical education is a proficiency in the undergraduate courses required for 
the bachelor's degree in industrial or technical education or a substantial 
equivalent. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ED 42 1 Principles and Practices in Industrial Cooperative Training. Preqs.: ED 327, 
3U, 305. 3(3-0) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES* 

ED 525 Advanced Trade Analysis and Course Construction. 3(3-0) F. 
FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 609 Planning and Organizing Industrial and Technical Education Programs. 

3(3-0) F. 

*For other courses, see occupational education. 

Industrial Arts Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor R. E. Peterson, Coordinator 

Professor Emeritus: D. W. Olson; Associate Professors: R. E. Peterson, R. E. 
Wenig; Associate Prof essor Emeritus: T. B. Young; Assistant Professors: V. W. 
DeLuca, W. J. Haynie III 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 143 



The industrial arts education program offers graduate work leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science, Master of Education and Doctor of Education. 
Graduate programs are designed for teachers who wish to develop their instruc- 
tional competencies and for those who wish to be supervisors and administrators 
of industrial arts programs. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSE 

I A 480 Modern Industries. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(3-0) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

I A 510 Design for Industrial Arts Teachers. Preqs.: Six hours of drawing, IA 231 or 
equivalent. 3(2-8) Sum. A study of new developments in the field of design with emphasis on 
the relationship of material and form in the selection and designing of industrial arts 
projects. Graduate Staff 

IA 560 New Developments in Industrial Arts Education. Preqs.: Twelve hours of 
education and teaching experience. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. This course is a study of the new 
developments in industrial arts education. It is designed to assist teachers and administra- 
tors in developing new concepts and new content based on the changes in technology. 

Graduate Staff 

IA 582 Visual Communications in Industrial Arts Education. Preq.: Advanced stand- 
ing in IAEor CI. 3(2-2) S. Alt. yrs. Designed to enable teachers to understand key technical 
developments in the area of visual communications. Emphasis is upon developing pilot 
testing and evaluating a sequence of laboratory activities for school environment. 

Peterson 

ED 588 Advanced Teaching Methods in Industrial Arts Education.^-^ F,Sum. 

I A 590 Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts. Preqs.: Sr. standing, CI. Maximum 6. 
F,S,Sum. Courses based on individual problems and designed to give advanced majors in 
industrial arts education the opportunity to broaden or intensify their knowledge and 
abilities through investigation and research in the various fields of industrial arts, such as 
metals, plastics, ceramics or electricity-electronics. Graduate Staff 

I A 595 Industrial Arts Workshop. Preq.: One or more years of teaching experience. 3(3-0) 
Sum. A course for experienced teachers, administrators and supervisors of industrial arts. 
The primary purpose will be to develop sound principles and practices for initiating, 
conducting and evaluating programs in this field. Enrollees will pool their knowledge and 
practical experiences and will do intensive research work on individual and group 
problems. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 630 Philosophy of Industrial Arts. 2(2-0) F,S. 

ED 635 Administration and Supervision of Industrial Arts. 2(2-0) F,S. 



144 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



I A 645 Technology and Industrial Arts. Preqs.: I A 560, ED 630. 3(3-0) F,S. Technology: 
its nature, origins, advance. Impact of technological advance on man and culture. Technol- 
ogy as the material culture. Changing concepts of work, skill, occupations, discretionary 
time. Technology and its relation to industrial arts education. Graduate Staff 

ED 692 Seminar in Industrial Arts Education. 1(1-0) F,S. 



Mathematics and Science Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor A. C. Howe, Head 

Professors: N. D. Anderson, L. M. Clark, J. R. Kolb; Professor Emeritus: H. E. 
Speece; Associate Professors: W. M. Waters Jr., L. W. Watson, J. H. Wheatley; 
Associate Professor Emeritus: H. A. Shannon; Assistant Professor: L. V. Stiff; 
Visiting Assistant Professor: J. C. Park 

The Department of Mathematics and Science Education offers graduate work 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science, Master of Education and Doctor of 
Philosophy with majors in mathematics education or in science education and 
intermediate level certification in both fields. Each student's program is individ- 
ually planned by a graduate committee and will reflect the student's undergrad- 
uate and graduate preparation, teaching experience and future professional 
plans. Students take courses in both professional education and in their teaching 
specialties. Areas of specialization include mathematics, biological sciences, 
earth science, chemistry and physics. 

Doctoral students are required to have a reading knowledge of one modern 
foreign language. Additional communication skills may be required by the ad- 
visory committee. Independent reading and participation in seminars are an 
indispensable part of the doctoral program. The heart of the program is the 
dissertation, a document based on original research that makes a significant 
contribution to science education or mathematics education. 

Applicants must meet the admissions requirements of the Graduate School and 
have departmental approval. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 511 Implications of Mathematical Content, Structure, and Processes for the 
Teaching of Mathematics in the Elementary School. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Alt. yrs. 

ED 512 Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Junior High School. 3(3-0) 
S,Sum. Ait. yrs. 

ED 526 Teaching in College. 3(3-0) Sum. 

ED 570 Foundations of Mathematics Education. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Alt. yrs. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 145 

ED 575 Foundations of Science Education. 3(3-0) S,Sum., Alt. yrs. 

ED 577 Improving Classroom Instruction in Science. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 592 Special Problems in Mathematics Teaching. 1-3 F,S,Sum. 

ED 594 Special Problems in Science Teaching. 1-6 F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 603 Teaching Mathematics and Science in Higher Education. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 604 Curriculum Development and Evaluation in Science and Mathematics. 

3(3-0) S. 

ED 605 Education and Supervision of Teachers of Mathematics and Science. 3(3-0) 
S. 

ED 641D Practicum in Science and Mathematics Education. 1-6 F,S. 

ED 690 Seminar in Mathematics Education. 2(2-0) F,S. 

ED 695 Seminar in Science Education. 2(2-0) F,S. 

Occupational Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor 3. R. Clary, Head 

Associate Professor: L. R. Jewell, Graduate Administrator 

Professor: J. K. Coster; Professors Emeriti: D. M. Hanson, J. T. Nerden, D. W. 
Olson, C. C. Scarborough; Associate Professors: J. L. Burrow, L. S. Dillon, E. I. 
Farmer, R. E. Peterson, R. E. Wenig; Associate Professors Emeriti: C. D. 
Bryant, W. L. Cox Jr., T. R. Miller, F. S. Smith; Assistant Professors: J. L. 
Crow, V. W. DeLuca, J. L. Flowers, W. J. Haynie III, B. J. Malpiedi, R. M. 
Patterson, W. J. Vander Wall; Visiting Assistant Professor: M. M. Turnbull; 
Adjunct Assistant Professors: C. B. Belcher, B. M. Patterson; Assistant Profes- 
sor Emeritus: T. C. Shore Jr. 

The Department of Occupational Education includes programs leading to 
advanced degrees in the program areas of agricultural education, health occupa- 
tions education, industrial and technical education, and industrial arts educa- 
tion. For descriptions of the advanced degree programs in these areas, see earlier 
sections in education. In addition, the department offers advanced degree pro- 
grams in occupational education and courses leading to certification in the 
teaching of middle grades occupational exploration. 

This section of the catalog describes the advanced programs in occupational 
education per se; that is, programs in which the major is occupational education. 



146 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The department offers leadership development programs in occupational educa- 
tion for the Master of Education and Master of Science degrees, the Intermediate 
(Sixth- Year) Program, and Doctor of Education degree. 

The master's programs are designed to prepare persons for entry-level admi- 
nistrative and supervisory positions in occupational education. However, stu- 
dents may prepare for other careers, such as master teachers of career explora- 
tion programs. 

The master's programs require a minimum of 36 semester hours of graduate 
work, including 27 hours in the major. Additional hours will be specified by the 
student's advisory committee for those who do not have a baccalaureate degree in 
an occupational education field. Students who elect the Master of Science substi- 
tute the thesis for part of the course load. 

The Intermediate (Sixth-Year) Program requires a minimum of 60 semester 
hours of graduate work, including 48 hours in the major. 

The primary purpose of the doctoral program is to prepare persons for 
advanced positions in occupational education. Students may elect to prepare for 
such positions as administrator, research specialist, curriculum development 
specialist or teacher educator in occupational education. A minimum number of 
90 semester hours of graduate work beyond the baccalaureate degree is specified 
for the doctoral program. Emphasis is placed on developing competencies, and 
students may be advised to supplement their course work. 

Applicants to the graduate level programs must take the Graduate Record 
Examination or the Miller Analogies Test and submit a resume of work expe- 
rience with a statement of career goals. Application processes must be completed 
within six months of the date the application is received. 

All doctoral programs require a minimum of one year of full-time resident 
status devoted to the program and programs must be completed within six years 
from the beginning of the semester in which the student is initially enrolled in the 
doctoral classification. Other department policies should be requested from the 
graduate administrator. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 516 Analysis of Occupational Information, Trends and the Labor Market. S(S-O) 
S. 

ED 522 Career Exploration. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 527 Philosophy of Occupational Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 528 Cooperative Occupational Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 529 Curriculum Materials Development. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 541A Practicum in Occupational Education. 1-6 F,S. 

ED 593 Special Problems in Occupational Education. 1-6 F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 609 Planning and Organizing Industrial and Technical Education Programs. 
S(S-O) F. Alt. yrs. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 147 

ED 610 Administration of Occupational Education. 8(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 6 1 1 Laws, Regulations and Policies Affecting Occupational Education. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 612 Finance, Accounting, and Management of Occupational Education Pro- 
grams. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 688 Research Application in Occupational Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 693 Advanced Special Problems in Occupational Education. 1-6 F,S,Sum. 

Health Occupations Education 

Assistant Professor J. A. Davis, Coordinator 

The master's degree level program track in health occupations teacher educa- 
tion has been established in response to an increasing need for accountability in 
professional education and for qualified educators in the health fields. The pro- 
gram is designed to provide a broad comprehension of the health care delivery 
system and the education of future providers of service and to develop compet- 
ency in curriculum and instruction planning and implementation. Students 
desiring to move into administrative and supervisory roles are encouraged to 
design a plan of study consistent with their personal goals. Students must hold 
credentials in one of the health disciplines and have knowledge of the health care 
system. 

Students will be encouraged to participate in the interinstitutional cooperative 
program that exists between the Graduate Schools of North Carolina State Uni- 
versity, Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
which makes available a vast array of offerings in the health field from which to 
select courses. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSE 

ED 433 Health Occupations Specialty Practicum. Preq.: Current credential in a recog- 
nized health discipline. 6 Arranged. F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 555 Issues and Trends in Education for the Allied Health Professions. 3(3-0) Alt. 
yrs. 

ED 581 Curriculum and Instruction in the Allied Health Professions. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. 

ED 584 Health Care Delivery Systems and Environments. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 641 J Practicum in Health Occupations. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. 



148 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Training and Development 

Associate Professor L. S. Dillon, Coordinator 

Human resource development is a field which deals with the quality of work 
life, productivity and the satisfaction and development of human resources. 
Within this field, nine distinct areas may be defined: organization development, 
organization and job design, planning, selection and staffing, personnel research, 
compensation and benefits, employee assistance, union and labor relations, and 
training and development. The focus of training and development is to identify 
and, through planned learning activities, help to develop the key competencies 
which enable individuals to perform current or future jobs. 

Students may pursue either the Master of Education or the Master of Science 
degree. Both degrees require a minimum of 36 hours. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 



ED 587 Organization and Operation of Training and Development Programs. 3(3- 
0)F. 

ED 595 Methods and Techniques of Training and Development. 3(3-0) S. 



Psychology 

For a listing of departmental faculty and courses, see psychology. 

Education Courses 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 500 Community College and Two-year Postsecondary Education.Pra?.: Grad. 
standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F,S. Comprehensive community colleges and technical 
institutes and the state systems of which they are a part: underlying concepts, educational 
needs they are designed to serve, role in meeting these needs, historical development, issues 
in the establishment and operation of state systems and individual institutions, unresolved 
issues and emerging trends. Graduate Staff 

ED 501 Computer Applications in Instruction. Preq.: Six hrs. ED or PSY or CI. 3(3-0) 
F,S. Emphasis is on the use and evaluation of existing educational software and research 
findings with respect to the uses of computers in instruction. Martorella, Vasu 

ED 502 The School Curriculum. Preq.: 12 semester hours ED and PSYor CI. 3(3-0) F. A 
study of the origin, development, and current status of the elementary and secondary school 
curriculum and an evaluation of the trends and issues likely to influence the curriculum in 
the future. Parramore 

ED 503 The Programming Process in Adult and Community College Education. 
Preqs.: ED 501, CI. 3(3-0) F,S. The principles and processes involved in programming, 
including basic theories and concepts supporting the programming process. Attention will 
be given to the general framework in which programming is done, the organization needed 
and the program roles of both professional and lay leaders. Boone 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 149 



ED 504 Social Studies in the Elementary School. Preq.: Six hours in ED. 3(3-0) F. 
Advanced professional training in the teaching of social studies for middle grades and 
elementary teachers, including an in-depth introduction to research-based teaching 
strategies, instructional resources and the literature of the field. Martorella 

ED 505 Public Area Schools. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F. Junior and 
community colleges, technical institutes, vocational schools and branches of universities: 
their development, status and prospects, policy and policy-making, clientele, purposes, 
evaluation programs, personnel, organization administration, financing, facilities, re- 
search and development functions. Graduate Staff 

ED 506 Education of Exceptional Children. Preq.: 9 hours of ED or PSY. 3(3-0) 
F,S,Sum. An introduction to the field of Special Education. The course focuses on the 
historical overview, definitions and terminology in the basic areas of exceptionality; etio- 
logical factors in exceptionality; developmental and learning characteristics of each area of 
exceptionality; and educational settings and strategies employed in special education. A 
review is given of current educational laws and policies affecting special education. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 507 Foundations of Middle Years Education. Preq.: 6 hours of ED and PSY. 3(3-0) 
F,S. Five major aspects of middle years education are examined: (a) the history and 
purposes of middle/junior high school, (b) pre- and early adolescent needs, interests and 
abilities, (c) curriculum design and content, (d) teaching methods and (e) school organiza- 
tion. Both theoretical understandings and effective classroom strategies will be empha- 
sized. Arnold 

ED 508 Education of Severely Handicapped. Preq.: ED 531 or ED 57k or CI. 3(3-0) F. 
A study of severe and profound mental retardation and autism, including assessment 
procedures, educational and social/vocational programs, instructional strategies and eva- 
luation. Legal and ethical issues involved in working with the severely handicapped are 
examined. Graduate Staff 

ED 509 Methods and Materials— Teaching Retarded Children. Preqs.: ED 506 and 
ED 531 or CI. 3(3-0) S. A study of the methods and materials related to teaching mentally 
retarded school age children. Course will include the study of the learning and behavioral 
characteristics and educational programs for the mentally retarded in the areas of motor, 
communications, social, academic and vocational development. Crossland 

ED 510 Adult Education: History, Philosophy, Contemporary Nature. Preqs.: 
Advanced undergrade CI. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of the historical and philosophical founda- 
tions of adult education from ancient times to the present, giving attention to key figures, 
issues, institutions, movements and programs, including consideration of the relationship 
between adult education's historical development and prevailing intellectual, social, eco- 
nomic and political conditions. Consideration of adult education's contemporary nature, 
present-day schools of thought on its objectives and trends. Carter 

ED 511 Implications of Mathematical Content, Structure, and Processes for the 
Teaching of Mathematics in the Elementary School. Preq.: Bachelor's degree in elemen- 
tary education or CI. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Alt. yrs. Designed for teachers and supervisors of 
mathematics in the elementary or middle school. Special emphasis on implications of 
mathematical content, structure, and processes in teaching arithmetic and geometry. 

Waters, Watson 

ED 512 Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Junior High School. Preq.: ED 
k71 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Alt. yrs. Comprehensive study of teaching mathematics in 
elementary and junior high schools. Major emphasis on building skills in teaching arith- 
metic, elementary algebra and intuitive geometry. Thorough search of the literature 
relative to the mathematics curricula will be conducted, designing and sequencing of 



150 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



learning activities, teaching mathematical concepts and relationships, building skill in 
computation, reading mathematics, problem solving and measurement will be covered. 

Kolb, Watson 

ED 513 Introduction to Issues and Techniques in Visual Impairments. Preq.: ED 506. 
S(S-O) F. Addresses historical developments, trends, issues and basic skill techniques for the 
visually impaired. Includes societal perceptions, societal integration, effects of a visual 
impairment on development, psychosocial adjustment and Braille transcription skills. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 514 Formative Ideas in American Education. Preq.: Six hours ED or PSYorCI. 
S(S-O) F. A consideration of the theory and practice of American education as an extension 
of the philosophical climate of opinion of different intellectual ages and how the present 
status of our educational system is grounded in the thought of the past. Beezer 

ED 515 Education and Social Diversity. Preq.: Six hours ED, PSY and/or social 
science. 3(3-0) Alt. S. An overview of the role of education within a culturally diverse 
society. Major attention is directed to racial, ethnic, socioeconomic and regional subpopula- 
tions. Among the issues to be discussed are the subcultural influences on public school 
performances, equality of educational opportunity, social stratification and mobility and 
the impact of schooling on intergroup relations. Serow 

ED 516 Analysis of Occupational Information, Trends and the Labor Market. Preq.: 
Six hrs. of ED. 3(3-0) S. Overview of federal, state and local sources of labor market 
information. Analysis of labor market concepts and applications for career exploration and 
decision making. Use of community surveys in vocational program planning. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 517 Administrative Technology in Education. Preqs.: ED 550 or equivalent and 
ED 532 or equivalent or CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Designed to provide professional educators 
and human service planners with planning and management techniques using current 
information and communication technologies. Students use both equipment and procedu- 
ral applications for financial planning, data base management, case management, schedul- 
ing, modeling and other management techniques. Ballenger, MacPhail-Wilcox 

ED 518 Introduction to Education Law. Preq.: Six hours graduate credit. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of constitutional, statutory and case law as it relates to the elementary and secondary 
public school settings, particularly in the areas of students, teachers and liability. Particu- 
lar emphasis is placed on North Carolina and federal law. Beezer 

ED 519 Early Childhood Education. Preq.: PSY 475 or PSY 576. 3(1-4) S. Planning, 
selecting and using human resources, activities, materials and facilities in the education of 
young children. Student observation, participation and evaluation of educational experien- 
ces for the developmental level of individual children for an optimum learning environ- 
ment. A synthesis of the student's knowledge of human development, learning theory and 
research findings as related to classroom application. Graduate Staff 

ED 520 Introduction to Guidance and Counseling. Preq.: Six hours in ED or PSY. 
3(3-0) F,S,Sum. An introduction to the philosophies, theories, principles and issues of 
guidance and counseling services, with major emphasis on guidance at the secondary school 
level. Graduate Staff 

ED 521 Internship in Guidance and Personnel Services. Preqs.: Eighteen hours in 
department and CI. Credits Arranged. F,S. A continuous full-time internship of at least 
one-half semester. Framework of school and community. Work with students, teachers, 
administrators, guidance and pupil personnel workers, parents and resource personnel in 
the community. Supervision of intern by guidance personnel in school as well as by course 
instructors. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 151 



ED 522 Career Exploration. Preq.: 12 hours ED or CI. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. This course is 
designed for teachers in the public schools of North Carolina who teach in "Career Explora- 
tion" programs. The course emphasizes the philosophy of career exploration, theories 
supporting career exploration, the place of exploration programs in the overall school 
curriculum, correlation of occupational information in academic subjects, sources of occu- 
pational information and its use and approaches to teaching in a career exploration 
program. Clary, Dillon 

ED 523 Orientation and Mobility of the Visually Impaired. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F. The 
sensory processes and sensory cues on which independent mobility depends for the visually 
impaired person. Various techniques and modes of travel considered. Emphasis given to 
instruction and background which will enable person not teaching orientation mobility as a 
skill to reinforce the learning that takes place in other situations. Graduate Staff 

ED 524 Career Counseling and Development. Preq.: Six hours of ED or PSY. 3(3-0) 
S,Sum. Knowledge and skills needed to: (a) provide professional career counseling to 
individuals and (b) design, implement and evaluate career development programs for 
particular groups. Areas of study include: theories of career development and decision 
making; career guidance programs in educational, agency and industrial setting; career 
information sources and delivery systems; and assessment in career counseling. 

Gerler, Jones 

ED 525 Advanced Trade Analysis and Course Construction. Preq.: 12 hours ED or CI. 
3(3-0) F. Principles and practices in analyzing occupations for the purpose of determining 
teaching content. Practice in the principles underlying industrial course organization 
based on occupational analysis covering instruction skills and technology and including 
course outlines, job sequences, the development of industrial materials and instructional 
schedules. Graduate Staff 

ED 526 Teaching in College. 3(3-0) Sum. This course focuses on the development of 
competencies to perform the fundamental tasks of a college teacher as well as consideration 
of more long-range tasks such as course development and the university responsibilities of a 
professor. In addition to attending lectures and other types of presentations, students will 
make video tapes of their teaching, develop tests, design introductory courses in their 
teaching fields and consider current issues related to university and college teaching. 

Anderson 

ED 527 Philosophy of Occupational Education. Preq.: 12 hours ED or CI. 3(3-0) F,S. 
An historical and philosophical investigation into the social and economic aspects of occu- 
pational education; an overview of the broad field of occupational education for youth and 
adults, with emphasis upon the trends and problems connected with the conduct of occupa- 
tional education under federal and state guidance. An overview study of federal and state 
legislation pertaining to occupational education. Malpiedi 

ED 528 Cooperative Occupational Education. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 
3(3-0) F,S. Designed for individuals preparing to be directors, administrators or supervi- 
sors of occupational education programs at the local, state and/or national levels. Emphasis 
on organization and operation of cooperative occupational education programs. Covers the 
entire field of cooperative occupational education on secondary, postsecondary and adult 
levels with references to accepted essentials of cooperative education so details of planning, 
organization, establishment and operation of cooperative occupational programs will be 
practical and meaningful. Student visitations to existing quality programs in cooperative 
occupational education to study on-site conditions in specialized areas. Dillon 

ED 529 Curriculum Materials Development. Preqs.: Grad. standing and ED 527 or 
ED 630 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Selection and organization of curricula and instructional 
materials in occupational education. Dillon 



152 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



ED 530 Theories and Techniques of Counseling. Preq.: Six hours of ED or PSY; Coreq.: 
ED 520 or equivalent. S(S-O) F,S,Sum. A combination of the study of theory and philosophy 
in counseling with techniques of counseling. Topics to be examined include behavioral 
approaches, psychoanalytic approaches, client-centered counseling, existential counseling 
and relationship models, and their relation to counseling. For each theory, the techniques 
are related to the theoretical concepts and principles. Locke 

ED 531 Mental Retardation. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) F. The definitions, classifica- 
tions, diagnostic and treatment procedures for mental retardation are examined from 
medical, sociological and educational points of view. Categories of retardation examined 
include mild, moderate, severe and profound. Graduate Staff 

ED 532 Introduction to Educational Inquiry. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 
S(S-O) F.S.Sum. A survey of basic concepts and methods of educational inquiry. Emphasis 
is on the logic underlying various approaches to problem definition and solution and on the 
tools of the investigator, as well as on sources and interpretation of research information 
related to the student's particular area of study. Marshall 

ED 533 Group Counseling. Preq.: ED 530. 3(3-0) F,Sum. A study of the theory and 
principles of effective group work and the skills necessary for using specific counseling 
techniques, for the planning and organization of group counseling activities in the elemen- 
tary school, secondary school or other institutions. Supervised experience provides, to a 
limited extent, practice in the use of various techniques of group leadership in the area of 
interest for each student. Gerler, Locke 

ED 534 Guidance in Elementary and Middle Schools. Preq.: Six hours in ED or PSY. 
3(3-0) F. Introduces teachers, counselors and school administrators to the theory, practice 
and organization of elementary and middle school guidance programs. Gerler 

ED 535 Student Personnel Work in Higher Education. Preq.: Nine hours PSY or CI. 
3(3-0) F. Examines practices in various areas of student personnel work. Studies both 
structure and function of student personnel programs in higher education. Saidla 

ED 535 Structure and Function of the Eye and Use of Low Vision. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F. 
Special institute for participants to spend minimum of 45 hours in class and class related 
activities. Medical and educational consultants discuss structure and function of the eye, 
eye anomalies affecting children with low vision, methods of teaching children to use 
minimal vision effectively. Graduate Staff 

ED 537 The Extension and Public Service Function in Higher Education.Preg.. ED 

510. 3(3-0) S. An examination of the background, history, philosophy and contemporary 
nature of the extension and public service function of institutions of higher education in the 
United States. Emphasis is placed on the adult education role of public and private 
universities and colleges. Specific focus is on: general extension, industrial extension, 
engineering extension, cooperative extension and continuing education. Graduate Staff 

ED 538 Instructional Strategies in Adult and Community College Education. Preq.: 
Grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F. This course examines forms of instruction approp- 
riate for the teaching of adults. Special emphasis will be placed upon methods which 
maximally involve the adult learner. The study of concepts, theories and principles relevant 
to the selection, utilization and evaluation of instructional strategies will focus on the 
integration of theory into practice. Through participation in classroom exercises, the 
student will develop proficiency in using teaching techniques which are applicable in adult 
and community college education. Fingeret 

ED 539 Educational Gerontology. Preq.: Six hours in ED, SOC or PSY. 3(3-0) F. A 
broad overview of factors associated with the education of older adults. Various sociologi- 
cal, physiological, psychological and economic aspects of aging are explored in terms of 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 153 



their educational implications. Attention is given to knowledge and skills required for the 
development of educational programs for the aging population. Glass 

ED 540 Career/Vocational Education for the Handicapped. Preqs.: ED 506 and ED 
527 or CI. 3(3-0) S.Relevant definitions and current legislation and policies are reviewed. 
Appropriate curriculum, methods and materials are studied. Topic areas include program 
development, vocational evaluation, job placement and support services for the handi- 
capped. Clary 

ED 541 A Practicum in Occupational Education. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 
1-6 F,S. Under a faculty-supervised practicum in an educational, industrial or governmen- 
tal setting, the student participates in and analyzes activities associated with the planning, 
implementation and evaluation of instructional programs or services in vocational educa- 
tion. A unique plan is developed by the student and approved by the supervisor. Clary 

ED 541B Practicum in Education Administration. Preqs.: ED 550 and CI. 1-6 F,S. 
Supervised experience in an appropriate educational setting to enable the student to gain 
practice in applying concepts, principles and theories of education administration. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 542 Contemporary Approaches in the Teaching of Social Studies. Preqs.: 
Advanced undergrad. or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. An analysis of the principles, strategies 
and application of new teaching approaches. Includes structured projects and practical 
experiences. Harper, Martorella 

ED 543 Adulthood and Learning: The Later Years. Preq.: ED 539 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. A study of basic sensory, attitudinal, intellectual and emotional changes that occur in 
individuals during the process of growing old and the implications of these changes for 
developing, implementing and evaluating educational programs for and with older adults. 

Glass 

ED 544 The Teaching of Composition. Preq.: 9 hours of ED, PSY and/or ENG. 3(3-0) S. 
For classroom teachers. Offers practical field-tested ideas to help students improve as 
writers by focusing on composition as a process as well as a product. Activities for teaching 
prewriting, composing, revising, proofreading, grammar and evaluating will be practiced, 
with suggestions for individual group learning. Research related to effective composition 
teaching will be reviewed. Pritchard 

ED 545 Reading in the Elementary School. Preqs.: Six hours ED or PSY. 3(3-0) F. Alt. 
yrs. Theoretical foundations of reading instruction and current methods and materials for 
teaching reading, with an emphasis on planning and implementing reading programs for 
children in kindergarten through grade six. Fox 

ED 546 Reading in the Content Areas. Preqs.: Six hours in ED or PSY. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 
Methods in instruction for applying reading to content areas, with emphasis on means of 
improving comprehension, vocabulary and study skills in subject matter classrooms. 

Abernathy 

ED 547 Language Arts in the Elementary School. Preq.: Six hours in ED. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. Advanced professional training in the teaching of language arts for middle grades and 
elementary teachers, including an in-depth introduction to research-based teaching 
strategies, new instructional resources and the literature on the field. Fox 

ED 548 Development of Microcomputer Software for Instruction. Preq.: Six hrs. ED 
or PSY or CI. 3(3-1) F. Course topics covered are the instructional design principles 
underlying the development of microcomputer-based instructional software and accom- 
panying materials and programming principles and their implementation in courseware 
development. Additional topics include authoring languages, programming languages and 
graphics. Vasu 



154 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 549 Reading for the Middle Years. Preq.: Twelve hours in ED orPSY. 3(3-0) Alt. S. 
An investigation of issues related to middle years reading development, transition of 
reading skills to content areas and aspects of middle years reading program organization. 

Fox 

ED 550 Principles of Educational Administration. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. 3(3-0) 
F,S. This course is designed as an introductory course in educational administration. 
Emphasizing basic principles of administration, the course will draw upon administrative 
theory, business and public administration models as well as theoretical constructs from 
various disciplines. MacPhail-Wilcox 

ED 551 Principles and Practices of Supervision. Preqs.: 6 semester hours ED/PSY 
graduate study and CI. 3(3-0) S. Designed to provide the educational leader with an 
understanding of the nature of instructional supervision, skills needed in supervising 
educational programs and an analysis of promising practices for improving programs. 
Opportunity is provided for application of principles of supervision to one or more practical 
problems. Parramore 

ED 553 Community Service Agencies. Preq.: Six semester hours of ED, PS Y or SOC or 
CI. 3(3-0). F. An introduction to the issues, functions, and scope of the work being done in 
various human service agency programs; an overview of helping approaches with selected 
client populations; related professional concerns will be examined. Sprinthall 

ED 554 Planning Programs in Agricultural Education. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS 
status. 3(3-0) F,S. Consideration of the need for planning programs in education; objectives 
and evaluation of community programs; use of advisory group; organization and use of 
facilities. Graduate Staff 

ED 555 Issues and Trends in Education for the Allied Health Professions. Preq.: 
Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. An analysis of educational and social factors influenc- 
ing change in health professions education. Emphasis will be on problems of student 
selection and program articulation and the implications for health occupations education 
and health services of recent legislation regarding the handicapped. Patterson 

ED 556 Learning Disabilities. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) F. A study of the field of 
learning disabilities, including definitions, prevalence, etiology, characteristics and cur- 
rent educational trends for educating learning disabled students. Crossland 

ED 557 Methods and Materials in Learning Disabilities. Preq.: ED 556 or CI. 3(3-0) S. 
A study of the current methods and materials for the teach ing of learning disabled students 
in the elementary and/or secondary schools, including curriculum and instructional tech- 
niques. Course will focus on examination of commercial materials and the development of 
teacher-made materials for use with the learning disabled student. Crossland 

ED 558 Resource Teaching in Special Education. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) F. A 
study of resource teaching in the area of special education, with emphasis on resource 
teaching with the learning disabled and mentally retarded. Course will focus on types of 
resource programs, how to establish and maintain a program, selection of students, curric- 
ulum and materials. Graduate Staff 

ED 559 The Adult Learner. Preq.: Six hours in ED. 3(3-0) S. Principles involved in adult 
education programs including theories and concepts undergirding and requisite to these 
programs. Emphasis will be given to interrelationship of the nature of adult learning, the 
nature of the subject matter and the setting in which learning occurs. The applicability of 
relevant principles and pertinent research findings to adult learning will be thoroughly 
treated. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 155 



ED 560 Teaching through the Arts. Preq.: 6 h rs. in ED and/or PSY. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
Examines the role of the arts in the teaching/learning process, emphasizing ways class- 
room teachers can use the arts to foster students' personal growth, creativity and academic 
achievement. Develops teaching skills through explorations in graphic arts, sculpture, 
dance/movement, drama, film, creative writing and poetry. Graduate Staff 

ED 561 Educational Diagnosis and Prescription for Exceptional Children. Preq.: 
ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) S. A study of the concept of educational diagnosis of exceptional 
students, including an examination of educational diagnostic procedures in current use in 
special education. Course will focus on the development of informal diagnostic techniques 
and procedures for adapting curriculum and instruction for the exceptional learner. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 562 Communication Disorders in the Classroom. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. A study of communication disorders which occur in the school age population, includ- 
ing types of disorders, prevalence, etiology, characteristics and corrective therapy. Course 
will focus on communication disorders among exceptional students and the classroom 
teacher's role in working with communication disorders. Crossland 

ED 563 Effective Teaching. Preq.: Twelve hours ED including student teaching. 3(3-0) F. 
Analysis of the teaching-learning process; assumptions that underlie course approaches; 
identifying problems of importance; problem solution for effective learning; evaluation of 
teaching and learning; making specific plans for effective teaching. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 564 Classroom Management in Special Education. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of the concepts and procedures involved in the design and implementation of tech- 
niques for managing exceptional students in a classroom setting. Course will focus on 
methods for increasing and maintaining appropriate classroom behaviors in exceptional 
learners. Graduate Staff 

ED 565 Agricultural Occupations. Preq.: 12 hours ED or CI. 3(3-0) F,S. The theory of 
education and work is related to the expanding field of agricultural occupations. Career 
development in agricultural occupations is associated with curriculum development needs. 
Occupational experience in agriculture is seen in relation to the curriculum and the 
placement in agricultural occupations. Graduate Staff 

ED 566 Occupational Experience in Agriculture. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 
3(3-0) F,S. A major and critical element in all programs of vocational education is the 
provision for appropriate student learning experiences in a real and simulated employment 
environment. Due to recent developments in education and agriculture, new and expanded 
concepts of occupational experience have been devised. Current research substantiates the 
need and desire of teachers of agriculture for assistance in implementing the new concepts. 
The course is designed not only to provide this aid but to develop a depth of understanding of 
the theoretical foundations underlying the new developments in occupational experiences 
to stimulate individual growth and creativity in implementing further developments. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 567 Education of Special Adults Populations. 3(3-0) S, Sum. Analyzing and devel- 
oping adult education responses to the needs and characteristics of special adult popula- 
tions such as nonliterate, unemployed, handicapped and older adults. Fingeret 

ED 568 Adult Education in Agriculture. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) 
F,S. Designed to meet the needs of leaders in adult education. Opportunity to study some of 
the basic problems and values in working with adult groups. Attention will be given to the 
problem of fitting the educational program for adults into the public school program and 
other educational programs as well as to the methods of teaching adults. Flowers 



156 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



ED 569 The Principalship. Preq.: ED 550 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A survey course 
covering the major responsibilities and tasks of a school principal, e.g., curriculum and 
instructional leadership, teacher recruitment and selection, fiscal record keeping, pupil 
schedules, plant management. Students will combine findings from their readings with 
present practices to develop workable solutions to managerial and instructional problems. 

MacPhail-Wilcox 

ED 570 Foundations of Mathematics Education. Preq.: ED k71 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
Sum. A course on the current status of mathematics education with special emphasis on the 
study and critical analysis of current practices in mathematics instruction from elemen- 
tary school through college. Graduate Staff 

ED 57 1 Introduction to the Gifted Individual. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) F. A study of 
theories and concepts of giftedness and procedures in identifying the gifted, with a consid- 
eration of factors influencing giftedness and ways it may be fostered. Aubrecht 

ED 572 Methods for Teaching the Gifted. Preq.: ED 571 or CI. 3(3-0) S. A study of 
major approaches used in the education of the gifted, including an opportunity to develop a 
unit plan based upon one of these approaches. Aubrecht 

ED 573 Behavior Disorders. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) F. A study of definitions, 
etiology, characteristics, philosophies and approaches to educational programming for 
children and youth with behavior disorders, including the emotionally handicapped, autis- 
tic and socially maladjusted. Cullinan 

ED 574 Methods and Materials: Behavior Disorders. Preq.: ED 573 or CI. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of curriculum materials, instructional strategies and behavior management tech- 
niques related to teaching behaviorally disordered children and youth, including individu- 
alized instruction, group process, organization and evaluation of classroom programs, 
parent involvement, community resources and teachers' personal and professional growth 
and development. Cullinan 

ED 575 Foundations of Science Education. Preq.: ED h 75 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 
Alt. yrs. Study and analysis of the philosophical, historical, sociological, political and 
economic factors affecting science education in the schools of the United States. Implica- 
tions for science education of various learning theories are examined along with models for 
curriculum development and program planning. Critical analysis of current trends, issues 
and problems in science education in terms of multiple perspectives. Anderson, Wheatley 

ED 576 Teaching/Learning Approaches for Emerging Adolescents. Preqs.: ED 507 
or equivalent; grad standing and CI. 3(3-0) S. Exploration of teaching/learning approaches 
appropriate to emerging adolescents. Topics include learning styles; interdisciplinary 
inquiry; community-based curriculum; simulations and games; learning centers; mini- 
courses; design of physical space; all-school activities. Arnold 

ED 577 Improving Classroom Instruction in Science. Preq.: ED U75 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) S. Application of major principles of education and psychology to the improvement of 
science teaching in elementary, middle and secondary schools. Emphasis on critical analy- 
sis of research and the development of research-based classroom applications. Topics 
include goals and objectives of science teaching, instructional strategies, development or 
selection of science materials, evaluation of achievement and elements of a desirable 
classroom climate. Graduate Staff 

ED 578 Law and Higher Education. Preq.: Six hours grad. credit. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A 
study of constitutional, statutory and case law as it relates to higher education. Emphasis is 
on faculty, student and staff rights and tort liability. Beezer 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 157 



ED 579 Concepts and Principles of Evaluation Applied to Non-formal Adult Educa- 
tion Programs. Preq.: ED 503 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Introduction to the evaluation of non-formal 
adult educational programs; course topics include the purposes of evaluation, alternative 
concepts and techniques, stake holders and their concerns, the specification of evidence, 
selection of standards for making judgments, gathering and analysis of data, use and 
dissemination of results and handling problems in evaluation. Graduate Staff 

ED 580 Evaluation Theory and Practice in Education. Preq.: ED 532 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) F. A review of educational program evaluation with emphasis on (1) theory and 
conceptual models of evaluation, (2) evaluation design, and (3) environmental practical 
factors influencing the design and implementation of evaluation studies. Marshall 

ED 581 Curriculum and Instruction in the Allied Health Professions. Preqs.: 
Advanced undergrad. or grad. standing and CI. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. A study of the elements of 
curriculum design and theoretical considerations for the development of curricula in the 
health occupations. Identification, analysis and evaluation of instructional strategies 
appropriate for clinical and classroom teaching. Patterson 

ED 582 Teaching Braille and Communication Skills. Preqs.: ED 513 and ED 5U5 or 

equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Information-access methods for visually impaired learners. Methods 
and materials for teaching Braille reading and selecting and teaching the use of electronic 
aids. Graduate Staff 

ED 583 Design and Evaluation of Instructional Materials. Preq.: Grad. standing. 
3(3-0) S. Emphasis is upon the characteristics and selection of various media for instruction 
and their use in educational settings. Instructional materials will be designed and pro- 
duced. Analysis of the research in the field is conducted. Projects and assignments are 
individualized. Application of grounded research and theory concerning learning to the 
design of instructional materials. Structured projects and practical experiences are used to 
transfer design principles and evaluate instructional products. Martorella 

ED 584 Health Care Delivery Systems and Environments. Preqs.: Grad. standing and 
CI. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. Organization of the health care delivery system, services andresources. 
Focus on the major social, economic, political and professional factors which contribute to 
shaping the system and influence change. Organizations and environments are analyzed in 
regard to the demand for health manpower and the implications for health occupations 
education. Patterson 

ED 585 Qualitative Research in Adult and Community College Education. Preq.: 
Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. Designing qualitative studies, conducting field work including 
open-ended interviews and participant observation, analyzing data and understanding 
theoretical and philosophical background of this research approach. Fingeret 

ED 586 Methods and Materials in Visual Impairments. Preqs.: ED 506, ED 513. 3(3-0) 
S. A study of current methods and materials for teaching visually impaired learners. 
Includes curriculum and materials development, adaptation, instructional techniques, 
educational assessment and diagnosis. Graduate Staff 

ED 587 Organization and Operation of Training and Development Programs. 3(3- 
0) F. Overview of occupational education as it is practiced in business and industrial 
settings. Roles common to training and development specialists are presented, including 
managerial concerns related to organizing, operating and financial training and develop- 
ment programs. Dillon 

ED 588 Advanced Teaching Methods in Industrial Arts Education. Preq.: ED 362 or 
equivalent. 3(2-2) F,Sum. An intensive examination of the teaching-learning process appli- 
cable to laboratory-classroom instruction. Instructional technology, evaluation, classroom 
control and management will be given attention. Wenig, Graduate Staff 



158 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



ED 589 Central Office Administration. Preq.: ED 550 or equ ivalent. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. A 
course covering the major responsibilities (except curriculum) of central office administra- 
tors in public school districts, e.g., pupil assignments, business affairs, personnel adminis- 
tration, construction and maintenance. Students will combine findings from their readings 
with present practices to develop workable procedures for solving managerial problems. 

McPhail-Wilcox 

ED 590 Special Problems in Guidance. Preqs.: Six hours grad. work in department or 
equivalent and CI. Maximum 6F.S. Intended for individual or group studies of one or more 
of the major problems in guidance and personnel work. Problems will be selected to meet 
the interests of individuals. The workshop procedure will be used whereby special projects, 
reports and research will be developed by individuals and by groups. Graduate Staff 

ED 591 Teaching Literature for Young Adults. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing or PBS 
status. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Designed to acquaint in-service and pre-service teachers with the 
breadth and diversity of contemporary literature for adolescents, with an emphasis on 
teaching young adult literature. Addresses the history and themes of young adult litera- 
ture, readability of materials, reading preferences, literary merit, skills that can be taught 
through literature, censorship, motivating students to read and organizing literature units. 

Pritchard 

ED 592 Special Problems in Mathematics Teaching. Preq.: ED h71 or equivalent. 1-3 
F.S.Sum. An in-depth investigation of topical problems in mathematics teaching chosen 
from the areas of curriculum, methodology, technology, supervision and research. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 593 Special Problems in Agricultural Education. Preqs.: Six hours grad. credit in 
agricultural education and CI. Credits Arranged. F,S.Sum. Opportunities for students to 
study current problems under the guidance of the staff. Graduate Staff 

ED 594 Special Problems in Science Teaching. Preq.: ED U76 or equivalent. 1-6 Sum. 
An in-depth investigation of topics in science education not covered in existing courses. 
Includes critical analysis of research and may include field work. May be offered on 
individual basis or as a class. Anderson, Howe, Wheatley 

ED 595 Methods and Techniques of Training and Development. 3(3-0) S. Methods 
and techniques common to model occupational education programs in business and indus- 
trial settings will be discussed. Course focuses on how to design and evaluate effective 
learning programs and instructional methodologies. Dillon 

ED 596 Topical Problems in Adult and Community College Education. Preq.: Grad. 
standing or PBS status. Credits arranged. F,S,Sum. Study and scientific analysis of prob- 
lems in adult education and preparation of a scholarly research type of paper. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 597 Special Problems in Education. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. IS 

F.S.Sum. Designed to provide graduate students in education opportunity to study problem 
areas in professional education under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 598 Special Problems in Curriculum and Instruction. Preqs.: Six hours of ED or 
PSY and CI. 1-6 F,S,Sum. Designed to provide an in-depth study of topical problems in 
curriculum and instruction selected from the areas of current concern to practitioners in 
education. Graduate Staff 

ED 599 Research Projects in Education. Preqs.: CI; ED 532 or equivalent. 1-3 F.S,Sum. 
A project or problem in research in education for graduate students, supervised by 
members of the graduate faculty. The research will be chosen on the basis of individual 
students' interests and is not to be part of thesis or dissertation research. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 159 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 600 Organizational Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. Preqs.: ED 503, PS 502, SOC 51*1. 3(3-0) F. This course is designed for 
present and potential administrators interested in increasing their understanding of 
organization as a basis for administering effective adult and community college education 
programs. Shearon 

ED 601 Administrative Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. Preq.: ED 600 or a comparable course(s) on organizational theory. 
8(8-0) S. Designed for persons interested in building a more consistent philosophy of 
educational administration, extending and strengthening their understanding of adminis- 
trative concepts and processes, improving their comprehension of the theoretical and 
research foundations upon which administrative processes are predicated, and increasing 
their ability to apply administrative concepts, theories and principles to the management of 
the complex education system. Graduate Staff 

ED 602 Curriculum Theory and Development. Preqs.: 9 semester hours graduate PSY, 
ED 502, ED 511* or CI. 3(3-0) F. A study of theory and research in the behavioral sciences 
and education designed to provide the theoretical background for the development of 
elementary and secondary curricula. The knowledge base and skills for critical review of 
curricula and instructional materials are explored and an opportunity to apply these is 
provided. Arnold, Parramore 

ED 603 Teaching Mathematics and Science in Higher Education. Preqs.: ED 570, 
592 or 591*, grad. standing, CI. 3(3-0) S. Collegiate mathematics and science instruction is 
examined with respect to goals and objectives, design of courses and curricula, innovative 
programs and facilities, and methods and materials for instruction. Graduate Staff 

ED 604 Curriculum Development and Evaluation in Science and Mathematics. 

Preqs.: 500-level statistics, ED 615 or PSY 535, CI. 3(3-0) S. A critical study of the elements 
of curriculum design and theory in mathematics education and science education and the 
examination of evaluation procedures for assessing educational innovations. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 605 Education and Supervision of Teachers of Mathematics and Science. Preqs.: 
ED 1*70 or 1*75 or equivalent, ED 570 or 592 or 591*. 3(3-0) S. Critical analysis of theories, 
programs and techniques designed to promote interpersonal interactions that will lead to 
more effective teaching of science and mathematics. Graduate Staff 

ED 606 Remediation of Reading Disabilities. Preq.: ED 51*7 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt yrs. 
Advanced approaches to reading remediation are examined including theory and research 
related to remedial instructional strategies, analyses of instructional designs and evalua- 
tions of the effectiveness of intervention programs. Fox 

ED (PS) 607 The Politics of Higher Education. 3(3-0). (See political science and public 
administration.) 

ED 609 Planning and Organizing Industrial and Technical Education Programs. 

Preqs.: ED 516 and grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. In this course a study will be made of the 
influences which impinge upon the development of programs of occupational education. 
Adequate opportunity will also be provided to examine in detail steps that may be taken to 
analyze needs for occupational education, to organize for its provision, to study its offerings 
and to evaluate its results. Graduate Staff 

ED 610 Administration of Occupational Education. Preq.: ED 527 or ED 630. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. An intensive study of the major elements of administrative practice applied to 
occupational education, as it is being conducted in comprehensive high schools, comprehen- 
sive community colleges, technical institutes and area vocational centers. Emphasis is 



160 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

placed upon leadership, personnel management, instructional program management and 
evaluation, public relations and financial management, in connection with preparatory, 
part-time, supplementary, extension and adult education program of occupational educa- 
tion. Clary 

ED 611 Laws, Regulations and Policies Affecting Occupational Education. Preq.: 
ED 527 or ED 630. 3(3-0) S. A detailed study of legislation (national and state) which applies 
directly to occupational education. Basic social issues and economic conditions which 
precipitated the legislation will be studied in depth. A review will also be made of the 
organizational structure and policies under which national legislation is converted into 
programs of occupational education. Farmer 

ED 612 Finance, Accounting and Management of Occupational Education Pro- 
grams. Preq.: ED 610. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A study of the steps which must be taken in 
financing a new occupational enterprise, following the determination of curriculum by 
area study. All financial transactions such as costs of operation, equipment purchase 
procedures and costs for construction will be investigated in detail. Belcher 

ED 614 Contemporary Educational Thought. Preqs.: Twelve hours ED; CI. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. This course will be based on a reading and discussion of twentieth-century works in 
educational philosophy. Such movements as pragmatism, reconstruction, perennialism 
and existentialism will be considered. Graduate Staff 

ED 616 History of Higher Education in the United States. Preqs.: Six hours of grad. 
ED courses and CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A study of the history of higher education from the 
colonial period to the present. Emphasis is on how philosophic, political, social and eco- 
nomic forces influence the function and structure of higher education. Harvey 

ED 618 School Law for the Administrator. Preq.: ED 518 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. A comprehensive study of constitutional, statutory and case law as it relates to elemen- 
tary and secondary school administration. Emphasis is on legal issues associated with 
governance, finance, property, personnel and curriculum. Beezer 

ED 620 Cases in Educational Administration. Preqs.: Grad. standing and CI. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. This course utilizes the case study and case simulation approach to the study of 
school administration. Administrative concepts will be developed and applied to simulated 
situations and to actual case histories. The administrative process is viewed as a decision- 
making process. The student will be expected to make decisions after considering alterna- 
tive courses of action and after projecting probable consequences. Dolce 

ED 621 Internship in Education. Preqs.: Nine credit hours in grad. level courses and CI. 
3-9 F.S.Sum. Utilizing the participant-observer role, this course requires participation in 
selected educational situations with emphasis upon development of observational skills, 
ability to record relevant observations by means of written journals, skills in analyzing 
experiences identifying critical incidents and projection of events and consequences. The 
student is required to develop possible alternative courses of action in various situations, 
select one of the alternatives and evaluate the consequences of the course of action selected. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 625 Cross Cultural Counseling. Preqs.: ED 530; 9 semester hrs. grad. -level ED. 3(3-0) 
S. Theory and practice of counseling culturally different clients. Client populations include 
African-Americans, Asian-Americans, American Indians and Hispanics. Topics include 
cultural assumptions, cultural values, counselor credibility, prejudice and racism in the 
context of counseling. Locke 

ED 630 Philosophy of Industrial Arts Education. Preq.: Twelve hours in ED. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. Origins, development of industrial arts education. Philosophical foundations, 
derivation of objectives and criteria for evaluation. Contributions of the heritage to con- 
temporary concepts of industrial arts education. Young 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 161 



ED 631 Vocational Development Theory. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F. 
Alt. yrs. A study of the major theories and constructs of vocational development with 
implications for counseling and career planning. Jones 

ED 632 Applied Research Methods in Education. Preqs.: ST 507 and ED 532 or 

equivalent; Coreq.: ST 508 or CI. 3(1-U) S. Through the use of simulated educational settings 
consideration will be given to the development of research proposals or plans, selection 
and/or development of appropriate measurement instruments and the purposes and func- 
tions of various statistical designs and procedures. Simulated data will be prepared and 
analyzed using computer-based statistical packages, the results will be interpreted and a 
research report will be produced. Marshall 

ED 633 Development and Coordination of School Guidance Programs. Preq.: Grad. 
standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) S. A study of the tasks of organizing, coordinating, evaluating 
and changing school guidance programs by school counselors. Included are the study of 
goals, objectives, values, functions and evaluations as they are related to program develop- 
ment in the secondary and elementary school. Graduate Staff 

ED 634 Diagnosis of Reading Disabilities. Preq.: ED 51+5 or ED 5U6, 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
Formal and informal instruments for diagnosing reading disabilities including the com- 
pletion of a diagnostic case study describing the reading performance of a disabled reader. 

Fox 

ED 635 Administration and Supervision of Industrial Arts. Preq.: Twelve hours in 
ED. 2(2-0) F,S. Study of the problems and techniques of administration and supervision of 
industrial arts in schools and universities. Selection of teachers, teacher improvement 
methods, public relations, facilities planning and specification. Graduate Staff 

ED 636 Observation and Supervised Field Work. Preq.: CI. Maximum 3 F,S. Provides 
opportunity for observation and practice of guidance and personnel services in schools, 
institutions of higher education, agencies, business and industry. Graduate Staff 

ED 637 Seminar in Cognitive-Developmental Theory and Practice. Preqs.: 
Advanced grad. standing and CI. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Analysis of major contemporary 
theories of cognitive development (Erikson, Kohlberg, Loevinger, Hunt, Perry) as a basis 
for deliberate counseling and curricular interventions. Sprinthall 

ED 638 Seminar in Cognitive-Development Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing; ED 
637; CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A review of current systems of cognitive-developmental assess- 
ment; methods for measuring psychological growth will be included. Specific research 
design models will be reviewed as a basis for action-research. Sprinthall 

ED 640 Laboratory Experiences in Counseling. Preqs.: ED 520 or equivalent; PSY 
535; Coreq.: ED 530. 3(3-0) F. The identification and practice of fundamental skills needed 
for a person to function as an effective counselor. Emphasized is development of specific 
skills in: counseling, testing, human relations, identification of client problems and the 
design of counseling strategies. Graduate Staff 

ED 641 A Practicum in Counseling. Preqs.: Advanced grad. standing, CI. 2-6 S. A 
practicum course in which the student participates in actual counseling experience under 
supervision in a school, college or agency setting. Graduate Staff 

ED 64 IB Diagnostic-Prescriptive Practicum in Reading. Preqs.: ED 51*5 or ED 5U6 
and ED 5U 7 and CI. 3(3-0). S. Supervised teaching experience where students use diagnos- 
tic test data to prescribe remedial programs for reading-disabled individuals, implement 
instructional prescriptions and evaluate the success of remedial plans. Graduate Staff 



162 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



ED 641C Practicum in Special Education. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F.S. Practicum will be 
designed to meet the individual needs of the students enrolled in the course. The practicum 
may involve diagnosis of exceptional students, writing educational prescriptive plans for 
exceptional students, or it may focus on an individual topic that involves working directly 
with exceptional learners. Graduate Staff 

ED 641D Practicum in Science and Mathematics Education. Preq.: ED 570 or ED 
575. 1-6 F.S. Supervised practicum in appropriate settings both on- and off-campus. 
Provides an opportunity for development, implementation and evaluation in science and 
mathematics in a clinical environment under faculty supervision. Graduate Staff 

ED 641G Practicum in Middle Years Education. Preqs.: ED 507 or equivalent; grad. 
standing and CI. 3-6 F.S. Designed to provide practical experience in schools and area 
agencies concerned with middle and junior high school education. Arnold 

ED 641J Practicum in Health Occupations. Preqs.: 21 hrs. grad. work including ED 
581 and CI. 3(3-0) Alt, yrs. Based upon the participants' professional objectives, a practi- 
cum in a teaching or an administrative context will be designed appropriate to the individ- 
ual's particular discipline and area of function. Program will be designed by the student in 
cooperation with the preceptor and course instructor. Davis 

ED 641K Practicum in Supervision. Preq.: ED 551 or equivalent. 3-6 F.S. Practical 
experience in schools, school systems and area educational agencies concerned with 
instructional supervision. Parramore 

ED 641M Practicum in Instructional Technology— Computers. Preq.: 12 semester 
hours in instructional technology— computers. 3-6 F.S. Designed to provide practical expe- 
rience in schools and area agencies concerned with integrating the computer into the 
curriculum. Martorella, Vasu 

ED 642 Research Applications in Curriculum and Instruction. Preq.: ST 507 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Focus on selected methodological issues and research findings in the 
areas of curriculum development and supervision, instructional technology, English edu- 
cation, language arts, middle grades education, reading education, social studies and 
special education. Vasu 

ED 648 Theory and Process in Reading and Language Arts. Preqs.: ED 5U5 and CI. 

3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Advanced study of theoretical models of reading, research issues in 
reading and in other language processes. Theoretical models of reading are studied in 
depth. Emphasis is placed on critical examination and analysis of research investigating 
reading acquisition, mature reading behavior and related language processes. 

Fox 

ED 660 Industrial Arts Curriculum. Preq.: IA 6U5. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Industrial arts 
curriculum origins, analysis, organization, evaluation, revision. Subject matter deviation 
and classification applicable to all levels of instruction. Relationships among curriculum, 
philosophy and methdology. (Also see ED 608, ED 610, ED 630, ED 635 and ED 692.) 

Graduate Staff 

ED 664 Supervision in Agricultural Education. Preq.: ED 55k- 3(3-0) F,S. Organiza- 
tion, administration, evaluation and possible improvement of supervisory practice; theory, 
principles and techniques of effective supervision in agricultural education at different 
levels. Graduate Staff 

ED 665 Supervising Student Teaching. Preq.: Twelve hours of ED. 3(3-0) F,S. A study 
of the program of student teaching in teacher education. Special consideration will be given 
the role of the supervising teacher, including the following areas: planning for effective 
student teaching, observation and orientation, school community study, analysis of situa- 
tion, evaluating student teachers and coordination with North Carolina State University. 

Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 163 



ED 666 Supervision of Counseling. Preq.: CI. 3(1-8) F,S. A supervised practicum for 
doctoral students in assisting with the supervision of first-year students in laboratory and 
practicum experiences in individual or group counseling. Graduate Staff 

ED 686 Professional Issues in Counseling. Preq.: Doctoral standing. 1-3 F,S. Alt. yrs. 
Consideration of contemporary issues, trends and recent research in the field of counseling. 

Locke 

ED 687 Seminar in Curriculum and Instruction. Preqs.: Doctoral standing; ED 602 or 
CI. 1-3 S. Consideration of contemporary issues, trends and recent research and develop- 
ment findings in curriculum and instruction. Graduate Staff 

ED 688 Research Application in Occupational Education. Preq.: ED 532. 3(3-0) F,S. 
This course will be concerned with methodology, application, analysis and synthesis of 
research in occupational education. A review of current occupational education studies, 
clustered by areas, will be made with attention to statistical techniques, data collecting, 
data handling, and the audience and impact of particular projects and research organiza- 
tions. The class activities in research application are designed to bridge the gap between the 
theories of research methodology and the student's independent research projects. 

Coster, Graduate Staff 

ED 690 Seminar in Mathematics Education. Preq.: Departmental major or CI. 2(2-0) 
F,S. An in-depth examination and analysis of the literature and research in a particular 
topic(s) in mathematics education. Graduate Staff 

ED 692 Seminar in Industrial Arts Education. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. 
Reviews and reports on special topics of interest to students in industrial arts education. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 693 Advanced Problems in Agricultural Education. Preqs.: Six hours grad. 
credit, including one 600-level course in agricultural education and CI. Credits Arranged. 
F,S. Study of current and advanced problems in the teaching and administration of 
educational programs, evaluation of procedures and consideration for improving. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 695 Seminar in Science Education. Preq.: Department major or CI. 2(2-0) F,S. An 
in-depth examination and analysis of the literature and research in a particular topic(s) in 
science education. Graduate Staff 

ED 696 Seminar in Adult and Community College Education. Preq.: Grad. standing. 
1-3 F,S. Identification and scientific analysis of major issues and problems relevant to adult 
education. Credit for this course will involve the active participation of the student in a 
formal seminar and scientific appraisal and solution of a selected problem. The course is 
designed to help the student acquire a broad perspective of issues confronting adult 
educators and to acquire experiences in the scientific analysis and solution of specific 
issues. Graduate Staff 

ED 697 Problems of Research Design in Education. Preqs.: ED 632 and CI. 1-3 S. Alt. 
yrs. Provides the student with an individualized but structured investigation of alternative 
problem definitions, research methodologies and statistical analyses for a problem of 
his/her choosing, usually associated with thesis or dissertation. In small groups or individ- 
ually with the instructor, the student considers research design, measurements and statis- 
tical analysis necessary to conduct research. Marshall 

ED 698 Seminar in Occupational Education. Preq.: ED 527 or ED 630. 3(3-0) F,S. This 
course will be designed as a seminar-type course, with topics selected each semester. 
Attention will be given to the broad concepts of occupational education as manifested in the 
Vocational Education Act of 1963 and its amendments, and to the problems and issues 
underlying the development of and implemention of programs of occupational education at 
elementary, junior high, senior high and postsecondary levels. Coster, Graduate Staff 



164 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 699 Thesis and Dissertation Research. Preqs.: 15 hours of education; CI. Credits 
Arranged. F.S.Sum. Individual research on a thesis or dissertation problem. 

Graduate Staff 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor N. A. Masnari, Head 

Associate Professor W. T. Easter, Associate Head 

Professor T. H. Glisson Jr., Graduate Administrator 

Professors: D. P. Agrawal, W. E. Alexander, S. M. Bedair, W. Chou, J. W. Gault, 
J. J. Grainger, J. R. Hauser, S. K. Khorram, M. A. Littlejohn, N. F. J. Mat- 
thews, L. K. Monteith, H. T. Nagel Jr., A. A. Nilsson, J. B. O'Neal Jr., C. M. 
Osborn, A. Reisman, D. R. Rhodes, R. J. Trew, H. J. Trussell, A. Vanderlugt, J. 
J. Wortman; Adjunct Professors: E. Christian, J. B. Suttle; Visiting Professor: 
H. W. Etzel; Professors Emeriti: W. J. Barclay, A. R. Eckels, A.J. Goetze, G. B. 
Hoadley, W. D. Stevenson Jr.; Associate Professors: S. T. Alexander, G. F. 
Bland, J. F. Kauffman, R. M. Kolbas, S. A. Rajala, W. E. Snyder, M. W. White; 
Adjunct Associate Professor: S. H. Lee; Associate Professors Emeriti: N. R. 
Bell, E. G. Manning, W. C. Peterson; Assistant Professors: R. S. Colby, M. E. 
Elbuluk, E. F. Gehringer, R. S. Gyurcsik, A. W. Kelley, W.-t. Liu, D. L. 
Lubkeman, R.-C. Luo, T. K. Miller III, J. J. Paulos, D. R. Reeves, G. A. Ruggles, 
M. B. Steer; Visiting Assistant Professors: S. H. Ardalan, M. Chow; Lecturer: P. 
T. Hutchinson 

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers programs 
leading to the Master of Science (M.S.) with thesis, the Master of Science without 
thesis, and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in both electrical engineering and 
computer engineering. The computer engineering degree track is a joint pro- 
gram in which faculty from both the Department of Electrical and Computer 
Engineering and the Computer Science Department participate in teaching, 
research, and advising. 

All students admitted to the M.S. program are admitted initially to the non- 
thesis program. Permission to pursue the M.S. with thesis is granted when the 
student identifies a suitable subject for research and a member of the ECE 
graduate faculty agrees to direct the research. 

Requirements for the M.S. degree include thirty credits (semester hours) or 
work beyond the B.S. At least eighteen of the thirty credits must be in 500- and 
600-level ECE courses and nine to twelve must be in a minor area (e.g., mathe- 
matics or physics). For the M.S. with thesis, six of the thirty credits must be in 
ECE 699, Thesis Research. For the M.S. without thesis, six of the thirty credits 
must be in 600-level courses and nine of the thirty credits must be selected from a 
list of core courses. 

In both the electrical engineering track and the computer engineering track, 
the department offers a non-thesis option in telecommunications. A student 
pursuing this option must satisfy all requirements for a non-thesis M.S. degree, 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 165 

but with additional restrictions on courses selected in fulfillment of those 
requirements. Additional information on the telecommunications option can be 
obtained from the Graduate Administrator. 

Requirements for the Ph.D. degree include either thirty credits (semester 
hours) of graduate-level work beyond the M.S. or sixty credits beyond the B.S. 
Usually, nine of the credits beyond the M.S. will be taken in ECE 699, Thesis 
Research, and nine to twelve will be taken in a minor area. 

Each M.S. and Ph.D. student must pass a comprehensive final oral examina- 
tion administered by the student's advisory committee. Additionally, each Ph.D. 
student must pass the departmental qualifying examination and a preliminary 
examination which has a written component and an oral component. 

A student pursuing the M.S. with thesis program or the Ph.D. must identify an 
area of concentration within either electrical engineering or computer engineer- 
ing. The areas within electrical engineering in which a Ph.D. student or an M.S. 
student may concentrate include circuits, electromagnetics and microwave sys- 
tems, signal processing, communications, solid state, and power systems. The 
areas within computer engineering in which a Ph.D. student or an M.S. student 
may concentrate are digital systems, computer communications, system soft- 
ware, and applied software engineering. The department has modern, well- 
equipped laboratories in which faculty members and graduate students are 
conducting research in the areas of concentration named above. These areas of 
concentration are somewhat broad and change from time to time with faculty 
interests. Upon request, the Graduate Administrator will furnish an up-to-date 
list of research areas, specific research topics and associated faculty to interested 
and qualified applicants. 

The department, the College of Engineering, the Graduate School and several 
industrial companies can offer financial assistance of various kinds to qualified 
students and applicants. The Graduate Administrator will furnish a more 
detailed description of financial-assistance programs to interested and qualified 
applicants. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ECE 401 Introduction to Signal Processing. Preqs.: ECE 301, ECE 302. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ECE 409 Introduction to Telecommunications Engineering. Preq.: E